1st monkeypox case identified in B.C.

·1 min read
A negative stain electron micrograph shows a mulberry-type monkeypox virus particle. (CDC - image credit)
A negative stain electron micrograph shows a mulberry-type monkeypox virus particle. (CDC - image credit)

The first confirmed case of monkeypox has been identified in B.C., in a Vancouver resident.

The B.C. Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) says Vancouver Coastal Health is conducting a public health follow-up but did not provide details about how the individual contracted the virus or their symptoms.

Monkeypox symptoms include fever, rash, swollen lymph nodes, headaches and fatigue and can present anywhere from five to 21 days after exposure.

It spreads through contact with sores and items like bedding or towels with the virus on them and through respiratory droplets from coughing and sneezing during prolonged close, face-to-face contact with a person who has monkeypox.

The BCCDC says the risk of contracting monkeypox remains low.

As of June 4, more than 780 cases of the virus had been confirmed in countries where monkeypox is not typically seen, according to the World Health Organization. At least 77 of those are in Canada.

Anyone who develops symptoms of monkeypox is advised to see a doctor, wear a mask, cover any lesions and let the clinic know their symptoms ahead of arrival.

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