Here's Maybe The Definitive Way To Pronounce 'Pyeongchang'

Perhaps you pride yourself on yourWinter Olympicsknowledge, and you’re eager to show it off to friends and family now that the games have started.

Just make sure you’re also pronouncing the name of host city Pyeongchang correctly.

It’s “Pee-yung-chong” (saying it quickly), linguistJames Harbecksays in the video below. For those who find the clip full of TMI, you can fast-forward to the 2:55 mark. You’ll learn how to pronounce some of the other Olympics venues as well.

In the video below, a Korean woman (at the 1:40 mark) says Pyeongchang in a way that seems to somewhat support Harbeck’s version, but with a “t” sound to start the last syllable.

Same here:

Let the games begin!

Just say "the Winter Olympics in South Korea."

 

 

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

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