Amazing tree climbing doggy has no fear

This amazing dog loves to climb trees! Must see!

  • Prince Harry and Meghan's arrival could mean 'new grounds' for Canada's privacy laws
    News
    CBC

    Prince Harry and Meghan's arrival could mean 'new grounds' for Canada's privacy laws

    British paparazzi may soon come face-to-face with Canada's privacy laws as the arrival of Prince Harry and Meghan has already prompted a warning to the U.K press to back off or face legal action.But it's unclear what legal recourse the royal couple will have to keep news photographers away from their family.David Fraser, a Halifax-based privacy lawyer, says, when it comes to privacy claims in Canada, he hasn't found any related to celebrities and paparazzi.The lawsuits here that relate to invasions of privacy, most recently, deal with large-scale business data breaches, or hidden cameras, he said."So this is relatively new grounds that we're looking at, maybe because we don't have the same sort of paparazzi culture or the same sort of celebrity culture in Canada. But so far, a claim like this has not been made or at least hasn't gone to a published decision," he said. "It's not something that's really been tested a whole lot in Canada. We don't have a paparazzi culture."Buckingham Palace announced Saturday that the prince and his wife will give up public funding and try to become financially independent. The couple is expected to spend most of their time in Canada while maintaining a home in England near Windsor Castle in an attempt to build a more peaceful life. Video from Sky News showed Harry landing at Victoria's airport late Monday. The prince, Meghan and their eight-month-old son Archie were reportedly staying at at mansion on the island. Lawyers for the couple sent a letter to British new outlets, accusing photographers of "harassment," and claiming that paparazzi have permanently camped outside their Vancouver Island residence, attempting to photograph them at home using long-range lenses.They also allege that pictures of Meghan — on a hike with Archie and her two dogs, trailed by her security detail, on Vancouver Island on Monday — were taken by photographers hiding in the bushes. "There are serious safety concerns about how the paparazzi are driving and the risk to life they pose," the letter read.When it comes to privacy issues in Canada, there are a few ways Canadians can take action, says Iain MacKinnon, a Toronto-based lawyer. One can argue "intentional infliction of mental stress" in which the conduct of the defendant has to be proven to be flagrant and outrageous; calculated to produce harm, and results in visible and provable illness, he said.There's also what's known as "intrusion upon seclusion" in which the defendant's conduct must be intentional or reckless and have invaded the plaintiff's private affairs "without lawful reason." Also, a "reasonable person would regard the invasion as highly offensive causing distress, humiliation or anguish," MacKinnon said.And there's public disclosure of private facts, when one publicizes an aspect of another's private life — without consent — that would be highly offensive to a reasonable person. The publication also would not be of legitimate concern to the public."And Meghan Markle walking her dog in a public space … would not fall under any of those," MacKinnon said.They may seek recourse under the B.C. Privacy Act which specifically says it's a violation for somebody to willfully and without a legal basis violate the privacy of someone else, and allows for someone to sue the alleged perpetrator.In making that determination, a judge is required to take into account the circumstances of the situation, the relationships between the parties and other people's rights and interests. There is an exemption, however, for journalistic publications and if the matter is of public interest. "Up until now, certainly when they've been part of the Royal Family and are highly public figures and are paid, their whole and entire lifestyle is paid for by public funds, then that's certainly one justification for arguing that what they do is a matter of public interest," MacKinnon said."As they may recede from public life and become more private citizens, that argument may be more difficult to make. But certainly today, this is headline news, them leaving England, leaving the Royal Family, moving to Canada. It's tough to say that this is not a matter of public interest."Most people won't consider it to be highly offensive that someone took a picture of Meghan in public park because there isn't a reasonable expectation of privacy, MacKinnon said."Now, if they're shooting with telephoto lenses into a house where Harry and Megan are staying and they're photographing them in their private lives inside a house, that might be a different story."Fraser says, under the act, an invasion of privacy can also include surveillance."It's really going to depend upon the exact circumstances of what's alleged. But it certainly sounds like a group of photographers, paparazzi following them around might fit into the category of surveillance," he said.Fraser said even if one is in a public place, there's still an expectation of privacy.Being in a public park, there's a significantly reduced expectation of privacy. But when it comes to a photographer hiding in a bush, a court might say it's arguable that one has an expectation of privacy if they are in a place, looking around, not seeing other observers and somebody has hidden themselves, Fraser said."There would also probably be an element of kind of additional intrusion based on the fact that the person has hidden themselves and is covertly trying to surveil somebody," Fraser said.The Charter of Rights and Freedoms doesn't give anybody a particular privacy interest among individuals — only against the state. It does, however, provide a right for freedom of expression, which would be the right that the photographers have, Fraser said."So any court considering these issues would have to balance those interests which includes the rights of journalists to collect information, to disseminate that information, against a particular privacy interest."Still, Fraser believes Harry and Meghan could find a "level of sympathy" in the courts "Given that, it seems that they're moving from the United Kingdom to Canada, least part time, in order to get away from this glare and get away from these invasions of privacy," he said. It's unlikely that the royals would see a big cash windfall in the event their legal claims were successful. Privacy damages are relatively low or modest in Canada, Fraser said. "But I would expect that an injunction so a court order requiring the paparazzi to stay away might be something that they would seek as well."And as MacKinnon noted, Harry and Meghan, through their lawyers, are probably attempting to set new ground rules."My guess is that they're trying to draw a new line in the sand here with both the Canadian media [and], more likely, the Fleet Street tabloids."

  • Cash-strapped rural Alberta 'can't wring money' from struggling oil and gas firms, premier says
    News
    CBC

    Cash-strapped rural Alberta 'can't wring money' from struggling oil and gas firms, premier says

