Of the 5 new fires in Yukon this weekend, none were human-caused

·1 min read
One of the weekend's five new fires, near Lake Laberge. It's being monitored by the government but is being allowed to burn.  (Wildland Fire Management - image credit)
One of the weekend's five new fires, near Lake Laberge. It's being monitored by the government but is being allowed to burn. (Wildland Fire Management - image credit)

Fire information officer Julia Duchesne wants to thank Yukoners for their caution over the weekend.

Of the five new fires that began in the territory since Friday, none were human-caused, she told CBC Radio's Midday Cafe host Leonard Linklater on Monday.

"The good news is that they were all started by lightning," Duchesne said, adding that there are currently 21 fires burning in Yukon.

She expects that number to grow over the next few days as hot, dry weather in the territory continues.

Of the five new fires, four are burning east of Ross River. One is a few kilometres from Lake Laberge, and is about 10 hectares big, Duchesne said.

"At the moment that [Lake Laberge] fire is burning in the wilderness zone," with no structures or people threatened, she continued.

"We're just going to let that one burn for now."

Same goes for the other four fires, which Duchesne points out serve an important role in Yukon ecosystems by helping new plants grow and clearing out forest floors.

"When a fire is burning far away from people, we do like to let it burn," she said.

Of the 16 remaining fires, a minority are being treated with more aggressive action, such as ignition operations. That's when a controlled burn is carried out in the path of the fire, robbing it of fuel and acting as a firebreak.

There have been 37 fires in Yukon so far this year.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting