Anthony Germain to host CBC Radio's On The Go

·2 min read
Anthony Germain, who has been co-host of Here & Now for the last five years, is the new host of On The Go.  (CBC - image credit)
Anthony Germain, who has been co-host of Here & Now for the last five years, is the new host of On The Go. (CBC - image credit)
CBC
CBC

Anthony Germain, whose broadcasting career has taken him from Beijing to Bonavista, is heading back to radio.

Germain, who has been co-hosting Here & Now for the last five years, is the new host of CBC Radio's On The Go.

He will move behind the microphone of the show – which airs weekday afternoons on CBC Radio across Newfoundland and Labrador – late next week.

Germain, whose broadcasting career at CBC has included hosting the St. John's Morning Show and The House, the network's main political affairs program, said he is looking forward to the in-depth interviews that On The Go affords.

"A show like On The Go really gives you the chance to explore things in a deeper, longer format," Germain said.

"I've loved Here & Now and I like television quite a bit, but there's something special about the legacy of an afternoon show that has kind of a more laid-back vibe than the Morning Show, but still can explore things with a certain amount of depth."

Ted Blades, who had hosted On The Go for 18 years, retired last fall. Jane Adey, who has been covering hosting duties for much of the recent period, has moved back to television to host Land & Sea.

Germain said he will miss a lot from Here & Now, particularly "that energy rush from 3 p.m. until we go on the air" and how the team responds to breaking news at airtime.

That said, he noted, a radio show allows for some options not available in television.

"Here's the thing. On television, when you have a mishap, you can't play a song," he said with a laugh.

Germain said he's a fan of On The Go's style, which often includes longform interviews with newsmakers and longer takes on pressing issues.

"There's a warmth to the show," he said. "There's a nice connection with the audience, where they really feel that you're right there in the car with them, or it's the afternoon, and you're sharing a pint or cup of tea. You can talk with them for a lot longer period of time than on other shows. That's a big thing."

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