    Premier Jason Kenney urged rural municipalities to work with the province to help struggling oil and gas companies Tuesday, adding they can't get "money from a stone."He made the comments following a survey that said the oil and gas sector owes $173 million in unpaid taxes to rural municipalities — more than double since a similar report was done last spring.Speaking to reporters Tuesday, Kenney said the sector has seen a few bankruptcies in the past year while other companies are barely hanging on."You can't wring money from a stone," Kenney said, suggesting that could be the case for a number of smaller natural gas producers who are having trouble right now."The best solution, in our view, is to create a future for those companies that are struggling."Rural Municipalities Alberta (RMA) distributed a survey of its members Monday that showed the amount of unpaid taxes from oil and gas companies had grown by 114 per cent since a similar survey last March.Years of low oil prices have left many small producers in dire straits but rural communities say those unpaid taxes are leaving significant holes in their budgets.The RMA said legislative gaps make it difficult to recover lost taxes from energy companies. When an oil and gas company goes bust, municipalities rank below regulators as creditors, the association said.Al Kemmere, president of the RMA, told CBC News Tuesday he will meet with the provincial minister of municipal affairs next month to discuss the situation.Asked about the premier's comments, Kemmere agreed there needs to be discussion about solutions, but cautioned rural municipalities only have so much flexibility under the Municipal Government Act."We are also in a very limited scope of what we can do, too, because [while] other levels of government can … build a deficit into their budget, we cannot," Kemmere said."That limits us again on what we can do and how we can find solutions. We either balance a budget every year or we are in contempt of our own act."Kenney said rural municipalities have the legal ability to take action when taxes go unpaid.But Kemmere maintained they don't have that authority other than through the civil courts — something he said could be "really messy" and puts risk on taxpayers.On Tuesday, Kenney was asked how the province would find a balance between the rural municipalities and the industry. He said he didn't view them as competing priorities but competing realities. "On the one part, the municipalities need the revenue and they have every right to assess it and and to seek to collect it — they have the legal right to collect it," Kenney said. "But for companies that are on the verge of bankruptcy, they have no cash and very little in the way of assets. There's not a lot to go after."So I would just say with the municipalities, you know, work with us to try to create the best conditions to turn that economic situation around."The industry is seeking reforms to how taxes are assessed on oil and gas companies.Properties are assessed by the provincial government, which evaluates them on replacement cost and not on market value, Ben Brunnen, vice president of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, said Monday."What we're seeing is a need to update the way our assets are valued inside municipalities," he told CBC News."If we do that, we'll find a way for companies to then … perhaps invest more because the economics are better over the long term and our industry will come out stronger."On Monday, Ponoka County Reeve Paul McLauchlin said about 40 per cent of unpaid taxes are from severely distressed companies in an industry hard and widely hit by lower resource prices. The rest of the shortfall is from companies that continue to operate but don't pay."My personal opinion is that this is a tax revolt," McLauchlin told Canadian Press. "They are using this as a lever to decrease their assessment and change those costs."A group concerned about the unpaid taxes, the Alberta Liabilities Disclosure Project, is planning a protest outside the McDougall Centre in downtown Calgary on Wednesday.

  • Manitoba premier says grain-drying would be exempt from a provincial carbon tax
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Manitoba premier says grain-drying would be exempt from a provincial carbon tax

    BRANDON, Man. — One day after signalling a compromise on a carbon tax, Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister pitched the idea to agriculture producers who have largely opposed a tax on carbon and who have faced big bills from the federal levy.Pallister told an agricultural exposition Tuesday that he plans to introduce a provincial carbon tax which, unlike the federal one, would not apply to grain-drying costs."Just that alone is a significant indication of the cost benefits of having a Manitoba plan," Pallister told a few hundred people at Manitoba Ag Days."We are going to implement our made-in-Manitoba green plan because it is better for the economy than Ottawa's, it is better for the environment than Ottawa's and, most importantly it is better for us, our children and grandchildren than Ottawa's."The announcement follows Pallister's decision Monday to open a door to negotiate with the federal government toward a provincial carbon tax.Manitoba originally proposed a flat $25 per tonne levy, but withdrew the plan when Ottawa said it was not good enough. The federal government imposed its own tax, which is set to rise to $50 per tonne by 2022.Pallister's stance breaks with his fellow Prairie conservative premiers. Alberta's Jason Kenney and Scott Moe of Saskatchewan are vocal opponents of the federal tax and have refused demands to implement their own carbon pricing system. All three provinces are challenging the federal levy in court.The federal carbon tax has also been widely opposed in Manitoba's farming areas — a big base for Pallister's Progressive Conservatives.Keystone Agricultural Producers, the province's largest farm group, said it is pleased with Pallister's promise to exempt grain-drying costs,"I would think it is a step in the right direction," said Keystone president Bill Campbell."When you put (it) all together, it looks like ... about $1.7 million that Manitoba agriculture is paying in a carbon tax for grain corn alone."Farmers across much of the West faced a soggy harvest in the fall and have had to spend time and money drying grain with natural gas and propane. Campbell said they also face competition from farmers in the United States who do not pay a carbon tax.Pallister promised other help for producers. He reiterated an election pledge to increase the amount of ethanol required in gasoline and biofuel required in diesel, and said the change will come this year.While Pallister is working to convince people of the benefits of a provincial carbon tax, he is not prepared to say what dollar amount he is planning. He has only said he wants credit from the federal government for the billions of dollars Manitoba has spent on developing clean hydroelectricity.However, federal Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson did not appear enthusiastic about crediting the province for past measures. Wilkinson said on Monday that carbon plans should be focused on reducing emissions that exist currently.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 21, 2020Steve Lambert, The Canadian Press

  • Tesla crosses $100 billion stock market valuation in extended trading
    News
    Reuters

    Tesla crosses $100 billion stock market valuation in extended trading

    The milestone comes less than a month after Tesla's stock crossed $420, the infamous price at which Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk had tweeted he would take the electric car maker private. Musk tweeted he had "funding secured" to take Tesla private in August 2018, when its shares were trading in the mid-$330s, only to later give up under investor pressure and regulatory concerns. Tesla shares were last up 1.4% at $555 after the bell, building on a 7.2% gain during trading when brokerage New Street Research raised its price target to $800.

  • 'It's a downer for everybody': St. Dorothy school community laments end of an era
    News
    CBC

    'It's a downer for everybody': St. Dorothy school community laments end of an era

    Nick Calasurdo has fond memories of his days at Montreal's St. Dorothy Elementary School, so it was with a heavy heart some four decades later that he picked up his youngest child from the school Tuesday.This will be the last year that Calasurdo, whose eldest child attended the school as well, will be picking anybody up at St. Dorothy — one of three east-end schools slated to shutter in June.With the English Montreal School Board (EMSB) facing declining enrolment, the closures announced Monday evening were not unexpected, but Calasurdo said he was not the only one not to see the writing on the wall."It's pretty sad," he said. "It's a downer for everybody. All the parents are down. All the kids are down."He described St. Dorothy as a centre point for the English community in Saint-Michel, with students coming in from surrounding boroughs to attend.St. Dorothy's student population will be merged into Our Lady of Pompei Elementary School, located 1.2 kilometres away in Ahuntsic. Both schools are operating at less than 50 per cent capacity.Calasurdo said he's not sure if he will send his child to the Ahuntsic school for Grade 5 in the fall."We've never been there. It's just a different school. A different set-up. Whereas here, we've been here for years," he said. "We weren't really expecting it."'An English footprint' in Saint-Michel"Everybody's feeling quite emotional," acknowledged St. Dorothy's principal, Denis Maroun. "We're all coming together as a school community.""Some of our parents' parents went to school here," she said. "It's been a cornerstone of this community — it's been an English footprint."She said she hopes to keep together as many students, families and staff as possible through the merger. The decision to close three east-end schools was made by former MP Marlene Jennings, the Quebec-government appointed trustee of the EMSB, who said she had no choice given the lack of English-language students signing up for school in the area.The deeds of John Paul I Junior High and General Vanier Elementary School are being revoked along with St. Dorothy's."I'm actually pretty sad because I love this school and it's pretty fun," said Brandon, eight, a Grade 2 student at St. Dorothy who took a break from his basketball game to speak to reporters."I really love this school, and I want to stay here."At the same time, Brandon said he's excited to go to a new school and make new friends.St. Dorothy students will have the chance to visit their new school to "make sure they aren't going in cold," said EMSB spokesperson Mike Cohen. "We're thinking of it as less of a closure and more of a merger," Cohen said. "It's a merger many St. Dorothy's students say they're excited to take part in — especially making new friends."Quebec Education Minister Jean-François Roberge said Jennings' decision was a tough one, but it was necessary. "Of course, some parents will be sad," he said, stressing the decision was made by the EMSB and not the government. Jennings was appointed to take over the powers and functions of the EMSB's commissioners last fall after a scathing report found serious irregularities in how the board was run. Roberge said it's too soon to say if her mandate will be extended.

