Abandoned kitten 'didn't need to die,' P.E.I. Humane Society says

·2 min read
Courtney Farrell, community development specialist at the P.E.I. Humane Society, hugs the surviving kitten after it was discharged from the Atlantic Veterinary College. (Shane Ross/CBC - image credit)
Courtney Farrell, community development specialist at the P.E.I. Humane Society, hugs the surviving kitten after it was discharged from the Atlantic Veterinary College. (Shane Ross/CBC - image credit)

When staff at the P.E.I. Humane Society saw a box on the front step when they came to work early Wednesday morning, they assumed it was a donation of food.

But when they looked inside, they were shocked to find two kittens "in pretty rough shape."

They rushed the kittens to the Atlantic Veterinary College. One is now in stable condition and back at the shelter, said Ashley Travis, the humane society's development and communications co-ordinator.

The other has died.

"It's pretty shocking," she said. "It can cause undue suffering when an animal is abandoned like this."

The humane society is encouraging people who are surrendering a pet to go through the proper channels — by contacting the shelter during operating hours at 902-892-1190 or after hours on the emergency line at 902-892-1191.

Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC

There is no cost to surrender an animal to the humane society, and they are accepted without judgement, Travis said.

"We don't want anyone to feel bad for making the best call for an animal….  We understand that these are difficult times that we are living in."

There has been an increase in the number of animals coming into the shelter, she said. Often they come from people who have been evicted from their apartment, or, with rising inflation, can no longer afford to pay for their care.

But Wednesday was the first time in at least a year that an animal has been left without consulting with its owner.

Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC

It leaves staff at the humane society without knowledge of any past medical issues or other information that can be passed on to its new owners, Travis said.

And it also could save the pet's life.

"That poor kitten didn't need to die."