Autoblog's favorite Black Friday deals roundup

Autoblog Staff

Black Friday is here once again and it seems like the sheer number of deals only gets greater every year. Here at Autoblog, we love saving money (who doesn't?), so we've put together a handful of posts featuring some of our favorite Black Friday deals, all organized by category.

Tech Deals

From iPhones to Instant Pots, there are tech deals galore out in the wild today. This list compiles some of our favorites. One deal is even over $600 in savings.

Blipshift Deals

Our friends at Blipshift are spreading the holiday cheer with their Black Flag Friday sale, featuring automotive-themed socks, wall clocks, phone cases, wall banners, and of course their incredible graphic tees.

Amazon Deals

When it comes to big sales, Amazon doesn't mess around. They've discounted nearly all of their devices so we've sorted through and curated some of our favorite deals in the above post.

Car Care Deals

Always worried about keeping your car clean, but never want to spend full price on cleaning materials? Well this post is right up your alley. We've found some solid car care deals featuring everything thing from a car vacuum to microfiber towels.

Gaming Deals

If you're a regular reader of Autoblog, you've likely picked up on the fact that most of us here are pretty huge gamers. We stream racing and driving games twice a week on Twitch, and play a lot of games in our free time. Black Friday is always a great time to pick up a new console if you're looking for one, so we found a Nintendo Switch, PS4, and Xbox One deal and dropped them all right in the above post for your convenience.

Autoblog is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. These deals are available through our affiliate partnership with Amazon.com. Deals are subject to Amazon's schedule and availability.

  • Prince Harry might be looking for a job when he comes to Canada. Here are some options
    News
    CBC

    Prince Harry might be looking for a job when he comes to Canada. Here are some options