  • China's Wuhan shuts down transport as global alarm mounts over virus spread
    News
    Reuters

    China's Wuhan shuts down transport as global alarm mounts over virus spread

    BEIJING/SHANGHAI (Reuters) - Deaths from China's new flu-like virus rose to 17 on Wednesday, with more than 540 cases confirmed, leading the city at the center of the outbreak to close transportation networks and urge citizens not to leave as fears rose of the contagion spreading. The previously unknown coronavirus strain is believed to have emerged from illegally traded wildlife at an animal market in the central city of Wuhan. Contrasting with its secrecy over the 2002-03 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), which killed nearly 800 people, China's communist government has this time given regular updates to try to avoid panic as millions travel for the Lunar New Year.

  • The strange tale of the paid protesters supporting Meng Wanzhou at her extradition hearing
    News
    CBC

    The strange tale of the paid protesters supporting Meng Wanzhou at her extradition hearing

    Two people who demonstrated in support of Meng Wanzhou outside B.C. Supreme Court during her extradition hearing say they were unwittingly recruited under false pretences and paid to be there.Meng, the CFO of Chinese tech giant Huawei, was arrested at Vancouver International Airport in December 2018 at the request of the U.S., which seeks to extradite her to face charges of fraud. A number of people showed up on the first day of her hearing Monday and held signs supporting her.For actor Julia Hackstaff of Vancouver it all started with a promise of $100 for two hours of work in what she understood to be an appearance as an extra in a movie shoot. Hackstaff said the offer came over Facebook from a person in the acting community she has never met."It's terrible, it's horrifying," she said. "I was sincerely going to participate in something that seemed cool and a nice opportunity. And they took advantage of my profession and my passion ... to make a false protest."The second person, whom CBC News has agreed not to identify and will refer to as SP, said she was recruited by a friend promising a $150 payday just to show up at the courthouse and hold a sign."I was told it was to free Ms. Meng. I had never heard that name before in my life," said SP, also of Vancouver. "I had to go after and Google what Huawei was because I never heard that [name] before in my life. I didn't even know it was a company."Both women say they don't know who was ultimately offering the payment for their participation.SP says a woman identified only as "Jowe" [pronounced "Joey"] handed out the signs at the courthouse."She didn't say much, she just shook our hands," said SP, who was standing with a small group of people. "She disappeared for a bit and came back and she had the red signs that you can see in the pictures a lot of people holding. So I assume either she made them or someone got them made for her, and she just basically handed them out. That was it. We were given no instruction, no information on what we're doing."Hackstaff says she and a friend were told by her contact to go to the Holiday Inn a few blocks away and then brought to the courthouse. When they arrived, they approached a group of young people who looked "lost" she assumed were background actors."I went and asked, 'Are you guys the extras?' And one guy said yes. He then asked me my name and my friend's name. So we gave him our first names and he checked on his phone like [as] if he had a list."Hackstaff said she was handed a red sign that said "Free Ms. Meng, Equal Justice!" Soon after, she began questioning what was actually going on."A CBS reporter approached me and my friend and she started interviewing us. And it was in those moments and questions where I started realizing, OK, if this was background work, they wouldn't need detail on background people.""And then I started realizing, wait, no one called 'action,'" she said. Hackstaff says she "freaked out" when a second reporter approached, coming to the realization that the movie she thought she was appearing in was, in fact, something very real. She says that's when she left without being paid.SP says her friend paid her $150 via an e-transfer. She says after she read up on Meng and Huawei, she feels deep regret at having participated in what she feels was a faux protest.  "I wasn't educated ... and that's a shame on me," she said. "I really wish there was a way to go back in time."CBC News has left messages with the woman identified as Jowe. She has not responded.

  • News
    CBC

    Local performing arts festival strives for greater audience accessibility

    Organizers of the PuSh International Performing Arts Festival will offer a host of accessibility-related resources and initiatives to ensure people with special needs can still enjoy the performing arts. "It basically means that we try to take away some barriers," Anika Vervecken, PuSh's accessibility co-ordinator, told Stephen Quinn, the host of CBC's The Early Edition. The theatre, music and multimedia festival kicked off it's 16th year on Jan. 21. Performances will run until Feb. 9. For deaf audience members, certain performances will feature ASL-interpretation, captions and so-called surtitles. For blind attendees, the festival has worked with VocalEye, a Canadian live descriptive arts service, to develop audio descriptions of some visual-heavy shows.And then there are "Relaxed Performances" intended to cater to the needs of people who might not feel comfortable at a typical theatre or visual performance. For instance, some Relaxed Performances will take place with the house lights on to accommodate those who become distressed by sitting in the dark. Other times, artists may be asked to exclude extreme visual simulation, like strobe lights, that could disturb audience members who suffer from sensor sensitivities. In some cases, Relaxed Performances may even include spoilers."For somebody with autism, just the experience of going into a new space can be so overwhelming," said Vervecken. "So, we actually give them a visual story that says everything that's going to happen."People living with Tourette's and verbal tics or folks who struggle to sit still and would prefer not stay in their chair are all welcome, added Vervecken. "That's all OK," she said. "I always say the only thing that's not allowed in a Relaxed Performance is shushing. If you want to do that, then please come to an 'uptight performance.'"According to the festival, some of the most accessible performances this year include FRONTERA, Cuckoo and Old Stock: A Refugee Love Story.PuSh Festival is not the first Vancouver performing arts group to promote greater audience accessibility. The Cultch, Bard on the Beach and the Arts Club Theatre Company have all featured VocalEye, Relaxed Performances and other resources.But how do the artists feel about adjusting their work or accommodating what would typically be seen as unwanted audience disruptions? Vervecken said the response has been positive. "One of the shifts that I'm seeing that I'm really happy about is that people are starting to consider [accessibility] earlier and earlier in their process."

