• Winnipeg's Somali community holds vigil for Mogadishu bombing victims
    News
    CBC

    Winnipeg's Somali community holds vigil for Mogadishu bombing victims

    Winnipeg's Somali community gathered Saturday to mourn friends and family killed in last weekend's deadly bombing at a market in Mogadishu and to bring attention to the ongoing violence in the country. The death toll from last Saturday's bomb blast — described as the most powerful ever seen in Somalia's capital — rose to 358 as of Friday with dozens still reported missing.

  • 'I love him and I almost lost him': Montreal couple ties the knot in hospital after lifesaving surgery
    News
    CBC

    'I love him and I almost lost him': Montreal couple ties the knot in hospital after lifesaving surgery

    Five weeks ago, Gerry Champagne was on the brink of death. The unlikely ceremony took place Saturday in the company of friends, family and the surgeon who saved Champagne's life. Champagne was all smiles as he prepared for the ceremony held at the Royal Victoria Hospital, part of the McGill University Health Centre network.

  • Breaking down the boot boom: Why are Blundstones so popular?
    News
    CBC

    Breaking down the boot boom: Why are Blundstones so popular?

    It seems to be a common problem in mudrooms across Canada, and it's all because of the popularity of Blundstone Originals — slip-on, ankle-length leather boots with elastic sides. "Every porch you go into, pretty much, you're going to see a pile of, typically, rustic browns in the corner," says Jameila Ali, who handles marketing and inventory at First Western Boutique in St. John's, one of Canada's earliest sellers of Blundstones.

  • Winnipeg police officer dragged 75 metres after trying to make traffic-stop arrest
    News
    CBC

    Winnipeg police officer dragged 75 metres after trying to make traffic-stop arrest

    A Winnipeg police officer was dragged for nearly a block after trying to arrest a suspect during a traffic stop early Saturday morning. Officers spotted a car with fresh damage to its side driving down St. Mary Avenue near Donald Street around 2:15 a.m. After pulling the vehicle over, they found the driver was the subject of two arrest warrants and court-ordered conditions.

  • News
    CBC

    'Complete shambles': Jasper man spends night on bus after mountain snowstorm strands travellers

    A Jasper man says he was stranded on a bus for almost 18 hours after it became stuck in deep snow this week on Highway 93 in Banff National Park. Motorists are urged to be prepared for early winter conditions while travelling along the Icefields Parkway.

  • To learn how to say New Zealand leader's name, just call her
    News
    The Canadian Press

    To learn how to say New Zealand leader's name, just call her

    When an Australian journalist wanted to find out how to correctly pronounce the name of New Zealand's incoming prime minister, he — unwittingly — went straight to the top. According to The New Zealand Herald, Tiger Webb of Australia's ABC Radio called the New Zealand Parliament on Friday to find out how Jacinda Ardern, who takes over as prime minister this coming week, pronounces her surname. Webb was transferred to the Labour Party's offices, and none other than Ardern herself answered the phone.

  • 8-year-old boy flagged as security threat takes the fight to clear his name to Ottawa
    News
    CBC

    8-year-old boy flagged as security threat takes the fight to clear his name to Ottawa

    Two years after Adam Ahmed was stopped at Pearson airport while travelling to a hockey game and flagged as a possible security threat, the young boy's fight to clear his name and that of hundreds of others is heading to Parliament Hill. "It started with Adam, but it's become something a lot bigger," his father, Sulemaan Ahmed, told CBC News ahead of the deputations. Canada's no-fly list — officially called the Specified Persons List under the Secure Air Travel Act (SATA) — dates back to 2007, and while the government has refused to confirm specific numbers, is estimated to contain as many as 2,000 names of people considered a threat.

  • News
    CBC

    How Quebec's face-covering ban stacks up to laws elsewhere around the globe

    Quebec's new law on religious neutrality prohibits anyone from receiving or giving public services with their face covered, making it the first place in North America to effectively ban face veils in public places. Bill 62, passed Wednesday in Quebec's National Assembly, means Muslim women who wear a niqab or burka have to uncover their faces to access health services, attend school, and ride a public bus or Metro. While the guidelines for how the legislation will be enforced won't be ready until next summer, Muslim advocacy groups and civil liberty organizations have criticized the legislation as an unconstitutional infringement on peoples' rights.