    With the announcement on Saturday that Prince Harry and Meghan will no longer be working members of the Royal Family — and therefore no longer receiving money from the public purse — the couple may be looking for work when they eventually arrive in Canada.While Meghan Markle could go back to being an actor — she recently signed a deal with Disney for voiceovers — Harry has spent time in the military, having served two tours in Afghanistan, but he hasn't really forged a career.B.C. Premier John Horgan has already joked if they end up in his province, "I'm sure I could  find something for Harry to do."However, there are some restrictions, said Andrew Heard, a political science professor at Simon Fraser University whose research has specialized in Canadian constitutional issues and the Crown.One of the main restrictions on both of them is that they cannot be in a position where there is a reasonable perception that they, or any potential employers, might be taking advantage of the royal connection, Heard said."Even if they step back from most formal events, they will still remain members of the Royal Family and any future careers cannot appear to trade on that prestigious connection or imply privileged access to political and business elites."WATCH: Prince Harry saddened to step back, but wants 'more peaceful life'Other royals have taken on private sector jobs, although not always with successful results. Prince Edward, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth, launched a TV production firm in 1993 that failed in 2011 after years of mediocre performance. His wife, Sophie, tried to keep her established public relations firm going after she married Edward in 1999, but she was embarrassed two years later by an undercover reporter pretending to be a wealthy sheikh interested in doing business with her firm. In response, she hinted that the prospective client would get greater publicity because of her royal status. The debt-ridden firm was eventually shut down.According to Kelly Goldthorpe, a Toronto-based immigration lawyer, if Harry wants to work in Canada, he would need work authorization, and may need to utilize the CETA Free Trade Agreement to get a work permit. Another option is proving that his entry in the Canadian labour market would "have a significant cultural or economic benefit to Canada," Goldthorpe wrote.Assuming Harry could gain such authorization, CBC News contacted three executive recruiting firms to get their opinions on possible employment opportunities.Randy Quarin, senior partner, IQ PARTNERS Inc.Although Harry has limited real or Canadian business experience, Quarin said he has a number of qualities that make him an attractive candidate to employers."He's smart, well-educated, street-smart and he's athletically minded. He's disciplined. He's got military training.  And he also has his own definition of discipline that he's redefining for his present employer [the Crown].""And ... he's compassionate. He works with numerous charities. And he really seems to like and works hard for them."So taking all that into consideration, Quarin suggested Harry, with his military experience — he served two tours in Afghanistan — could become an ambassador for the Canadian Rangers.Harry and his brother Prince William were made honorary members of the 5,000-member unit that's part of the Canadian Armed Forces  Reserves and works in remote regions of Canada.But Harry could also become another ambassador of sorts. While Canadian pop star Drake is known as the Toronto Raptors' global ambassador, Harry could take on a similar role with Canada's national rugby teams, Quarin said. The Duke of Sussex has been involved in the sport as a patron of the U.K.-based Rugby Football League since December 2016, when he succeeded the Queen, who had held the role for 64 years."He could be the brand ambassador," Quarin said. "Don't forget, he used to play rugby in school. He could work on 100 per cent commission because [the rugby association] don't have a lot of money,."Quarin's third suggestion, he said, is a "no-brainer." With all his charitable work, Harry could turn being a spokesman into a full-time gig.Harry is already involved in a number of charitable pursuits, including the Invictus Games Foundation,  an international sporting event for injured or wounded soliders, and  and Sentebale, an African-based foundation to help vulnerable children."The hard one about that is pick the one that is really near and dear to him."Sheila Musgrove, founder, CEO of TAG RecruitmentMusgrove described Harry as a solid communicator, personable and likable, with good people skills that translate into a number of disciplines.She, too, said he could lead any charity in the countryWith his military experience, and his involvement working with injured soldiers, he could play the the same role in Canada, working with the Canadian military, helping veterans.But there are other potential ways he could leverage his military skills, she said. In 2012, Harry qualified as an Apache attack helicopter pilot, graduating as the best co-pilot gunner in his class after 18 months of training. Musgrove said she could see Harry working as an air ambulance pilot.(After his military stint, Harry's brother, William, worked as an air ambulance pilot before focusing full-time on his royal duties.)WATCH: Who will pay for Harry and Meghan's security?"What a great story that would be.You're injured. You fall down and then you get rescued by a prince," Musgrove said.Or, for something a little different, why not train to fly commercial airlines?"If John Travolta can fly for Qantas, the prince can fly me from Calgary to Toronto," Musgrove said.Musgrove also said Harry could get involved in Canadian rugby, leading the Canadian rugby organization to elevate the level of sport in the country.And if Harry and Meghan settle in the West, a perfect gig for him, said Musgrove, would be ski instructor or a lift operator "if he wants to be among the people."Michael French, regional manager, Robert Half Harry's upbringing has groomed him for some sort of leadership role, French said. And his military experience means he comes with a lot of "fantastic skills.""The ability to get things done. Tremendous perseverance. A lot of integrity," French said.He said he could certainly see Harry headlining a global initiative, or landing at several "very small but very deserving organizations.""They may not be big companies, but they may be some not-for-profits that need an elevation. I think he's going to follow his heart," French said. "I think he's going to be really focusing on organizations that are doing great work that are probably underfunded, underserviced that are making a change."But Harry could also hit the speaking circuit, French said."He will be a very hot, in-demand speaker and he's an excellent speaker, he said. "I can see him being very selective of who he speaks for. I can't see him speaking at an Apple or Microsoft event."French said their firm always advises companies to hire "for fit, not for skill," meaning they seek those who possess leadership qualities and can be trained for the missing skills.Companies are full of people who can tick all the task boxes, French said."What they're looking for is someone who can lead them and be the front, I think [Harry's] got a lot of that."

  • Manitoba carbon tax a maybe, Pallister says after meeting Trudeau in Winnipeg
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Manitoba carbon tax a maybe, Pallister says after meeting Trudeau in Winnipeg