  • News
    CBC

    Prince Rupert schools using bottled water until copper levels confirmed to meet standards

    The school district in Prince Rupert has issued a notice that for the time being, all students and staff will be provided bottled water following recent tests showing copper levels found in the water at local schools does not meet new standards.In March, Health Canada updated its guidelines for the amount of lead and copper allowed in drinking water, cutting the amount of heavy metals permitted."The water has not changed, but the limits that we're allowed to have for our staff and students have changed," said  Prince Rupert School Board chair James Horne."Upon the last round of testing in October, we discovered we no longer met the new standard of Health Canada for both lead and copper."This isn't the first time that schools in Prince Rupert have had issues with water. In 2016, the district discovered that the level of lead found in the drinking water did not meet the standards set by Health Canada.At that point, some of the water fountains were already being replaced, and those ones met the lead standards at the time. However, the older ones tested too high, so the district worked closely with the Northern Health Authority to make sure they were in compliance and replaced the taps and the remaining older water fountains in schools. Since then, the district has increased the frequency of their water tests from every three years to once a year, added Horne.After finding too much copper and lead during October's test, the district increased flushing in schools using an automatic flushing system. That lowered the levels of lead in schools to an acceptable level — but not copper."[Northern Health has] told us to now institute a bottled water system in all of our schools, which we've started doing already, until they can confirm that we can meet the copper standard," said Horne.Old schools"Our schools are not new. This is an infrastructure issue," said the education board chair.The district is looking into several options including either replacing the lines or upgrading the filtration system, or changing the pH of the water."Whatever it takes to make the world safe for our staff and our students," said Horne.In the interim, there are signs on taps and fountains telling students and staff to use water provided from 20 litre jugs with pumps on them. However, he added that the water itself has not changed, so from that point of view, he is not worried."But to keep ourselves compliant within the new standard of Health Canada, clearly we have to change what we're doing within our schools."

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    B.C. health officials prepare coronavirus diagnostic test, screen at airports

    VICTORIA — British Columbia's health minister and provincial health officer say officials are closely monitoring an international outbreak of respiratory illness linked to a novel coronavirus after a case was confirmed across the border in Washington state Tuesday.Minister Adrian Dix and Dr. Bonnie Henry say in a joint statement there have been no cases of illness caused by the coronavirus in Canada and the risk to British Columbians is considered low.However, they say health-care workers have been asked to be vigilant and take a travel history for anyone reporting respiratory symptoms following an outbreak first identified in China.The BC Centre for Disease Control has developed a diagnostic test for the new coronavirus, which is different from the SARS outbreak when there was no similar test.Public health teams have also implemented screening for early detection of infections for travellers arriving in airports.Dix and Henry say quarantine officers are available at Vancouver International Airport to co-ordinate response and Richmond Hospital infection control practitioners are ready to respond should there be a need to investigate.Health-care workers who suspect an instance of coronavirus are asked to report it to their local medical health officers immediately."Anyone who is concerned that they may have been exposed to, or are experiencing symptoms of the coronavirus should contact their primary care provider, local public health office or call 811," the joint statement says."We encourage anyone travelling to or from China to visit the federal source of destination-specific travel information that provides important advice to help travellers make informed decisions and travel safely while abroad."Most cases of the illness have been reported in Wuhan and other cities in China, with smaller numbers reported in Japan, Taiwan, South Korea and Thailand.The first case in the United States was reported Tuesday in Washington state, where a resident had recently returned from travel to Wuhan.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 21, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • News
    CBC

    Tensions high as teachers protest Premier Doug Ford's visit to Windsor-Essex

    Ontario Premier Doug Ford's quiet and unpublicized visit to Windsor-Essex quickly became quite the opposite, when teachers protesting cuts to education showed up at a private affair in Amherstburg.A Progressive Conservative event at the Fort Fun Centre led educators to stall vehicles from entering. Police were on scene to keep the peace, and had to intervene when a man who appeared angered by the protestors got out of his vehicle. At least six cruisers were at the protest."Get the hell out of the way," the driver could be heard shouting.The event wasn't open to the general public or members of the media — only invited guests and ticket holders could enter. Ford had a brief photo-op for the media in Windsor, but did not take any questions.Outside, on a day when Catholic school teachers held a one-day strike, educators from several different unions wanted Ford to hear their message during his visit to Essex County.The Greater Essex Elementary Teachers Federation of Ontario (ETFO) said some of its key issues during negotiations include class size increases, escalating levels of violence in schools, more e-learning, potential changes to full-day kindergarten and "inadequate" supports for special education students.The province has been saying its main sticking point centres around wage increases. The government is proposing a one per cent hike, while teachers' unions want wage increases to better reflect inflation, which is anywhere from 1.8 per cent to two per cent.Wage issue 'controlling' bargaining discussionsLocal ETFO president Adelina Cecchin said the government is making negotiations about a one per cent wage increase legislation that's been passed."That interferes with bargaining," said Cecchin. "This is about bargaining and we should have the right to be able to speak about any of those priorities ... in a free and open way at the table, and that's not happening, because there's that one per cent legislation that's controlling those discussions."Although the issue of pay is on the union's radar, it's not the "primary priority," she said.Minister of Education Stephen Lecce issued a statement Tuesday calling on union leaders to end the strikes, "given the adverse effects on students and financial hardship on parents.""While this union-led escalation happens far too often, we are committed to negotiating deals that keep students in class, while providing financial support for families for child care needs," said Lecce.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Cold-stunned iguanas expected to fall from Florida trees

    MIAMI — The National Weather Service routinely warns people about falling rain, snow and hail, but temperatures are dropping so low in South Florida the forecasters warned residents Tuesday about falling iguanas.“This isn't something we usually forecast, but don't be surprised if you see Iguanas falling from the trees tonight as lows drop into the 30s and 40s. Brrrr!" NWS Miami tweeted.The low temperatures stun the invasive reptiles, but the iguanas won't necessarily die. That means many will wake up as temperatures rise Wednesday.Iguanas aren't dangerous or aggressive to humans, but they damage seawalls, sidewalks, landscape foliage and can dig lengthy tunnels. The males can grow to at least 5 feet (1.5 metres) long and weigh nearly 20 pounds (9 kilograms).Female iguanas can lay nearly 80 eggs a year, and South Florida's warm climate is perfect for the prehistoric-looking animals. Iguanas are native to Central America, tropical parts of South America and some Caribbean islands.Iguanas are allowed to be kept as pets in Florida but are not protected by any law except anti-cruelty to animals. They've been in South Florida since the 1960s, but their numbers have increased dramatically in recent years.The Associated Press

  • Risk of new coronavirus spreading to the North low, say territories' top doctors
    News
    CBC

