Accession of King Charles proclaimed at Fredericton ceremony

·2 min read
New Brunswick Lt.-Gov. Brenda Murphy signed the accession proclamation and read it aloud to those in attendance at the ceremony Saturday.  (Aniekan Etuhube/CBC - image credit)
New Brunswick Lt.-Gov. Brenda Murphy signed the accession proclamation and read it aloud to those in attendance at the ceremony Saturday. (Aniekan Etuhube/CBC - image credit)

New Brunswick Lt.-Gov. Brenda Murphy formally proclaimed the accession of King Charles to the throne during a ceremony at Government House in Fredericton Saturday afternoon.

Premier Blaine Higgs, senior government officials, Wolastoqi Elder Imelda Perley and the Most Rev. David Edwards participated in the ceremony.

A ceremonial 21-gun salute took place at the end of the events, with blanks being used by military members.

On Sept. 8, Canada's head of state, Queen Elizabeth, died. She was 96. After her death, King Charles automatically became the sovereign of Canada.

But it is tradition for a proclamation of accession ceremony to be held when a new sovereign inherits the throne. Higgs said New Brunswick followed the protocol of holding the proclamation within two days of the Queen's death.

Jonathan Brady/The Associated Press
Jonathan Brady/The Associated Press

Earlier today, Gov. Gen. Mary Simon met with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his cabinet at Rideau Hall in Ottawa to sign an order in council and a proclamation of accession that officially announced the Queen's death and proclaimed King Charles as Canada's new monarch.

With the accession issued, lieutenant-governors across Canada hold similar ceremonies to the one in Ottawa in their capital cities.

Murphy was brought forward to read the proclamation in Fredericton and sign it along with the attorney general.

When speaking with reporters after the ceremony, Higgs said he was saddened by the loss of the Queen.

Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press
Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

"I think there's not many figures in public life that after 70 years leave with such dignity and brought such stability to everywhere she went and everyone she met," he said.

Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press
Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

Higgs said Queen Elizabeth provided consistency worldwide during her reign that "goes beyond our individual views to a collective view of the greater good." He said he hopes that "consistency of purpose" is carried on.

Books of condolence for the former Queen will remain at Government House for the next eight days for members of the public to sign.