    WINNIPEG — Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister is holding out the possibility of imposing a carbon tax in his province as he tries to fashion a green plan that will meet with the federal government's approval.But he's simultaneously warning that Ottawa will have to show some flexibility if it wants him to continue playing the role of bridge-builder to the other two Prairie provinces, where talk of western alienation and outright separation has escalated since Justin Trudeau's Liberals won re-election on Oct. 21."The prime minister has said and numerous of his colleagues have said that they are seeking to build a stronger country. To do that, Manitoba is the bridge," Pallister said Monday after a 30-minute meeting with Trudeau, who is in Winnipeg for a federal cabinet retreat."If you can't get along with friendly Manitobans, there's a lot of other Canadians you can't get along with."Pallister's government initially came up with a green plan that included a carbon tax that was below the national standard set by the Trudeau government. He scrapped the plan when it was rejected by Ottawa and joined his fellow conservative premiers in challenging the federal carbon-tax backstop in court.Ottawa is imposing its tax on provinces that have refused to meet the national standard for pricing carbon emissions: Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario. The national tax was initially imposed in New Brunswick as well but that province came up with its own tax after the election, which has since been approved by the feds.Pallister said he'll unveil a new green plan and discuss it with the federal government "in the not-too-distant future." That dialogue, he added, "will include a carbon price of some kind."Manitoba NDP Leader Wab Kinew said a carbon tax is "long past due" and Pallister should stop fighting it.Whereas the national carbon tax is structured to escalate over time, Pallister indicated that he believes any tax should be "flat and low like the prairie horizon."Moreover, he said Ottawa must give Manitoba credit for steps it's already taken to reduce carbon emissions, such as investing in clean hydroelectricity."We've put billions of dollars at risk to green up the environment and we deserve respect for that," Pallister said."We deserve to be respected for our green record. We do not deserve to be called climate-change deniers by anybody ... We want acceptance of our made-in-Manitoba green strategies."Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, who has been travelling the country meeting with premiers and others in a bid to mend some of the deep divisions exposed by the election, said she and the prime minister already have "lots of respect for Manitoba.""I hope (Pallister) would agree that we have a very effective, friendly working relationship with him and we really appreciate that," said Freeland, who is also the intergovernmental affairs minister. She sat in on Monday's meeting between the two leaders."Manitoba occupies an important and valued geographic position in the country. It's fair to describe Manitoba as being in the heart of the country and co-operating with the premier is really valuable to us."But extending that co-operation to watering down the federal carbon-pricing regime for Manitoba seems unlikely.Federal Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson was not enthusiastic Monday about crediting the province for past measures to reduce emissions."We have to be forward-looking with climate change," he said after making an announcement elsewhere in Winnipeg."At the end of the day, the challenge that we are facing is one of the emissions that exist today. We need to ... have plans as to how we're going to reduce the emissions that exist today on a go-forward basis."Trudeau's tete-a-tete with Pallister came on the second day of a three-day federal cabinet retreat, being held in Winnipeg in a bid to reach out to a region that spurned Trudeau's Liberals in the Oct. 21 election.The election reduced the Liberals to a minority. They were entirely shut out of Alberta and Saskatchewan, where Liberal environmental and climate policies are widely blamed for gutting the energy industry.Manitoba, where the Liberals lost three of seven seats, is somewhat friendlier turf.Pallister has signalled his willingness to work with Ottawa, in stark contrast to the other openly hostile Prairie premiers, Alberta's Jason Kenney and Saskatchewan's Scott Moe."We pride ourselves here on being Canadian first and we have the opportunity to, I think, partner in an improved way on several major files that I think Canadians will appreciate," Pallister said as he sat down with Trudeau.The Trudeau government has so far gotten little credit in the other Prairie provinces for its controversial decision to purchase the Trans Mountain pipeline to ensure plans for its expansion go ahead — a decision that cost Liberals support among environmentalists and progressive voters.But now that construction is actually underway and the Supreme Court last week cleared away another legal hurdle to the project, Natural Resources Minister Seamus O'Regan expressed hope Sunday that tempers will cool down a bit in the West.The expanded pipeline is to carry diluted bitumen from Alberta's oil sands to the British Columbia coast for export overseas.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 20, 2020.—With files from Steve LambertJoan Bryden, The Canadian Press

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    The biology of coffee, the world's most popular drink