    Risk of new coronavirus spreading to the North low, say territories' top doctors

    Health officials in the Northwest Territories and Yukon say the risk of the new coronavirus spreading to the territories is probably low.Dr. Kami Kandola, the N.W.T.'s chief public health officer, said her office is monitoring the situation and that right now, the majority of reported cases globally are related to exposure in Wuhan, the city in mainland China where the virus was first reported.There are no direct flights to Canada from Wuhan, said Kandola, and Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver airports are screening travellers who are at risk.    "It's just important that the initial ports of entry won't be through Yellowknife, Northwest Territories — it will be through these larger cities," she said.  We don't want to miss that case, should it arrive. \- Brendan Hanley, Yukon chief medical officerThe coronavirus belongs to a large family of viruses that cause illnesses ranging in severity; from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), says the Public Health Agency of Canada. Coronavirus is not currently as serious as SARS, said Kandola, but it's likely the cause of a cluster of pneumonia cases.As of Jan. 20, 282 cases of the virus were confirmed, and six people had died, according to the World Health Organization. Outside of China, cases have been confirmed in Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Thailand and the United States, and all are linked to people who had travelled from mainland China.  "The situation right now, from the Public Health Agency of Canada is that the risk is extremely low," said Kandola. However, she added, that can change with the Lunar New Year on Jan. 25, when millions of people travel around China and abroad. "We don't know what the situation is going to be after that," she said. Kandola urges people travelling between Canada and China to look at travel advice issued by the Canadian government.In Yukon, chief medical officer Brendan Hanley said the risk of seeing the virus in Yukon is "probably fairly low," but said it's worth being vigilant."I mean, look how kind of random it was that it showed up in Seattle. It's something we need to be vigilant for, prepared for ... We don't want to miss that case, should it arrive," he said.Tourists in N.W.T. have mixed feelingsAt the Nova Hotel in Yellowknife on Tuesday, tourists expressed mixed feelings about the coronavirus outbreak. Sandy Lee, a traveller from San Francisco with roots in Hong Kong, said she's "getting nervous."  "Our friends in China, they still travel." \- Bing Yem, tourist in Yellowknife"Hopefully we can prepare," she said. "Unfortunately, I don't know, because now Chinese New Year is coming up [and] people will be going back to their own region to visit their relatives."Bing Yem is a visitor from Toronto whose family is originally from mainland China. "We can manage the situation ... no worries," he said, adding he believes China's government will be able to control the situation. "Our friends in China, they still travel," he said.Practise good coughing, sneezing etiquetteThe symptoms of coronavirus mimic other common viruses, such as a fever, coughing and shortness of breath, said Kandola. She said people can protect themselves and others by washing their hands regularly and for at least 20 seconds, and by coughing and sneezing into a tissue or their elbow. They should also avoid touching their eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. While the risk of catching the new virus is low, other viruses, such as influenza and pertussis (whooping cough) are circulating around the territory. Kandola said people with cold- and flu-like symptoms should stay home, and if their symptoms are severe, they should go to the emergency room.Front-line health practitioners are being told to ask patients about their recent travel history to Wuhan, said Kandola.

  • Massive lines for groceries after Newfoundland storm
    CBC

    Massive lines for groceries after Newfoundland storm

    After days of being snowed in, Newfoundland residents flock to newly opened stores for much-needed supplies. As the state of emergency in St. John’s goes into its fifth day, the city amended restrictions, allowing grocery stores and pharmacies to stay open until 6 p.m.

  • Province overhauls SEED program again, announces fewer placements
    News
    CBC

    Province overhauls SEED program again, announces fewer placements

    The New Brunswick government is making another round of sweeping changes to its provincial student employment program in hopes of making the process more equitable for employers and employees.The Student Employment Experience Development (SEED) program will provide fewer job placements and limit employers to non-profit groups, First Nations and municipalities, the province announced Tuesday.The Progressive Conservative government is also scrapping the lottery system used to select students and allowing MLAs to recommend employers. Trevor Holder, the minister of post-secondary education, training and labour, told reporters the program overhaul brings a greater level of fairness to the process while taking politics out of it. Under the previous model, high school and post-secondary students entered a draw for placement vouchers and employers would then have to find a student with a voucher.Holder said that system meant some unlucky students never received a placement and it also created a disadvantage for rural employers and some non-profits that relied on students to run summer programs because there weren't enough nearby students with vouchers."We have heard consistently from communities, from MLAs, from stakeholders in the community that the non-profit sector was not necessarily given the attention that it had previous when, in the past, this had been strictly a non-profit, municipality program," Holder said.The new system, which is already in place, has employers applying to his department for SEED funding. Each MLA will be allowed to recommend 22 placements in their riding. The applications are reviewed, approved employers will be notified in March and the jobs will be posted online.Students can then apply directly to the employers.De-politicizing the processHolder said he trusts MLAs to be engaged in their districts and to understand the local needs, noting it's part of the government's "strategy to empower MLAs."He said each employer will be vetted and the department has the final say."In my view we have finally taken the politics out of it and treated every region around the province equal regardless of how the people in that area voted," Holder said. "And I think this will go a long way to de-politicizing this process."But the executive director of the New Brunswick Student Alliance said the changes are doing the exact opposite."I think it politicized the process," said KJ Conyers-Steede, adding the alliance pushed to remove MLAs from the process a few years ago. "We have wonderful civil servants who work within [the department] who are capable of providing insight of the services and the jobs placements."Conyers-Steede, who said the alliance was not consulted about the changes, said provincial governments continue to tinker with programs like SEED and student financial aid, using them as a "political football."He said post-secondary students who are investing in the New Brunswick system "want some predictability."The SEED program alone has been changed three times in the last five years.Fewer placementsHolder said the budget won't be changed, but there will be about 200 fewer placements available than the 1,400 last year.He said non-profit groups often require more than a 50 per cent subsidy — in some cases 100 per cent — meaning fewer dollars to go around with the new emphasis on non-profit employers.The minister said the subsidies aren't needed in the private sector."This gives us a lot more flexibility," Holder said. "It allows us to focus squarely on on the priority of making sure our non-profit sector was supported here."

  • Canadian Laurent Duvernay-Tardif didn't need long to get into Super Bowl mode
    News
    CBC

