'A lot of us are having sleepless nights': friends want answers to Marpole double homicide

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'A lot of us are having sleepless nights': friends want answers to Marpole double homicide

'A lot of us are having sleepless nights': friends want answers to Marpole double homicide

There have been many sleepless nights for Jan Kainer and other friends of Dianna Mah-Jones lately.

Mah-Jones, along with her husband, Richard Jones, were found dead in their Marpole home almost a month ago in what police say was a homicide.

There have been few answers in that time, which has been hard on Kainer and other members of Razzmatap, the tap dance group Mah-Jones once belonged to.

"We talk almost every class, either before or after, just finding out how everybody's doing," she said. "A lot of us are having sleepless nights.

"Some of us are running it over in our minds every single night, like, 'What happened? Did she say something to me that could've been a clue?'

"It's more difficult than I thought, and I think our ladies are feeling the same."

Kainer says some in the group are taking sleeping pills. One was so afraid to be at home alone she went with her husband on a business trip.

She says coming together to dance helps them but they all just want answers.

'We want to solve it'

Vancouver Police Department spokesperson Const. Jason Doucette says officers want answers too.

No suspects or persons of interest have been named, but he says there are dozens of investigators involved on the case, which he called a priority for the department.

"What makes it unique is that it's not clear if this was random, if this was a targeted event. So our officers aren't leaving any stone unturned," he said.

"This particular file — we want to solve it, we want to get to the bottom of it. We're asking anyone who has information about this to give us a call."

He described tips from the public his department have received as helpful, but he is encouraging others to come forward if they think they know something.

"No piece of information is too small."

Doucette says officers are still "banging on doors" and are in touch with many people in the neighbourhood.

"We know a lot of people in the area knew these people personally, and we know that this is touching them."

With files from Tanya Fletcher