    This article was originally published on The Conversation, an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts. Disclosure information is available on the original site.___Author: Thomas Merritt, Professor and Canada Research Chair, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian UniversityYou're reading this with a cup of coffee in your hand, aren't you? Coffee is the most popular drink in the world. Americans drink more coffee than soda, juice and tea — combined.How popular is coffee? When news first broke that Prince Harry and Meghan were considering Canada as their new home, Canadian coffee giant Tim Hortons offered free coffee for life as an extra enticement.Given coffee's popularity, it's surprising how much confusion surrounds how this hot, dark, nectar of the gods affects our biology.Coffee's ingredientsThe main biologically active ingredients in coffee are caffeine (a stimulant) and a suite of antioxidants. What do we know about how caffeine and antioxidants affect our bodies? The fundamentals are pretty simple, but the devil is in the details and the speculation around how coffee could either help or harm us runs a bit wild.The stimulant properties of caffeine mean that you can count on a cup of coffee to wake you up. In fact, coffee, or at least the caffeine it contains, is the most commonly used psychoactive drug in the world. It seems to work as a stimulant, at least in part, by blocking adenosine, which promotes sleep, from binding to its receptor.Caffeine and adenosine have similar ring structures. Caffeine acts as a molecular mimic, filling and blocking the adenosine receptor, preventing the body's natural ability to be able a rest when it's tired.This blocking is also the reason why too much coffee can leave you feeling jittery or sleepless. You can only postpone fatigue for so long before the body's regulatory systems begin to fail, leading to simple things like the jitters, but also more serious effects like anxiety or insomnia. Complications may be common; a possible link between coffee drinking and insomnia was identified more than 100 years ago.Unique responsesDifferent people respond to caffeine differently. At least some of this variation is from having different forms of that adenosine receptor, the molecule that caffeine binds to and blocks. There are likely other sites of genetic variation as well.There are individuals who don't process caffeine and to whom drinks like coffee could pose medical danger. Even away from those extremes, however, there is variation in how we respond to that cup of coffee. And, like much of biology, that variation is a function of environment, our past coffee consumption, genetics and, honestly, just random chance.We may be interested in coffee because of the oh-so-joyous caffeine buzz, but that doesn't mean that caffeine is the most biologically interesting aspect of a good cup of coffee.In one study using rats, caffeine triggered smooth muscle contraction, so it is possible that caffeine directly promotes bowel activity. Other studies, though, have shown that decaffeinated coffee can have as strong an effect on bowel activity as regular coffee, suggesting a more complex mechanism involving some of the other molecules in coffee.Antioxidant benefitsWhat about the antioxidants in coffee and the buzz that surrounds them? Things actually start out pretty straightforward. Metabolic processes produce the energy necessary for life, but they also create waste, often in the form of oxidized molecules that can be harmful in themselves or in damaging other molecules.Antioxidants are a broad group of molecules that can scrub up dangerous waste; all organisms produce antioxidants as part of their metabolic balance. It is unclear if supplementing our diet with additional antioxidants can augment these natural defences, but that hasn't stopped speculation.Antioxidants have been linked to almost everything, including premature ejaculation.Are any of the claims of positive effects substantiated? Surprisingly, the answer is again a resounding maybe.Coffee and cancerCoffee won't cure cancer, but it may help to prevent it and possibly other diseases as well. Part of answering the question of coffee's connection to cancer lies in asking another: what is cancer? At its simplest, cancer is uncontrolled cell growth, which is fundamentally about regulating when genes are, or are not, actively expressed.My research group studies gene regulation and I can tell you that even a good cup of coffee, or boost of caffeine, won't cause genes that are turned off or on at the wrong time to suddenly start playing by the rules.The antioxidants in coffee may actually have a cancer-fighting effect. Remember that antioxidants fight cellular damage. One type of damage that they may help reduce is mutations to DNA, and cancer is caused by mutations that lead to the misregulation of genes.Studies have shown that consuming coffee fights cancer in rats. Other studies in humans have shown that coffee consumption is associated with lower rates of some cancers.Interestingly, coffee consumption has also been linked to reduced rates of other diseases as well. Higher coffee consumption is linked to lower rates of Parkinson's disease and some other forms of dementia. Strikingly, at least one experimental study in mice and cell culture shows that protection is a function of a combination of caffeine and antioxidants in coffee.Higher coffee consumption has also been linked to lower rates of Type 2 diabetes. Complexity, combined effects and variation between individuals seems to be the theme across all the diseases.At the end of the day, where does all this leave us on the biology of coffee? Well, as I tell my students, it's complicated. But as most reading this already know, coffee will definitely wake you up in the morning.___This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Disclosure information is available on the original site. Read the original article:https://theconversation.com/the-biology-of-coffee-the-worlds-most-popular-drink-129179Thomas Merritt, Professor and Canada Research Chair, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University , The Canadian Press