    Canadian Laurent Duvernay-Tardif didn't need long to get into Super Bowl mode

    It didn't take Canadian Laurent Duvernay-Tardif long to get into Super Bowl mode.On Sunday, the offensive lineman and the Kansas City Chiefs advanced to the Super Bowl with a 35-24 AFC championship win over the visiting Tennessee Titans. That secured the franchise its first berth in the NFL title game in 50 years.Duvernay-Tardif, from Mont-Saint-Hilaire, Que., will be playing for a championship for the first time as a football player on Feb. 2 against the San Francisco 49ers in Miami.But that didn't take away from his focus during all the on-field chaos and celebrations on Sunday."I just went back home, grabbed dinner with family and friends and went to bed,'' Duvernay-Tardif, 28, said during a conference call Tuesday."I think that's the way you have to approach it because the next day I was back in the gym getting ready for the week of practice that started (Tuesday).""I celebrated the moment on the field, went back home grabbed a nice dinner and the next morning when I woke up I was already in a Super Bowl mindset," he said.From McGill to Kansas CityThe Chiefs' veteran right guard is a converted defensive lineman who played collegiately at McGill University in Montreal. The towering six-foot-five, 321-pound Canadian will become just the second player in school history to play in the Super Bowl.Linebacker/long-snapper J.P. Darche, a Montreal native, was the first. The former Toronto Argonaut played for Seattle in its 21-10 Super Bowl loss to Pittsburgh in 2006 in Detroit.Darche played nine pro seasons with the Argos (1999), Seahawks (2000-06) and Kansas City (2007-08).Duvernay-Tardif and Darche will both make the trip to Miami with Kansas City. Darche, 44, is currently one of the Chiefs' team doctors.Ironically, Duvernay-Tardif graduated from McGill with his doctorate in medicine in May 2018. That made him the first active NFL player to hold a medical degree although he must still complete his residency.After missing most of last season with a broken leg, Duvernay-Tardif will complete his sixth NFL campaign — all with Kansas City — playing in the Super Bowl. The Chiefs selected Duvernay-Tardif in the sixth round, No. 200 overall, in the 2014 NFL draft.In March 2017, Duvernay-Tardif signed a five-year extension with the Chiefs. The deal was reportedly worth US$41.25-million, with $20 million guaranteed.Kansas City's Andy Reid is just the seventh NFL head coach to lead two teams to the Super Bowl. But Reid lost in his only other appearance, that being Feb. 6, 2006 when the New England Patriots edged the Philadelphia Eagles 24-21."Coach Reid is more than a coach, he's also a mentor for me and the team,'' said Duvernay-Tardif."The team he's put together the last five years is really talented and I think we owe him to go all the way this year. Personally, he's kind of the one who understood what I was trying to do with medical school and football and gave me the opportunity to combine both at the highest level. If it wasn't for him, I don't think I would've been able to do it so I'm really grateful.''Chasing a second titleThe Chiefs will chase a second Super Bowl title — they downed Minnesota 23-7 in Super Bowl IV — after mounting consecutive comebacks this year.After spotting Houston a 24-0 advantage, Kansas City rallied for the 51-31 victory before reeling off 28 straight points against Tennessee to erase a 10-0 deficit."We're going to have to address that . . . because the further you get along in the playoffs the better the teams are and you can't really allow yourself to be behind,'' he said."But I feel like no matter what happened those last two weeks were really good learning opportunities and as a team I think we all showed character because were able to stick together. If we're able to fix it and have that kind of confidence going into the big game I think it will help us.''Of course, having Patrick Mahomes at quarterback certainly helps. Duvernay-Tardif admits Chiefs players are routinely amazed by Mahomes' play.Kansas City had its way with a Titans defence that had allowed 13 points to New England and 12 versus Baltimore previously. But with Mahomes under centre, the Chiefs amassed 27 first downs and 404 yards of total offence.Duvernay-Tardif said Mahomes gives the Chiefs a huge edge heading into the Super Bowl."I think Pat is the greatest quarterback right now playing in the league,'' he said."Sometimes we look at the jumbotron and it's, 'Oh my God, how does he do that?' It's almost not human the amount of things he's able to process at the same time.'''That gives me goosebumps'Duvernay-Tardif admits being so close to a first-ever football championship can be a little nerve-wracking."I feel like after every season I've played football . . . you go to the playoffs and you always finish out the season losing,'' he said."This is the only time so far in my career that I have an opportunity to finish a season winning and after that there's nothing else, you've reached the top. That gives me goosebumps thinking about it.''Especially when thoughts of Super Bowl title were so very distant when Duvernay-Tardif was playing at McGill."For me throughout my whole career, it's been kind of a one step at a time approach,'' he said."It was only once I started being a consistent starter for the Kansas City Chiefs that I began having that vision of going all the way to the top and winning the Super Bowl.''

  • Missing woman, 22, found dead in frozen Burlington creek
    News
    CBC

    Missing woman, 22, found dead in frozen Burlington creek

    Halton police say the body of a missing woman, 22, was found encased in ice in a Burlington creek on Tuesday.Police said the woman's body was found "submerged under the ice" in Upper Hager Creek near Brant and Fairview streets. Officers taped off an area near Grahams Lane and Legion Road as they investigated. The woman had been reported missing on Sunday."At this time, the death does not appear to be suspicious in nature," police said in a news release on Tuesday night.Police said the coroner is now investigating.Earlier, police said there was "no ongoing, related public safety threat." They said there would be a heavy police presence in the area on Tuesday evening.Police had also said they were investigating a report of a missing person.The ice and cold hampered the recovery effort, police said. Burlington firefighters helped police, who described the recovery effort as "complicated" and said it involved the use of ropes.Halton police forensic identification services and detectives are involved in the investigation.Anyone who saw anyone walking in the area, or heard anything in the last 24 hours, or who has dashboard camera video or surveillance footage of the area, is urged to call Halton police.

  • Netflix holds its own in the streaming wars - for now
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Netflix holds its own in the streaming wars - for now

    SAN FRANCISCO — Netflix is holding its ground in the streaming wars, passing its first big test since Apple and Disney launched rival services.The company added 8.8 million worldwide subscribers during its fourth quarter, surpassing expectations at a time when it faces heated competition.Netflix had said it expected to add 7.6 million subscribers, and analysts thought the service would fare even better. The increase pales slightly next to the 8.9 million subscribers the service added in the fourth quarter of 2018.The stock dropped about 2.5% immediately in after-hours trading, likely due to a cautious forecast for the first quarter. But shares rebounded and later traded up more than 2%.The company — a pioneer in producing streaming media and binge-worthy shows — now boasts more than 167 million subscribers worldwide, bolstered by a list of well-received movies and shows released late last year. That includes the fantasy show “The Witcher” and Oscar nominees “The Irishman” and “Marriage Story.”The boost helps reaffirm Netflix’s strong standing in the increasingly crowded world of video streaming. The fourth quarter was an important milestone for Netflix, as it was marked its first head-to-head competition with Apple’s $5-per-month streaming service and Disney’s instantly popular $7-a-month option.Still, it’s unlikely to be a smooth road for Netflix. NBC, HBO and startup Quibi are all planning to launch new streaming services soon.Two big questions loom: How much are consumers willing to pay for each video streaming option? And how many will they pay for before reaching subscription fatigue?Netflix CEO Reed Hastings acknowledged the increased competition in a call following earnings, but said he believes the services are mostly capturing new viewers who are transitioning from traditional TV watching."It takes away a little bit from us,” he said of the Disney Plus launch. “But again, most of the growth in the future is coming out of linear TV.”Netflix has one major advantage over competitors: it has been collecting data on the shows viewers crave for years.“Netflix's scale allows it to reach mass audiences, which makes it easier for them to create hits when compared to newcomers to the market," EMarketer analyst Eric Haggstrom said.Netflix’s most popular plan costs $13 a month, far more than competitors from Disney, Apple and Quibi. But its price is comparable to HBO Now, and it boasts one of the largest libraries of TV shows and movies, not to mention regularly updated original shows.Hastings reiterated that Netflix isn't interested in introducing ads. Noting that the digital advertising market is dominated by companies such as Google, Amazon and Facebook, he said, “there's not easy money there.”It's also less controversial to avoid digital advertising and the scrutiny around companies making customers' personal information that comes with it, he said.In its quarterly letter to shareholders, Netflix included a chart of Google search trends that showed people searching more often for “The Witcher” than for competing shows including “The Mandalorian,” “The Morning Show” and “Jack Ryan,” from Disney, Apple and Amazon, respectively.In the U.S., Netflix added 420,000 subscribers, below its own estimates. Growth in its home country has been slowing in the last year, partly because most people in the U.S. who want Netflix already subscribe.The company reported profit of $587 million on revenue of $5.47 billion, exceeding expectations.Netflix said it expects to add 7 million subscribers during the first three months of this year, well below the 9.6 million subscribers it added in the first quarter last year.—Technology writer Michael Liedtke contribued to this report.Rachel Lerman, The Associated Press