  • News
    CBC

    'No negligence was involved' after 33-cm plate left inside surgery patient, says report

    The complaints commissioner at the Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM) has ruled that an incident where a 33-centimetre metal plate was left in the abdomen of a cancer patient was not caused by negligence on the part of staff. When the error occurred, at the beginning of each operation, an initial count was made of surgical objects being used and a recount was done at the end. Despite the "failure of procedure," the report cleared all CHUM staff of any wrongdoing.

  • Trudeau condemns appointment of Mugabe as WHO ambassador
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Trudeau condemns appointment of Mugabe as WHO ambassador

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called the appointment of Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe as a goodwill ambassador for the World Health Organization "unacceptable," joining a chorus of widespread condemnation. The United States and a host of other countries, health and human rights leaders have criticized the appointment of Mugabe who has been long been accused of human rights violations.  Trudeau said he was dismayed when he first heard of the appointment.

  • A new study shows that the number one killer in the world is pollution.
    Global News

    A new study shows that the number one killer in the world is pollution.

    Today's Global News Hour at 6 Health Matters is brought to you by Pharmasave.

  • News
    CBC

    Search for missing hunters in Northern Quebec continues after 1 found dead

    Search and rescue teams are still looking for three missing hunters in the Waskaganish, Que. area after one member of their party was found dead on the shores of Rupert Bay Thursday. An aerial search crew located the first man, who has been identified as 48-year-old Patrick Salt. The Eeyou Eenou Police Force have been working to recover the missing men, identified as Kenneth Salt, 67, Matthew Diamond, 43, and Gabriel Shecapio, 30.

  • 'I'll never stop fighting' says Kitchener Rohingya man after 2-week stint in Bangladesh camps
    News
    CBC

    'I'll never stop fighting' says Kitchener Rohingya man after 2-week stint in Bangladesh camps

    Amid the despair and hunger of a Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh, Ahmed Ullah watched as a young girl snuck into a food line. Instead, she was beaten by members of the Bangladeshi military. The Kitchener, Ont. resident spent two weeks helping Rohingya refugees in camps near Cox's Bazar, a city and fishing port in south-eastern Bangladesh.

  • News
    CBC

    Eat, gym, repeat: Bodybuilder Roland Poitras says he has 'a pretty great addiction'

    "It's a pretty great addiction I have," said Poitras. As for the fuel for those workouts, Poitras is a big chicken fan. It's a good thing, he says, since a bodybuilder's diet needs to include a lot of proteins.

  • Nets' national anthem singer kneels to finish performance
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Nets' national anthem singer kneels to finish performance

    The national anthem singer at the Brooklyn Nets' home opener took a knee at the end of her performance. Justine Skye was nearing the completion of the song Friday night when she went to one knee for the finish. There were some cheers, but appeared to be more boos from the crowd at Barclays Center to see the Nets play the Orlando Magic.

  • New Westminster's Army & Navy reopens as department stores struggle
    News
    CBC

    New Westminster's Army & Navy reopens as department stores struggle

    "So proud to be re-opening," said Jacqui Cohen, CEO and president of Army & Navy Department Stores. The company also has stores in downtown Vancouver, Langley, B.C., Calgary and Edmonton. The Army & Navy is the last-family owned department store in Canada.

  • News
    CBC

    'No pets allowed': B.C. group rallies for legislative change for renters

    Finding a home to rent in many parts of British Columbia can be tough at the best of times and, throw a pet into the mix, can become nearly impossible. Pets OK BC, a grassroots advocacy group, is trying to remove what it says are unfair restrictions on pet owners. Under current laws, landlords can turn away a renter if they own pets as well as restrict the number, size and type of pet.

  • News
    CBC

    'Unknown' RCMP special constable identified quickly on social media

    The identity of an RCMP special constable, labelled in a vintage photo at Yellowknife's museum as "unknown," was a months-long mystery until this week. When CBC Nunavut posted the photo on its Facebook page on Tuesday, Nunavummiut (the people of Nunavut) figured out within minutes who this man was, and where the photo was taken. The photo is part of the RCMP special constables exhibit at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre in Yellowknife.

