'Tired of the excuses': U of L Indigenous studies professor calls for review following Boushie verdict

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'Tired of the excuses': U of L Indigenous studies professor calls for review following Boushie verdict

'Tired of the excuses': U of L Indigenous studies professor calls for review following Boushie verdict

Linda Many Guns' inbox has been flooded with messages of outrage and anger since Gerald Stanley was found not guilty in the Saskatchewan shooting death of a Cree man, Colten Boushie.

The University of Lethbrige Indigenous studies professor said when she heard Friday's verdict, she was hit by a tidal wave of emotions.

"Disappointment, dismay, hurt for the family," she said. 

Many Guns believes that if the tables were turned, the outcome would have been different. 

"If [Boushie] had been holding the gun, he would have been found guilty. Probably without a trial — he would've been convinced to [plead guilty]."

Calling for full-scale review

Many Guns said Indigenous people have always been treated differently — unfairly — in the justice system, and she's had enough.

"It would be wonderful to see a whole review, right from top to bottom, of justices' treatment toward aboriginal people as victims and people that are accused," she said.

'Assist and make it better'

Travis Plaited Hair, executive director of Lethbridge's Sik-Ooh-Kotoki Friendship Society, attended a rally Sunday in Lethbridge protesting the decision and showing solidarity for Boushie's family. He attended with a group of Indigenous youth.

He said some young people may be feeling let down by the verdict but wants them to know that positive actions will have a bigger impact. 

"It's always good to step back, exhale, educate yourself on the issue and then come up with your own opinion and way to assist and make it better," he said.

'Tired of excuses'

Many Guns believes the rallies across the country on the weekend protesting the decision are the beginning of a groundswell in Canada. 

"I don't think this is going to stop until the justice system starts to make some changes," she said. "I think people are tired of the excuses, and I don't think it's acceptable. This is Canada, this is 2018. It's time we started to treat all the people that live in Canada in a just way."

Many Guns says it's important that Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians alike continue to voice their outrage over inequality in the Canadian justice system and push for change.