An armed police presence in Halfway Point left this resident with questions and concerns

·3 min read
The RCMP deployed a tactical unit to Halfway Point on Wednesday in response to a report of an assault and various firearm offences involving a 38-year-old man. (Submitted by Terri Greene - image credit)
The RCMP deployed a tactical unit to Halfway Point on Wednesday in response to a report of an assault and various firearm offences involving a 38-year-old man. (Submitted by Terri Greene - image credit)
Submitted by Terri Greene
Submitted by Terri Greene

It was a day of worry and concern for Terri Greene of Halfway Point on Wednesday.

The single mom was working at home late in the afternoon when neighbours in the tiny neighbourhood of 100 outside of Corner Brook began messaging her about an unmarked police car parked outside her home.

When she went to look she saw officers climbing down over a bank that led to her backyard.

"I knew they weren't for me so I wasn't sure what was going on, and, yeah, I was a bit alarmed but I had no idea what was really happening," Greene told CBC News.

"My dog started going a little crazy because she's a little territorial so she started barking like crazy. I was thinking, 'What are you barking at?' and when I looked out the window and looked down, there was a cop with a dog standing right outside the window."

An incident with few details in Humber Arm South — which includes Halfway Point — led to six charges against a 38-year-old man. RCMP officers from Corner Brook and Deer Lake, as well as the emergency response team, general investigation section and police dog services responded to the call.

The man was apprehended by RCMP at a hotel in Corner Brook later in the day. He's facing charges of careless use of a firearm, unauthorized possession of a firearm, reckless discharge of a firearm, possession of a firearm while prohibited, assault and uttering threats.

Police made it clear through social media there was no risk to the public. However, having the tactical unit, and armed officers created a lot of fear in the community, Greene said.

Troy Turner/CBC
Troy Turner/CBC

"Just the unknown, none of us had any idea and I didn't have any idea," she said.  "I didn't know the situation."

The RCMP was not available for an interview on the incident. In a public statement, the force said it thanks the residents of Halfway Point for their cooperation and patience during the course of the police investigation.

As the ward councillor of the Qalipu First Nation Band, Greene says she's been contacted by a lot of people since the incident. And she feels a duty to clear up any misunderstandings as to what happened.

"I hear a lot about a supposed gun shot and … I wanted to do this [interview] and make people understand it wasn't the case from what I had seen, and I was a couple hundred feet away so I had a pretty good visual," she said.

"If you know there's police presence and a lot of activity with police, don't try to come and look and park your cars and be like spectators because you're really putting a hindrance to what they're trying to do."

Greene grew up in Halfway Point, but left for about 10 years to live and work elsewhere. When she returned home two years ago, she says she's noticed a change in the community.

"It seems like there's a lot of drug usage and a lot of things like that, and I'm sure that it warrants more of a police presence," she said.

"And drinking and driving and those things, I guess all that would warrant more attention from the police, for sure."

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