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PETITION: 455K PEOPLE WANT TARGET TO ABANDON PLASTIC BAGS

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A frequent Target customer is asking the Minneapolis-based retail giant to stop using plastic bags. Protest organizer Theresa Carter and other Target shoppers plan to deliver pages with more than 455,000 signatures to the corporation’s headquarters on Thursday, which is traditionally one of the busiest shopping days of the year. The petition calls for Target to commit to eliminating plastic bags that Carter says are “choking the earth." She says other retailers including IKEA and Costco have already nixed plastic bags. A Target spokeswoman says the company has taken several steps to reduce its use of plastic.

NEW SUBMARINES TO TAKE NAMES OF PEARL HARBOR BATTLESHIPS

HONOLULU (AP) — New U.S. Navy submarines will revive the names of the USS Arizona and USS Oklahoma, two of the biggest casualties of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor during World War II. The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported Monday that Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly has announced nuclear,Virginia-class attack submarines will carry the names. The battleships were targeted during the surprise attack on the naval base in Hawaii by Japanese air forces on Dec. 7, 1941. Most of the Navy's personnel casualties in the attack were on the two ships docked near Honolulu. The fast-attack submarines will be designated USS Oklahoma, SSN-802, and USS Arizona, SSN-803.

CONGRESS GOES ON RECESS WITHOUT ROUTE 66 PRESERVATION FUNDS

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Congress has recessed for the holidays, and it has gone another year without passing legislation that would boost funding for Route 66. The lack of movement on reauthorizing the Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program means there will be no cost-share grants aimed at reviving old tourist spots in struggling towns where the Mother Road passed through. The program has helped finance projects like rehabilitating parts of the historic Rialto Theatre in Winslow, Arizona. Route 66 Alliance executive director Ken Busby says the lack of dedicated federal funding for preservation work puts people trying to save Route 66 in a jam.

STUDY: NO EVIDENCE MUSEUM'S STOVEPIPE HAT WAS LINCOLN'S

A new study found no evidence to corroborate that a beaver-skin stovepipe hat, a centerpiece of Illinois' Abraham Lincoln museum, ever actually belonged to Lincoln. A WBEZ report says findings from the study include that the hat didn't appear to be Lincoln's size.The study criticized a lack of due diligence to verify any link between the hat and Lincoln before it was purchased in 2007 and went on display at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. The hat was once appraised at $6.5 million. The 16-month study was conducted by Illinois State Historian Samuel Wheeler.

HUNTER RESCUED AFTER 30-FOOT DROP INTO ABANDONED WELL SHAFT

POTTERY ADDITION, Ohio (AP) — Rescuers in Ohio say it's fortunate a hunter had his cellphone with him when he fell 30 feet into an abandoned well shaft. The Herald-Star reports that Frank Dawson was able to dial 911 after he fell into the shaft Saturday night in eastern Ohio. Rob Herrington is leader of the Jefferson County Urban Search and Rescue Team. He says hypothermia would have set in quickly for Dawson, who was trapped up to his waist in cold water. Dawson said he was hunting in woods when he fell down the grass-covered hole. The rescue took about 25 minutes.

KENTUCKY-VIRGINIA PARK SEEKS RECORD-BREAKING SWING BRIDGE

PIKEVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A state park that borders Kentucky and Virginia wants to build the longest pedestrian swinging bridge in North America. News outlets report the 725-foot bridge would cross the Russell Fork river and connect the Virginia and Kentucky sides of the park. A Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority grant of up to $433,000 would help fund the bridge, which park officials said would be the longest in North America. The park has an additional $326,000 in funds from other sources earmarked for the bridge. Construction is set to start in 2020 and end in 2021. The grant funds would also go toward other park maintenance and construction.

The Associated Press