• UPS delivers anger to Winnipeg family after painting is thrown out

    It was an heirloom painting that hung in her family home and was on its way as a wedding gift to her nephew, but now Judith Putter says UPS has thrown it in the garbage. The painting by the late Alicia Popoff, a well-known abstract painter from Saskatchewan, was purchased by Putter's parents about 28 years ago. When Putter's nephew, Jeremy, got engaged about five years ago it was promised as his wedding present.

    CBC
  • Manitoban got 'pretty beat up' on hike to Into the Wild bus in Alaska

    When 22-year-old Matthew Sharp was swept 90-metres down the middle of a fast-flowing Alaskan river Wednesday, the ensuing rush of adrenaline at first kept the underlying pain at bay.

    CBC
  • The Latest: Trump says society can't tolerate violence

    Donald Trump is pushing hard his outreach to African-American voters in a speech to a predominantly white crowd in Iowa. Speaking Saturday in Des Moines following Sen. Joni Ernst's annual Roast and Ride event, Trump began by noting "there are millions of American-Americans in this country who have succeeded" but stressed that government has failed black communities, with almost 40 per cent of African-American children living in poverty. Trump also spoke of the shooting in Chicago of NBA star Dwyane Wade's cousin Friday.

    The Canadian Press
  • Mom who died saving son kept him above water until rescue

    A mother was enjoying a family boat trip across Lake Powell when she heard a scream and splash. Chelsey Russell, a 35-year-old mother of two from Lakewood, Colorado, jumped in to rescue her son. Officials with Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which encompasses the 186-mile-long lake along the Utah-Arizona border, said the boy was in stable condition and flown to a hospital about 200 miles away in Flagstaff, Arizona, as a precaution.

    The Canadian Press
  • Mysterious brown 'goo' strewn across North Vancouver

    Residents of two North Vancouver neighbourhoods are puzzled about bags of brown 'goo' that have been strewn across their streets. "It's pretty gross," said Brian Gardiner, who kept one of the bags to examine. Gardiner says he's seen as many as 15 bags of the mysterious substance in his neighbourhood.

    CBC
  • So long, bumpy highways? N.W.T. gov't thinks it may have a solution

    If you've ever driven on highways in the Northwest Territories, you'll know that bumps and dips are a way of life — but the territorial government says they may have found a solution. Over the past four years, the Government of the Northwest Territories has been testing sections of road on Highway 3 between Behchoko and Yellowknife, using numerous methods in an attempt to combat abnormalities on highways caused each year by melting permafrost. "All of them are performing as our scientists predicted," said Kevin McLeod, the director of highway and marine services for the territory, "and there's one that's performing better than we wanted.

    CBC
  • Police lay murder charge in death of man found in Winnipeg dumpster

    Winnipeg police have charged one person with first degree murder and two others with manslaughter weeks after Garnet Walter Williams was found dead in a dumpster earlier this month. On Friday, Jeremy Lee Allen, 27, Miranda Nancy LeClaire, 32, and Lyle Barrow, 30, were arrested. All three are from Winnipeg, police said.

    CBC
  • Sugar gliders 'abandoned' at the Edmonton airport will be returned to owner

    To say it's been a full house at Ciera Kozak's place this week would be an understatement. On Wednesday, she took possession of eleven sugar gliders she says were abandoned by their owner at Edmonton International Airport, because they didn't have the proper paperwork to be put on a flight. Since then, the owner has contacted the airline, Kozak and Alberta SPCA, saying he wants the animals back.

    CBC
  • Workers tough to find in pricey Vancouver rental market

    A pair of Vancouver businesses say steep rental prices have wiped out their pool of potential employees. Patrick Mercer has worked in the service industry for nearly two decades. In the last six months, Mercer has experienced the worst labour shortage he's ever seen.

    CBC
  • Boy, 3, suffers life-threatening injuries after car hits pole in Toronto

    Toronto police say a child suffered life-threatening injuries after a car hit a pole near Avenue Road and Eglinton Avenue West early Saturday. The child was transported after the crash at Avenue Road and Roselawn Avenue to Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children. Toronto paramedics told CBC News they were called to the scene at 8:10 a.m. Two of three occupants in the car were taken to hospital.

    CBC
  • Canada Post: Saskatchewan puts measures in place for possible postal strike

    Fri, Aug 26: With a possible strike looming at Canada Post, Ryan Kessler looks at how the Saskatchewan government is ensuring social service clients will get their cheques.

    Global News
  • Alberta town imposes curfew bylaw on youth

    If you're under 15 years old and you live in the town of Bruderheim, you'll have to be home by 11 p.m. — or your parents could get in trouble. According to a new curfew bylaw that came into effect on July 6, parents can be fined up to $100 if their children are out in public late at night without supervision. Derrick Koller said to date there have been no infractions.

