These 4 daughters gave their mom a Christmas gift 12 years in the making

Brides usually wear their wedding gowns just on their wedding day. These four daughters put on the white dresses once more. However, not for their own enjoyment but for their mother’s.

On Christmas, mom Terri McCaffrey’s dream of seeing her four daughters in their wedding dresses at the same time became a reality. In secret, sisters Amber, Kasey, Nikki and Skylar took their gowns out from the back of their closets to give Mom the gift she had always wanted.

A series of stunning photographs shows the four daughters together in a forest, each one wearing the special white dress in which she said her vows. The gift was presented on Christmas day.

McCaffrey shared the sweet moment when she received the photograph on her Facebook page, captioning the post: “There couldn’t be four more beautiful brides…My daughters are truly my greatest gift. They all surprised me with the most beautiful picture that I have ever been given. I can see myself in each one of my girls, and when I say it took my breath away it really did just that. They are the most thoughtful and kind and generous daughters any Momma would want, and I have (4) of them. They are my legacy and I am PROUD of all of them. I’m grateful to the Lord everyday for letting me be their Momma and friend, love you.”

The first of McCaffrey’s daughters got married 12 years ago, and since then, she has wanted a portrait of all her girls in their wedding gowns. McCaffrey’s dream became a possibility when the last of her daughters was married earlier this month, making all the four sisters married women.

The Albertville, Ala., mother tells WAFF that raising all her daughters as a single parent was very difficult but worth it. Seeing all her daughters dressed in their wedding gowns together brings her pride and a sense of accomplishment.

“I was shocked. I was shocked. I finally got it. I’ve been wanting it because it’s just something I will cherish forever,” said McCaffrey.

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