2021 Ford Bronco Body Shell Described By Someone Who Saw It

feedback@motor1.com (Chris Bruce)
2021 Ford Bronco Spy Photos

The hood reportedly has flared edges, like on the original Bronco.

Anticipation is building for the new Ford Bronco, and the company isn't talking. However, Sunny Joe is a member of the Bronco 6G forum, and he has a job as a truck driver that carries vehicle prototypes to suppliers. This work gave him the opportunity to see the new four-door Bronco in bare metal for about five minutes, and he reported back about the much-anticipated model on the message board.

The Bronco that he saw didn't have bumpers or a spare tire. He measured it at roughly 16 feet (487.7 centimeters) long and said there were very short overhangs. For comparison, a Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, which is probably the Bronco's closest competitor, is 15 feet 8.4 inches (478.54 centimeters) long.

Like in some spy shots, his description indicates that the side mirrors mount ahead of the windshield. This is possibly because it would allow owners to remove the front doors without affecting outward visibility.

The front end design reportedly includes a hood with upward flares that are similar to the original model. However, Sunny Joe's post describes them as being even more pronounced than on the Bronco from the 1960s.

Get Ready For The New Bronco:

The info includes an extensive description of the Bronco's profile. Slanted portions of the bodywork reportedly make the bottom of the windows for the front and rear doors lower than the edge of the hoodline. The B-pillar is thicker at the bottom than the top. This is also true of the C-pillar, but it's also slightly slanted. On the lower section of the doors, there's a crease that keeps the Bronco from appearing too flat.

The shell that Sunny Joe saw had what he thought was dark green primer over the body, and this material hid whether the body was steel or aluminum. In his few minutes with the Bronco, he didn't get a chance to notice the roof structure.

The Bronco reportedly debuts in March, so there should only be a few weeks before we find out how accurate this description is.