• Young boy's violent behaviour leaves Winnipeg police at wit's end

    The child can't be identified because he's a minor in the care of Manitoba's Métis Child and Family Services, which he has been for some time. Winnipeg police won't confirm any of the boy's alleged crimes, but they do say he's been on their radar for years. Kelly Dennison told CBC News.

    CBC
  • ​Winnipeg man uses Google Maps to successfully fight photo radar ticket

    Danial Mercer used Google Street View pictures of the area where he got slapped with a photo radar ticket to have his traffic violation thrown out of court. Mercer was driving through the school zone on Harrow Street just north of Warsaw Avenue on April 6, 2015 when a photo enforcement vehicle snapped a photo of him travelling 49km/h in the 30km/h school zone in front of St. Ignatius School. Mercer said he's driven that stretch of Harrow Street often and is aware of the school zone.

    CBC
  • Potential 25 billion barrels of oil in Orphan Basin: report

    A new report suggests the Orphan Basin could hold twice as much oil as the Flemish Pass. The provincial government released a resource assessment by Beicip-Franlab on Thursday that suggests there are potentially 25.5 billion barrels of oil in the West Orphan Basin, compared to the 12.5 billion barrels the Flemish Pass is believed to hold. It's a study the provincial government hopes will attract even more investment than the Flemish Pass, which garnered $1.2 billion in bids last year.

    CBC
  • New Canadians, mostly Filipinos, snapping up homes in St. John's region

    The housing market may be slowing in the St. John's region, but there's a refreshing spike in the number of new Canadians who are snapping up homes. Veteran real estate agent and mortgage broker Debbie Hanlon has sold 22 homes to immigrant families in the past 12 months, mostly to newcomers from the Southeast Asian nation of the Philippines. It's a refreshing trend for a province that manages to retain, on average, just 25 per cent of the immigrants and refugees that come to Newfoundland and Labrador.

    CBC
  • Dangerous Toronto gang member granted leave from prison

    Tue, Aug 23: Notorious convicted murderer Tyshan Riley was granted a temporary leave from his maximum security prison in Quebec to attend his father’s funeral in Toronto last week. Ashley Carter explains why this permission was granted and how area residents near the funeral home are feeling today.

    Global News
  • RCMP allows Muslim women Mounties to wear hijab

    The Mounties have adopted a new uniform policy to allow female Muslim officers to wear the hijab. "The Royal Canadian Mounted Police is a progressive and inclusive police service that values and respects persons of all cultural and religious backgrounds," Bardsley said in an email. Male members of the Sikh faith have been able to wear the turban as part of the RCMP uniform since the early 1990s, he noted.

    CBC
  • Woman upset about cable rate just one of thousands who make bogus 911 calls, say Peel police

    Everyone knows 911 is only for emergencies, but after a Mississauga teen used the number when her parents forced her to go to a cottage over the weekend, it's become clear the word "emergency" means different things to different people. Police in Peel Region say 30 per cent of the 911 calls they've received so far this year haven't been real emergencies. Of the 180,000 calls they've gotten in 2016, many come from pocket dials or kids playing with cell phones, they say.

    CBC
  • A Quebec mother's fight to give baby her dead spouse's last name

    Renaud waited for her parents to come look after their then-two-year-old son, then left to join him. Renaud never would have suspected then that she wouldn't be allowed to give her daughter her father's name because the couple was not married. As is normal procedure, Renaud sent the declaration of birth to the government.

    CBC
  • Wind turbine collapse investigated in Nova Scotia

    An 80-metre wind turbine has collapsed in Nova Scotia, prompting an investigation by Enercon, the device's manufacturer. According to company officials, no one was injured when the turbine fell Aug. 17 at the Point Tupper Wind Farm. Nova Scotia's Department of Energy confirms they are aware of the collapse.

    CBC
  • Chemical tasting blueberries in C.B.S. worry berry picker

    A casual evening picking berries in Conception Bay South turned into a worrying experience for one man and his family, and now he's spreading the word in the hopes that others can avoid such an encounter. Stephen Lee, his wife and daughter were walking behind their house on Aug. 18, in a wooded area off Garden Road in Seal Cove, when they stumbled upon an abundance of ripe blueberries. "My daughter came over to me around the same time that I had a funny taste in my mouth, my daughter came over and asked me to smell her hand," Lee told CBC Radio's On The Go.

    CBC
  • British man accused in Bali police death confesses to fight

    A British man arrested in the killing of a police officer on the tourist island of Bali confessed to bashing the Indonesian man with a beer bottle and leaving him unconscious, police said Tuesday. David Taylor and his Australian girlfriend, Sara Connor, were arrested Friday, two days after the bloodied body of traffic police officer Wayan Sudarsa was found on the beach outside the Pullman Hotel in Kuta, a popular tourist area. Connor's handbag was found nearby.

    The Canadian Press
  • 'Enough is enough': Fort McMurray requests amalgamation review

    As the ongoing battle over Fort McMurray's rural-urban divide boils over, the province is being asked to intervene. A coalition of rural stakeholders, upset over what it sees as unequal taxation and poor living conditions, has asked the provincial minister of municipal affairs for a third-party review of the 1995 agreement that formed the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo. At a committee meeting Monday, Wood Buffalo councillors voted unanimously to "send an expression of support" for the rural stakeholders in their request to the province.

