Abortion doctor signals she'll sue Indiana AG over comments

·2 min read

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indianapolis doctor who performed an abortion on a 10-year-old rape victim from Ohio took the first step Tuesday toward suing Indiana's attorney general for defamation.

Dr. Caitlin Bernard, an Indianapolis obstetrician-gynecologist who gave the girl a medication-induced on June 30, filed a “tort claim notice” claim over what she says are false statements that Attorney General Todd Rokita has made about her and her work.

Bernard received widespread attention after she gave an interview to the Indianapolis Star about the child, who traveled to Indiana from Ohio for the abortion. A so-called fetal heartbeat law took effect in Ohio last month after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. Such laws ban abortions from the time a fetus' heartbeat can be detected, which is typically around the sixth week of pregnancy.

A 27-year-old man was charged last week in Columbus, Ohio, with raping the girl, confirming the existence of a case that was initially met with skepticism by some news outlets and Republican politicians.

Bernard's lawyer, Kathleen DeLaney, filed the “tort claim notice” against Rokita just days after she sent a cease and desist letter. The claim starts a 90-day period for the state to settle it. If it's not settled, Bernard could file a lawsuit. The claim didn't say how much money Bernard is seeking, noting that “the harm is ongoing.”

"Mr. Rokita’s false and misleading statements about alleged misconduct by Dr. Bernard in her profession constitute defamation," the claim reads. “The statements have been and continue to be published by or on behalf of Mr. Rokita and the Office of the Attorney General.”

After the news of the 10-year-old's abortion broke, Rokita told Fox he would investigate whether Bernard violated child abuse notification or abortion reporting laws. He also said his office would look into whether anything Bernard said to the Indianapolis Star about the girl's case violated federal medical privacy laws. Rokita offered no specific allegations of wrongdoing.

Records obtained by The Associated Press and local news outlets show that Bernard submitted her report about the girl's abortion on July 2, which is within Indiana’s required three-day reporting period for an abortion performed on a girl younger than 16.

Rokita did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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Arleigh Rodgers is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues. Follow her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/arleighrodgers

Arleigh Rodgers, The Associated Press

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