8 municipalities without mayoral candidates as nomination deadline looms

·2 min read
Some New Brunswickers may have little choice in candidates when they go to the polls in May for municipal elections. (CBC - image credit)
Some New Brunswickers may have little choice in candidates when they go to the polls in May for municipal elections. (CBC - image credit)

Eight municipalities in New Brunswick have no declared candidates for mayor just days before nominations close for May 10's municipal elections

Candidates have until 2 p.m. on Friday, April 9 to file nomination papers with Elections New Brunswick to have their names on the ballot.

Chief Electoral Officer Kim Poffenroth said, while a significant number of contests have few, if any, candidates, that's not necessarily something to worry about just yet.

"It's not unusual for people to wait to the last minute to see if there's going to be a contest in their area before they submit their nomination papers," said Poffenroth.

As of April 6, two municipalities, Rivière-Verte and Saint-Louis de Kent, have no registered candidates for mayor or council.

Six municipalities, Centreville, Grand Falls, Meductic, Paquetville, Richibucto and Stanley have no registered mayoral candidates.

Saint-Isidore has no council candidates registered.

As well, hundreds of elected offices could be acclaimed in this year's municipal elections if more candidates don't step up to the plate by Friday.

“It’s not unusual for people to wait to the last minute to see if there's going to be a contest in their area before they submit their nomination papers,” said New Brunswick's chief electoral officer, Kim Poffenroth.
“It’s not unusual for people to wait to the last minute to see if there's going to be a contest in their area before they submit their nomination papers,” said New Brunswick's chief electoral officer, Kim Poffenroth.(Roger Cosman, CBC)

There are 243 council positions province wide where only one candidate has declared. Those contests will end in acclimation if no one else registers as a candidate.

Poffenroth said it'll be hard to say how the pandemic has affected people signing up as candidates until after the election is over, but she's optimistic more people will declare.

"There were only, I believe, six council positions that had no candidate in 2016," said Poffenroth.

"We have seen even a significant number of people submit their nomination papers today."

Candidates need to be at least 18-years-old on or before election day, be a Canadian citizen and have lived in the municipality for at least six months.

In municipalities with councillors who represent wards, the candidate must be a resident of the ward when they are nominated.

The candidate also needs to file nomination papers with the signatures of 10 nominators, who are legally able to vote in that municipality or ward.