• Man charged with wearing clear plastic wrap bikini on beach

    BEACH HAVEN, N.J. — Police say a 59-year-old man who wore a bikini fashioned out of see-through plastic wrap on a New Jersey beach is facing a criminal charge.

    The Canadian Press
  • Senior Hells Angel convicted in elaborate RCMP cocaine sting

    A B.C. Supreme Court justice has convicted a senior member of the Hells Angels of conspiring to import and traffic cocaine following an elaborate RCMP sting operation. David Giles was one of five men on trial in Vancouver in connection with a 2012 undercover operation which saw investigators posing as organized criminals in meetings from Vancouver to Panama City. According to a decision written by Justice Carol Ross, Giles told officers he thought were with a South American drug cartel that he was broke after fighting previous charges and trying to get back on his feet.

    CBC
  • Russia warns against US attack on Syrian forces

    Russia warned the United States Saturday against carrying out any attacks on Syrian government forces, saying it would have repercussions across the Middle East as government forces captured a hill on the edge of the northern city of Aleppo under the cover of airstrikes. U.S.-Russian tensions over Syria have escalated since the breakdown of a cease-fire last month, with each side blaming the other for its failure. Syrian government forces backed by Russian warplanes have launched a major onslaught on rebel-held parts of the northern city of Aleppo.

    The Canadian Press
  • 'This thing could just explode': dead sea lion concerns Point Grey beach users

    A sea lion carcass washed up on the beach in Vancouver's Point Grey neighbourhood is attracting plenty of attention, and some beach users are hoping that someone steps in to dispose of the bloating beast. It could just explode," said nearby resident Ross McIntosh, who walks on the beach near MacDonald Street every day. McIntosh is concerned the animal's thick flesh will allow enough pressure to build up that the carcass catastrophically erupts, but according to Vancouver Aquarium research biologist Chad Nordstrom, that seems unlikely.

    CBC
  • Health Canada seizes health products, hormones, from Winnipeg supplement store

    The owner of a Winnipeg supplement store that had five health products seized from her says she's cut ties with the Canadian distributor that sold them to her. Health Canada took five workout and weight loss products from Keebo Sports Supplements on St. Mary's Road in Winnipeg Friday. Health officials say products Yohimbine, Diesel Fuel Stim, Amp-Stim, HydroxyElite and Andro Quad all have ingredients that can pose serious health risks.

    CBC
  • Convicted murderer escapes from Sask. prison

    Police are searching for a convicted murderer who escaped from the Saskatchewan Penitentiary in Prince Albert, Sask. today. 

    CBC
  • Unscripted Trump overshadows his own economic message

    Thousands of Michigan voters roared with approval as Donald Trump lashed out at an economic system he said was rigged against everyday Americans. The Friday night speech was the latest example of Trump's sharpened focus on the economy — and his Democratic opponent's shortcomings — as he treks across the Midwestern battlegrounds he needs to become the 45th president of the United States. Lifelong Republican loyalists across the country are beyond frustrated that Trump's dueling personas appear to be jeopardizing the GOP's chance to take back the White House.

    The Canadian Press
  • Marijuana labs spawn lethal explosions across the country

    An explosion that destroyed a New York City home and killed a firefighter has drawn attention to marijuana-making methods that are legal in many states — but can also be lethal. A New York fire battalion chief died responding to the blast Tuesday in a Bronx home that authorities say had been converted into an indoor marijuana farm. Indoor marijuana farmers can create potential fire hazards by using natural gas, propane or butane to power carbon dioxide generators that make the plants grow.

    The Canadian Press
  • 2 teens charged in death of 15-year-old boy in Scarborough have their first day in court

    Fri, Sep 30: 18-year-old Desmond Lincoln Williams has been charged with second degree murder in the stabbing death of 15-year-old Kareem Deerr. A 14-year-old has also been charged with manslaughter. Ashley Molnar has the latest.

    Global News
  • Strata crackdown locks out Airbnb guest

    When Kyle MacDonald and his fiancée booked a five-night stay at a luxurious two-bedroom downtown suite through Airbnb, they didn't expect to be caught in the crossfire between the owner and the building's strata. "I think there is potentially a higher risk for people making Airbnb bookings in the City of Vancouver ... This will happen to other people, other people will get locked out of their buildings," he said.

    CBC
  • Haida leader asks B.C. premier to stay away for royal visit

    After a week of trailing the royal couple, B.C. Premier Christy Clark was asked by the Haida Nation not to come to Friday's event. The community is opposed to the controversial Pacific NorthWest LNG project that received approval from the federal government this week. Clark was not part of the events Friday on Haida Gwaii.

    CBC
  • Canadian expat photographer, 74, found dead on Mexican highway

    A 74-year-old Canadian photographer who "saw beauty in everything" was killed in Merida, Mexico, officials and a business associate said Saturday. State prosecutor spokesman Baruch Velasquez identified the victim of an apparent homicide as Barbara McClatchie Andrews, a one-time photojournalist who had turned to abstract photography in recent years. Velasquez said McClatchie Andrews was a resident of Merida, the capital of Yucatan, where she ran an art gallery called "In Lak'Ech".

    The Canadian Press
  • Super-luxury yacht visits Saint John

    A super-luxury yacht said to be worth around $80 million U.S. docked in Saint John harbour this week.