    CBC
  • Dog owner opts for DNA testing, hoping her dog will be safe from proposed bylaw

    The wording in Montreal's proposed dangerous dog bylaw has some pit bull owners wondering how safe their dogs actually are from being taken away. The bylaw defines pit bulls as Staffordshire bull terriers, American pit bull terriers, American Staffordshire terriers, any mix with these breeds or any dog that presents characteristics of one of those breeds.

    CBC
  • Archaeologists make 'thrilling' Ottawa rail history discovery near LRT line

    As construction of Ottawa's $2.1-billion light rail network chugs along, archaeologists have unearthed a 145-year-old slice of rail history near Bayview station in the city's Hintonburg neighbourhood. The railway turntable, also known as a wheelhouse, was operated by the Ottawa St. Lawrence Railways. It was discovered two weeks ago on the site where Trinity Developments is planning to build several mixed-use condo towers.

    CBC
  • Britain Bakes In Sweltering Temperatures As Heatwave Hits

    The sun is out, the mercury is rising, and Britain is sweltering in a heatwave that looks set to continue throughout the week. Temperatures in the South East have hit 30C, and some parts of the country are hotter than Turkey. It’s good news for the Bank Holiday weekend, temperatures are predicted to remain high and summery.

    Matilda Long
  • Sheriff: Man killed 5 with axe and gun in middle of the night

    Derrick Dearman entered the house in Citronelle before dawn Saturday, Mobile County Sheriff Sam Cochran told The Associated Press. An axe and a gun were used in the killings of each of the five adult victims, police allege in criminal complaints filed Tuesday in Mobile County District Court. On Monday, as Dearman was led to jail in shackles, he professed his love for the estranged girlfriend whose family and friends were massacred and blamed the killings on drugs.

    The Canadian Press
  • How EpiPen's maker raised prices, and hackles, so much

    Sky-high price hikes for EpiPen, the injected emergency medicine for severe allergic reactions to foods and bug bites, have made its maker the latest target for patients and politicians infuriated by soaring drug prices. The company, Mylan, has a virtual monopoly on epinephrine injectors, potentially life-saving devices used to stop a runaway allergic reaction. Mylan N.V., which has headquarters in Hertfordshire, England, and Pittsburgh, has hiked prices as frequently as three times a year over the past nine years, pushing its list price for a package of two syringes to more than $600.

    The Canadian Press
  • Astronaut breaks US record: 521 days in space and counting

    Astronaut Jeffrey Williams has a new record for NASA under his space belt. The commander of the International Space Station marked a U.S. recording-breaking 521st day in orbit Wednesday, a number accumulated over four flights. By the time Williams returns to Earth in two weeks to close out his latest half-year trip, he will have logged 534 days off the planet for NASA.

    The Canadian Press
  • Lions, tigers and poodles? Dogs a big draw at Pyongyang zoo

    North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's latest gift to the residents of Pyongyang, the renovated central zoo, is pulling in thousands of visitors a day with a slew of attractions ranging from such typical zoo fare as elephants, giraffes, penguins and monkeys to a high-tech natural history museum with displays showing the origins of the solar system and the evolution of life on Earth. One, a King Charles spaniel, was presented as a gift to Kim's father, Kim Jong Il, by "the U.S. company Tapco" in 1995.

    The Canadian Press
  • Premier Brad Wall discusses the potential sale of SaskTel

    Premier Brad Wall took time during his post-cabinet shuffle media scrum Tuesday to discuss the potential sale of SaskTel. On Tuesday, Wall said Dustin Duncan, the new minister responsible for SaskTel, is the right person to lead that if it were to happen. Opposition interim leader Trent Wotherspoon said the NDP will fight the government on any SaskTel sale.

    CBC
  • Deaf driver's shooting death by trooper under investigation

    The North Carolina Highway Patrol is urging people not to jump to conclusions as state agents investigate how a deaf driver with a history of minor offences ended up dead after leading a trooper on a 10-mile chase. The family of Daniel Kevin Harris said he was unarmed and suggested the sequence of events last week was a tragic misunderstanding — the type the state's training manual warns troopers to avoid when dealing with the hearing impaired. Authorities haven't said why Trooper Jermaine Saunders fired, and a review of public records shows a few traffic charges against Harris from other states, including damaging his employer's vehicle with his own car after he was fired last year, according to a Denver police report.

    The Canadian Press
  • New mall in Victoria sells 'high' quality pot products

    At Canna Mall in Victoria, every store sells only marijuana products — a first of its kind in Canada. The mall markets itself as a one-stop shop for "high" quality weed products and has attracted vendors despite the current lack of regulations in the marijuana industry. The city of Victoria has plans to regulate marijuana dispensaries, while at the federal level, Ottawa is poised to legalize recreational marijuana.

    CBC
  • Militants attack American University in Afghanistan, 1 dead

    Militants attacked the American University of Afghanistan on Wednesday, killing at least one person and wounding another 18, officials said. AP photographer Massoud Hossaini was in a classroom with 15 students when he heard an explosion on the southern flank of the campus. The students then barricaded themselves inside the classroom, pushing chairs and desks against the door, and staying on the floor.

    The Canadian Press
  • Hope Blooms shares garden plots with new neighbours from Syria

    The north-end community garden and salad dressing business, conceived and run by youth from the Gottingen Street area of Halifax, has drawn refugee families into its fold. When members noticed that Syrians who live in a building across from the garden plots seemed interested in their work, they reached out to the newcomers. "Hope Blooms is a community that's perceived to be impoverished [but] the will to give, the generosity is still there," said Alvero Wiggins, a youth leader with Hope Blooms.

    CBC