    CBC
  • Bangladeshi chef and wife open NJ's Kitchen in St. John's

    Bangladesh chef Jamil Hossain has worked in kitchens all over the world and that's reflected in the new restaurant he   opened this week in St. John's. NJ's Kitchen, which opened Friday in Churchill Square, will serve different types of international fare on rotation — one day it might be Mexican, another day it might be Indian, Hossain said. Hossain said he has been a chef in many parts of the world, including England and the United States.

    CBC
  • Gay activist files federal human rights complaint over blood-donation wait period

    A young Toronto-area gay-rights activist has filed a federal human rights complaint challenging Canada's policy requiring gay men to observe a waiting period between having sex and donating blood — just two months after Health Canada reduced the wait from five years to one. The complaint, filed with the Canadian Human Rights Commission by Brampton resident Christopher Karas, 20, says the new policy remains discriminatory, is outdated and needs to end.

    CBC
  • Asian carp caught near Point Pelee, ministry of natural resouces says

    A commercial fisherman netted a grass carp in Lake Erie just off Point Pelee, the Ministry of Natural Resources confirms. The description of this fish is similar to another Asian carp caught in the same waters a little over a year ago. Grass carp have also been caught in Grand River, near Dunnville, Ont., in recent years.

    CBC
  • UBC takes $50 housing fee from thousands they will likely never house

    Finding affordable housing has always been a challenge for university students.

    CBC
  • Meningitis outbreak in Chaudière-Appalaches concerning but not epidemic, experts say

    Since the beginning of the year, six cases of meningitis have been confirmed in the Chaudière-Appalaches region, five of which were in children under four years old. "It's important to stress that there is no outbreak of meningitis in Chaudière-Appalaches," said Nathalie Paré, a spokesperson with the region's Centre intégré de santé et de services sociaux (CISSS). The cases are nevertheless worrying, Paré said, and the CISSS has asked a committee of immunization experts from the provincial public health institute (INSPQ) to review the situation.

    CBC
  • Elbow River contamination warning in Calgary expanded

    Calgarians are being warned not to swim or wade in the Elbow River between Sandy Beach and Ninth Avenue S.E. due to elevated levels of fecal coliforms. Alberta Health Services issued the warning Friday, which is an expansion to a warning issued early in July of high levels of fecal coliforms in the river between 25th Avenue S.W. and Ninth Avenue S.E. The public is also warned not to drink water from the affected areas as water-borne organisms, including fecal coliforms, can cause vomiting and diarrhea.

    CBC
  • Dads learn ins-and-outs of styling daughters' hair

    The Truthful Healing Holistic Centre on Wyandotte Street East held a workshop for dads and their girls on Friday to teach the dads the finer points of ponytails, braids and other popular styles. "I think it's a generational thing," said Matt Larmond, who came to the class with his daughter Kennedy. "I think nowadays things are shared a lot," he said, explaining why it isn't just mom's job anymore. Kennedy, 4, is glad her dad took the class. She says when her dad does a ponytail it's too loose.

    CBC
  • Banff Food Bank desperate for donations as shelves nearly bare

    Shelves at the Banff Food Bank are nearly bare just days before the facility is set to reopen.

    CBC
  • Passenger recounts 'shocking' flight after object breaks outer window

    An Island man says he had an unnerving experience after an object broke the outer pane of a window on his flight from Charlottetown to Montreal. 

    CBC
  • Ontario man finally laid to rest after ashes went unclaimed in U.S. for nearly 40 years

    Freeman Barber was born in 1883, grew up on a farm near Guelph and died in 1967 in Canandaigua, in upstate New York, where he had moved with his family in the 1930s. "Now I have live human beings who are part of Freeman's story," Henry, now retired, told CBC News Friday at Avondale Cemetary in Stratford, Ont. He had kept the ashes in an office in his home since receiving that call nearly 40 years ago.. Henry drove up from New York to Stratford for a service to finally bury Barber's ashes alongside his wife and young son.

    CBC
  • Report calls on Alberta to do more about invasive species in waterways

    A new report from the Alberta Water Council is calling on the provincial government to take further action to prevent more invasive species from entering Alberta's waterways. Whirling disease affects trout and salmon, and can cause infected fish to swim in a whirling pattern and die prematurely. Jay White, who co-chaired the Aquatic Invasive Species report and sat on the provincial government's whirling disease task force 10 years ago, said there are several ways the parasite can spread, including through fish stocking and bait.

    CBC
  • First stop Ulukhaktok: Crystal Serenity cruise ship sails into N.W.T.

    The weekend the community of Ulukhaktok, N.W.T., has been waiting for has arrived. It's the largest cruise ship ever to sail through the Northwest Passage, having left Anchorage, Alaska, on Aug. 16 on its way to New York. The town's mayor, Laverna Klengenberg, says the community has been busy preparing.

    CBC
  • Hacker targets remote northern Alberta communities

    A northern Alberta municipality is in emergency mode after a suspected computer hack. The Municipal District of the Opportunity No. 17 is concerned all its files were accessed, including personal and financial information, according to a public notice released by the municipality. "We just unplugged everything and cut ourselves off from the outside world," said Deborah Juch, the municipality's manager of legislative services.

    CBC