  • Ogden youth centre officially opens days after Albert Park facility closes
    News
    CBC

    Ogden youth centre officially opens days after Albert Park facility closes

    An after school youth centre in southeast Calgary has lasted a summer soft launch to become a permanent fixture, as another centre just 10 kilometres north closed its doors only days earlier.Ogden Youth Centre is the product of an urban study initiated about three years ago, the executive director tells The Homestretch."Over the last couple of years, we bought a house, opened in June and it's been going phenomenally well," Jane Wachowich said."We have sports, a basketball court, a music studio, reading spaces, rooms for homework, a kitchen that can serve upwards of 30 meals a day."That June opening wasn't permanent though, while the group looked to nail down a needed land use amendment to operate in a residential area."We started meeting with neighbours about a year and a half ago. Our city councillor and the city was very supportive," she said."The city softly assured us about a year ago that we would have no trouble, pending neighbour approval, getting that amendment."That permit is now in hand and the police and studies show spaces like this cover a lot of ground, Wachowich said."Crime goes down, high school graduation goes up, kids don't get into as much trouble, gang membership goes down, families are supported. It costs $100,000 a year to incarcerate a kid, and probably $50,000 to operate a centre," she said."It lessens the load on social services and government, and the kids are better off."She says this centre doesn't receive government funding."Private donors, family foundations, companies. A lot of our costs are eliminated by wonderful people in the community who have leaned in to do the renovations, to bring food. We serve hot meals every day. I think Calgary is an amazing city for that."The fate of another youth centre to the north in Albert Park, however, isn't as rosy.Albert Park centre closesJust last week the Cornerstone Youth Centre, a popular space for kids from low income families, many who are classed as at-risk, closed its doors. It was operated by a separate group.It had been running after school prevention programs and giving around 70 kids access to breakfast, lunches and dinners that many wouldn't get at home.The centre's executive director said the community centre that runs the city-owned building is changing direction and economic pressures are behind the closure.Meanwhile, if Wachowich has her way, centres like Odgen's could be on the horizon in Dover, Forest Lawn, Rundle, Applewood."I have a list."

  • Family remembers 15-year-old Woburn Collegiate Institute student fatally shot
    Global News

    Family remembers 15-year-old Woburn Collegiate Institute student fatally shot

    Investigators are trying to figure out if Safiullah Khoswari was the intended target of a fatal shooting in Scarborough and if so, why. Catherine McDonald reports.

  • At 90, Alaska Native woman is 1st counted in US Census
    News
    The Canadian Press

    At 90, Alaska Native woman is 1st counted in US Census

    TOKSOOK BAY, Alaska — Lizzie Chimiugak has lived for 90 years in the windswept western wilds of Alaska, born to a nomadic family who lived in mud homes and followed where the good hunting and fishing led.Her home now is an outpost on the Bering Sea, Toksook Bay, and on Tuesday she became the first person counted in the U.S. Census, taken every 10 years to apportion representation in Congress and federal money."Elders that were before me, if they didn’t die too early, I wouldn’t have been the first person counted," Lizzie Chimiugak said, speaking Yup'ik language of Yugtun, with family members serving as interpreters. "Right now, they’re considering me as an elder, and they’re asking me questions I’m trying my best to give answers to, or to talk about what it means to be an elder."The decennial U.S. census has started in rural Alaska, out of tradition and necessity, ever since the U.S. purchased the territory from Russia in 1867. The ground is still frozen, which allows easier access before the spring melt makes many areas inaccessible to travel and residents scatter to subsistence hunting and fishing grounds. The mail service is spotty in rural Alaska and the internet connectivity unreliable, which makes door-to-door surveying important.The rest of the nation, including more urban areas of Alaska, begin the census in mid-March.On Tuesday, Steven Dillingham, director of the census bureau, conducted the first interview after riding on the back of a snowmobile from the airport to Chimiugak's home.“The 2020 Census has begun,” he told reporters after conducting the first interview with Chimiugak, a process that lasted about five minutes. “Toksook Bay isn’t the easiest place to get to, and the temperature is cold. And while people are in the village, we want to make sure everyone is counted."Dillingham was hours late getting to Toksook Bay because weather delayed his flight from the hub community of Bethel, about 115 miles (185 kilometres) away. Conditions didn’t improve, and he spent only about an hour in the community before being rushed back to the airport.After the count, a celebration took place at Nelson Island School and included the Nelson Island High School Dancers, an Alaska Native drum and dance group. Later, the community took over the commons area of the high school with a potluck of Alaska Native foods, including seal, moose and goose soups, herring roe served with seal oil and baked salmon.Robert Pitka, tribal administrator for Nunakauyak Traditional Council, hopes the takeaway message for the rest of the nation is of Yup’ik pride.“We are Yup'ik people and that the world will see that we are very strong in our culture and our traditions and that our Yup'ik language is very strong,” he said.For Chimiugak, she has concerns about climate change and what it might do to future generations of subsistence hunters and fishers in the community, and what it will do to the fish and animals. She talked about it with others at the celebration.“She’s sad about the future,” he eldest son Paul said.Chimiugak was born just after the start of the Great Depression in the middle of nowhere in western Alaska, her daughter Katie Schwartz of Springfield, Missouri, said. Lizzie was one of 10 siblings born to her parents, who lived a nomadic lifestyle and travelled with two or three other families that would migrate together, her son said.Lizzie and her 101-year-old sister from Nightmute, Alaska, survive.In 1947 Lizzie married George Chimiugak, and they eventually settled in Toksook Bay after the town was founded in 1964 by residents of nearby Nightmute. There are five surviving children.He worked maintenance at the airport. She did janitorial work at the old medical clinic and babysat.Like other wives, she cleaned fish, tanned hides and even rendered seal oil after her husband came home from fishing or hunting. Her husband died about 30 years ago.She is also a woman of strong Catholic faith, and told her son that she saved his life by praying over him after he contracted polio.For her own hobbies, she weaved baskets from grass and remains a member of the Alaska Native dance group that performed Tuesday. She dances in her wheelchair.She taught children manners and responsibility and continued the oral tradition of telling them stories with a storyknife.Chimiugak used a knife in the mud to illustrate her stories to schoolchildren. She drew figures for people or homes. At the end of the story, she'd use the knife to wipe away the pictures and start the next story with a clean slate of mud.“She's a great teacher, you know, giving us reminders of how we're supposed to be, taking care of subsistence and taking care of our family and respecting our parents,” her granddaughter Alice Tulik said. “That's how she would give us advice."___AP photographer Gregory Bull contributed to this report.Mark Thiessen, The Associated Press