  • Burrard Bridge reconfiguration complete with heritage lighting and fewer vehicle lanes
    News
    CBC

    Burrard Bridge reconfiguration complete with heritage lighting and fewer vehicle lanes

    The art-deco style bridge's life has spanned 85 years and a number of configurations, with the most recent designed to accommodate active forms of transportation while reducing the number of vehicle lanes from five to four. Mayor Gregor Robertson opened the bridge Saturday afternoon after acknowledging the traditional territory that it was built on top of in the 1930s. Some pieces of the landmark have been replaced, including sidewalks and lighting fixtures, while parts of the structure, such as heritage handrails, have been restored.

  • US commanders stress 'ironclad' commitment to defend SKorea
    News
    The Canadian Press

    US commanders stress 'ironclad' commitment to defend SKorea

    U.S. naval commanders on Saturday reiterated Washington's "ironclad" commitment to defend South Korea against North Korean threats as an American nuclear-powered aircraft carrier visited a South Korean port following a joint naval drill. Rear Adm. Brad Cooper, commander of Naval Forces Korea, said aboard the USS Ronald Reagan that the drills enhanced the allies' ability to co-ordinate operations. The five-day drills that ended Friday involved fighter jets, helicopters and 40 naval ships and submarines from the two countries training for potential North Korean aggression.

  • Thailand rehearses lavish $90 million funeral for late king
    News
    Reuters

    Thailand rehearses lavish $90 million funeral for late king

    By Amy Sawitta Lefevre BANGKOK (Reuters) - Drums and a band played as officials in black tops and ancient costumes rehearsed on Saturday for the funeral procession of Thailand's late King Bhumibol Adulyadej, whose cremation next week is expected to be attended by a quarter of a million mourners. In the present, the king's body is placed in a coffin but the urn is still used to represent the monarch's remains. Others held gold-framed portraits of the late king.

  • News
    CBC

    'It tears at the heart': Manitoba Icelandic museum honours Indigenous hero John Ramsay

    A new exhibit honouring an Indigenous man credited with saving the lives of newcomer Icelanders in 1875 will be unveiled at the New Iceland Heritage Museum in Gimli, Man., Saturday. The exhibit will tell the poignant and tragic story of John and Betsey Ramsay through song and video, including a new documentary by filmmakers Andy Blicq and Huw Eirug, and a haunting song written and performed by Juno Award-winning Indigenous singer William Prince. The documentary is a key piece of the exhibit, said Eyford, but it also includes photos and documents relating to the story of Ramsay, and a display with a series of buttons that show short clips from the film when pressed.

  • Judge tosses $417M award against Johnson & Johnson
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Judge tosses $417M award against Johnson & Johnson

    A judge on Friday tossed out a $417 million jury award to a woman who claimed she developed ovarian cancer by using Johnson & Johnson talc-based baby powder for feminine hygiene. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Maren Nelson granted the company's request for a new trial, saying there were errors and jury misconduct in the previous trial that ended with the award two months ago. Nelson also ruled that there wasn't convincing evidence that Johnson & Johnson acted with malice and the award for damages was excessive.

  • News
    CBC

    What's a hobby horse? Mummers Festival hopes to bring back old Newfoundland tradition

    Hobby horses are, hopefully, making a comeback. The crafts, which were made throughout the island as part of Christmas celebrations decades ago, will be the focus of this years Mummers Festival. "We've never really treated the hobby horse as its own theme, and [we] would like to broaden the public's knowledge on this," said festival director Ryan Davis.

  • News
    CBC

    Winterjazz returns, raising money for future musicians

    Glen Strickey and Winterjazz are back at it again, bringing soul-humming sax tunes to Charlottetown for the 11th year. The new season of Winterjazz begins Saturday night at its annual stomping grounds — the Pourhouse in Charlottetown — and will feature Nova Scotia singer-songwriter Charlie A'court. The annual jazz concert series is always a joy to play for Stickey, the founder of Winterjazz, but it's also a fundraiser with all the proceeds from each monthly concert going toward Island students interested in pursuing jazz in their post-secondary education.