    CBC
  • Boy, 6, dies days after South Carolina school shooting

    A 6-year-old boy who was critically wounded in a school shooting died Saturday, days after a 14-year-old boy opened fire on a school playground, authorities said. Jacob Hall had been fighting for his life at a hospital after a bullet struck him in a main artery in his leg, causing him a major brain injury due to the loss of blood. Jacob died about 1 p.m. Saturday, and an autopsy will be done Sunday, Anderson County Coroner Greg Shore said.

    The Canadian Press
  • Hamilton takes pole at Malaysian GP

    Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton put himself in the best possible position to wrest back the lead in the Formula One drivers championship by claiming pole position for the Malaysian Grand Prix on Saturday. Hamilton beat his teammate and title rival Nico Rosberg by four tenths of a second in qualifying. The British driver headed Mercedes' first-ever front-row lockout in Malaysia and set a new Formula One lap record at the Sepang International Circuit with a time of 1 minute, 32.850 seconds.

    The Canadian Press
  • Quebec group pushes Ottawa to recognize former slave burial site

    A Quebec cemetery where black slaves are believed to be buried should be formally recognized as a historical site, say a black rights group and some Montreal city councillors. "We have written to the United Nations as well as the federal and provincial governments over the years asking that this site be preserved in memories of the sacrifices and contributions of the black community," said Dan Philip, the organization's president. The site near the Vermont border is a rocky outcropping known as "Nigger Rock," and Philip says he is in favour of keeping the controversial name, despite the Quebec government deciding in 2015 to strip the word from all place names in the province.

    The Canadian Press
  • Alberta agrees to $50M deal to take over private medical lab tester in 2022

    Alberta took a giant step Friday to taking medical lab testing away from private sector providers. Alberta Health Services announced Friday it will pay DynaLife $50 million for its assets and take over as employer for its 1,200 staff. The plan kicks in when the recently extended contract with DynaLife expires in 2022.

    The Canadian Press
  • Lousy commute downtown for West Islanders, transport minister warns

    Quebec Transport Minister Laurent Lessard announced Friday that upcoming construction work will hinder motorists driving in from the West Island for the next two years. The ramp connecting Highway 20 East to the Turcot Interchange will be down to one lane starting Oct. 14 until 2018.

    CBC
  • The coach house rules: city set to permit small homes in yards

    Ottawa home owners will soon be allowed to build coach houses in their yards, if new rules presented by city staff are adopted by council later this month. "The idea of the coach houses is to allow for a gradual and discreet kind of intensification, particularly in lower-density neighbourhoods that might have originally been built as nothing but single, detached houses," said Tim Moerman, the city planner leading the file. The City of Ottawa has long had zoning to allow for apartments within existing homes, but not for smaller, second units in people's yards.

    CBC
  • Minimum wage in Ontario rises to $11.40 today

    Minimum wage in Ontario officially rises to $11.40 per hour today — an increase from $11.25. Ontario is one of four provinces seeing their minimum wage increase today. Alberta's minimum wage is increasing from $11.20 to $12.20, and the province plans to increase it to $15 by 2018.

    CBC
  • 1,700 households in Windsor, Ont., area damaged by flooding from rainstorm

    Officials say more than 1,700 households in the southwestern Ontario communities of Windsor, Tecumseh and Lakeshore have been damaged due to a rainstorm that began Wednesday night. Tecumseh Mayor Gary McNamara, who declared a state of emergency on Thursday, says 10 per cent of households in his town were affected by rain. Windsor also declared a state of emergency on Thursday saying it needed to get access to support from higher levels of government.

    The Canadian Press
  • Als draw first sellout for Chapdelaine's debut as head coach against Argonauts

    It is probably no accident that Jacques Chapdelaine's first game as head coach of the Montreal Alouettes coincides with the struggling CFL club's first sellout in three seasons. A full house of 23,420 will be on hand when Chapdelaine, the first French-speaking Quebecer ever to coach the club, makes his CFL head coaching debut on Sunday afternoon when the Alouettes (3-9) play host to the Toronto Argonauts (5-7). Maybe that's what it is," Chapdelaine joked Friday.

    The Canadian Press
  • New Jersey coast to get disputed, long-delayed sand dunes

    Almost four years after Superstorm Sandy pummeled his neighbourhood so badly that Britain's Prince Harry had to stop by for a look at the damage, Paul Jeffrey is ready to sleep soundly again. It is among shore towns in a 14-mile stretch of coast that will soon be getting protective sand dunes as part of a $150 million project that has been repeatedly delayed by litigation from some property owners. New Jersey officials solicited bids this week for the project, which Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin said should begin in the spring.

    The Canadian Press
  • Hoarding increases fire danger, says Sask. fire marshal

    Hoarders put themselves and firefighters at greater risk by surrounding themselves with combustible materials, says Regina fire marshal Randy Ryba.  A fire investigator of more than 20 years, Ryba said he has seen many cases where hoarding made it difficult for firefighters to respond. 

    CBC
  • N.W.T. bishop expects assisted-death funeral issue rare for northern Catholics

    The head of the N.W.T.'s Catholic diocese says full funeral rites within the church won't be offered to people who choose physician-assisted death, although he suspects it won't be a frequent issue in the North. "We have not encountered this situation yet, and I kind of hope we don't, for obvious reasons," says Bishop Mark Hagemoen. Hagemoen was one of six bishops, along with five from Alberta, whose name appears on a new set of guidelines to instruct pastors in Alberta and the N.W.T. on how to deal with physician-assisted death.

    CBC

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