  • St. John's airport opens, relieves stranded passengers
    News
    CBC

    St. John's airport opens, relieves stranded passengers

    After five days without commercial flights flying in or out of the St. John's airport, travellers are happy to finally be able to take off and touch down.The City of St. John's has agreed to allow the St. John's International Airport to resume operations as of 5:00 a.m. Wednesday morning.The announcement is somewhat bittersweet for Beverly Steele whose sister who lives in St. John's missed a surgery that could only be done in Halifax. The 12 hour surgery would be critical in removing some of the cancer in her abdomen."The sooner she gets the surgery the better," said Steele, who is concerned about the cancer getting worse as she waits. It's good to be back at work and seeing people's smiling faces. \- Patrick HanlonSteele said the surgery was booked for Wednesday but the hospital needed her sister there by Tuesday, which didn't happen due to so many cancellations. "There is nobody to blame, it is just the luck has not been in our corner as of right now," she saidSteele said it has calmed her family's nerves to secure another appointment for surgery and to see those flights back up and running."I am relieved, yes, because it's not just my sister in this situation, there are a lot of people that have to leave for many other reasons," Steele said."We just really need the airport, don't we."Krista Mulrooney, who lives in Edmonton, was among the first passengers to land Wednesday morning.Her father passed away Sunday."We're home for his funeral," she said. "I've been trying to get home for my mom and my family."Heading homeSome of those crowding around the departures board Wednesday had been trying to leave the island for days.Dean Blotto Gray, a photographer for snowboarding company Burton on his way to Japan, wasn't frustrated about being stranded.His crew had "never seen anything like this," he said. "Being in a hurricane made out of snow --it was quite thrilling. And it made our trip actually better because we stayed a little bit longer hung out with the community more and did some more snowboarding."Sherry Stinson nearly made it out ahead of the storm Friday, but ended up stuck at a hotel. She said staff and guests all came together in — even grabbing shovels to help hotel workers clear out cars."The people that I've met [are] really going to be the shining part of the entire situation," she said.Stinson's friend Karen Gray said, despite the exhaustion and intermittent feelings of isolation, she found the entire experience fantastic."We all kind of bonded together, hung out, played cards, drank some beer," Gray said."I don't think I'd want to be stuck anywhere else."Additional flights Peter Avery, CEO of the St. John's Airport Authority, told CBC Radio that the airport is prepared to open Wednesday morning and get back to business as usual."We're in pretty good shape right now. All of our main facilities, and our airfields, parking lots and roadways are cleared. So, we're ready for the go-ahead tomorrow morning," Avery said.Avery said St. John's International Airport is expecting at least 2,000 passengers inbound on Wednesday, with the same amount looking to fly out. Air Canada said in a tweet that the company plans on adding capacity to and from the St. John's Airport once it re-opens to get passengers to where they need to be as quickly as possible. Taxis back on the road Taxis were allowed to resume full operation Tuesday evening to not only get people to and from the airport but to also get people to grocery stores, gas stations, pharmacies and doctors offices."It's good to be back at work and seeing people's smiling faces and being part of the community," said Patrick Hanlon, owner and operator of Independent Taxi NL.Hanlon who was out helping people get their groceries Tuesday said the road conditions were "rather rough" but is hoping the conditions will improve for Wednesday. "All day [Tuesday] everybody was very courteous, pedestrians were also understanding of the vehicles … and vehicles were yielding to pedestrians," he said.While the city has kept taxis off the roads to help with snowclearing, Hanlon said that means time he didn't get paid. "[It's] difficult, I am out of work just like many people.""Over the last number of days I have received a good number of calls looking for service and I have been unable to service my customers … so it provides me a little more relief now."The city is asking residents to try to carpool or take a taxi to reduce traffic on the roads if possible.Read more stories from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Facebook spurred central banks to study digital currencies: former Japan central banker
    News
    Reuters

    Facebook spurred central banks to study digital currencies: former Japan central banker

    The challenge posed by Facebook's Libra cryptocurrency likely prodded major central banks to set up a new group to study the potential for issuing their own digital currencies, a former Bank of Japan executive said on Wednesday. The central banks of Britain, the euro zone, Japan, Canada, Sweden and Switzerland on Tuesday announced a plan to share experiences to look at the case for issuing digital currencies, amid a growing debate over the future of money. Hiromi Yamaoka, former head of the BOJ's division overseeing payment and settlement systems, said the decision was a sign of how Libra has triggered a global competition among central banks to make their currencies more appealing.

  • Developer unveils plans to create whole new city centre in Mississauga
    News
    CBC

    Developer unveils plans to create whole new city centre in Mississauga

    A developer unveiled proposed plans on Tuesday to take the parking lots around Square One Shopping Centre in Mississauga and turn them into a large mixed-used development that would have 37 towers.Oxford Properties Group said the 52-hectare proposed development, known as Square One District, is a "multi-phase, multi-decade" 18-million-square-foot project that will feature new condos, offices, retail and green spaces. Oxford says there will be enough housing for 35,000 people.The area to be developed borders Burnhamthorpe Road, Confederation Parkway, Highway 403 and City Centre Drive. Oxford is partnering with Alberta Investment Management Corporation to develop the area. The ambitious plans include the creation of a pedestrian-friendly civic area to be called The Strand. "What is today swaths of parking lots will be transformed into a vibrant community that will eventually comprise more than 18,000 residential units, a transit mobility hub connected to the Hurontario LRT, community buildings, parks, green spaces and forward-thinking office space," Oxford said in a news release on Tuesday.In the first phase of housing, Oxford and AIMCo are partnering with The Daniels Corporation to construct two residential towers with 402 rental apartments and 575 condo suites at the southeast corner of Rathburn Road and Confederation Parkway.The two towers, 36 and 48 storeys respectively, will be called the Rental Residences and the Condominiums of Square One District. Construction is to start in summer 2020."Square One District is a bold vision to repurpose underutilized land in the heart of downtown Mississauga to create an entirely new mixed-use urban community," Eric Plesman, executive vice president and head of North America for Oxford Properties, said in the release."This new community will support employment with world-class office space to help businesses grow while maximizing the positive impact of new transit being developed in Mississauga. It will be a place where business, life and leisure can come together as one," he added.More than half of the 18,000 residential units will be rental, according to Oxford. The new district will be anchored by Square One Shopping Centre."This is a real opportunity to deliver a walkable, downtown district in Mississauga ... Square One District is about creating a true mixed-use community," said Mark Cote, Oxford Properties' head of development in Canada."We will work collaboratively with the city and its residents to build a vibrant downtown that meets the evolving needs and aspirations of Mississauga for generations to come."