  • Impassable road leaves Elliston house to burn after blizzard
    News
    CBC

    Impassable road leaves Elliston house to burn after blizzard

    Snow-covered roads blocked the path of firefighters in Elliston on Saturday morning, and left a home to burn in the community.Bonavista Mayor John Norman — whose fire department also serves Elliston — said firefighters responded to the call near the peak of the storm on Saturday morning, and couldn't make it to the fire in the nearby community in time."Elliston is about five minutes away, but municipal and provincial roads were completely impassable for emergency vehicles at the height of the storm," he told CBC Radio's Newfoundland Morning. "We could not reach the fire successfully, and the home was a complete loss."Despite the help of a snowplow, Norman said, there was a similar challenge with calls for an ambulance during the storm."Thankfully, during the storm, they were not severe calls of a very extreme or serious nature. But attempts to reach one home in particular during the storm with plows and ambulance failed."Elliston's deputy mayor, Geraldine Baker, said when firefighters eventually arrived, the house was almost totally destroyed, and neighbouring houses were in danger as well.She said the two people living inside the burnt-out home got out safely, and have been offered a place to stay in rental accommodations in the town.Baker complimented the firefighters and plow drivers for their work during the challenging situation.The Town of Bonavista declared a state of emergency Friday afternoon, during the storm. Winds gusted to 164 km/h during the weekend, and waves broke over the seawall that protects land in Bonavista.Norman called the damage to the seawall "the most notable damage, and those that had me up and concerned for many hours, making lots of calls.""In some cases, significant land lost. Ten, 12, up to 15 feet of land has disappeared in this one storm," he said. "So of course I've been sending out messages to those government offices looking for some provincial and federal support as quickly as possible on the engineering issues around that." The sea spray also covered several homes, and the water froze into ice on some.Norman said the seawall was breached in six different places, and estimated the cost of repairs at more than a million dollars.He said he was looking for federal government to help pay for the damages.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Sahtú gathers in Colville Lake to develop new plan for caribou harvest
    News
    CBC

    Sahtú gathers in Colville Lake to develop new plan for caribou harvest

    For the next five days, Colville Lake, N.W.T., is the centre of the Sahtú.Leaders from across the region and the North are gathering in the community for a three-day public "listening session" on how to protect three of the territory's caribou herds.The Bluenose West and Bluenose East barren ground caribou herds were the subject of conservation hearings in 2007 and 2016 respectively. The Northern Mountain herd, a species of woodland caribou, has been considered at risk since 2005.This week's hearing is the first time multiple herds will be discussed in a single session, according to Deborah Simmons, the executive director of the Sahtú Renewable Resources Board (SRRB), which organized the session."The board is aware of conservation concerns for all the kinds of caribou that are living in our Sahtú region," she said. "We've broadened the net."Simmons says the board is hoping the sessions are less rushed than those in 2016, and allow for a broader range of evidence that better reflects the experience of the communities that rely on the caribou and share a historic relationship with the herds.For Colville Lake Chief Wilbert Kochon, it's all "one herd" — but one in need of a new, less "colonial" approach to conservation.The hearing will open with the presentation of Colville Lake's locally drafted caribou management plan, which follows Délı̨nę's 2016 plan in basing conservation strategies on traditional Dene law."I'm hoping that … people will listen to what we're doing," said Kochon.End to 'control and criminalization'The session is the first organized by the SRRB since 2016, when a hearing on the Bluenose East herd resulted in strict limits on harvests as the herd faced rapid population decline.Colville Lake criticized those limits at the time as "racist and dangerous," arguing the cap wrongly blamed the herd's decline on Indigenous hunting, and ignored other influences like climate change, resource developments, and natural population cycles.That hearing also resulted in an endorsement for Délı̨nę's local management plan, which enforces traditional hunting methods and educates hunters on the sacred relationship between the community and the herd.Colville Lake's plan echoes Délı̨nę's in basing conservation controls on a traditional respect for the animals. It calls the existing system of tags and quotas an "unprecedented colonial system of control and criminalization of Indigenous hunting.""For many years, [the Crown] thought that only their laws mattered," an advanced copy of Tuesday's presentation on the plan reads."Self-regulation in accordance with community conservation plans is a more effective means of conservation than Wildlife Act regulations and enforcement."Disputed factsSince the 2016 hearing, the estimated size of the Bluenose East herd has dropped by nearly half, and the harvest has been capped at fewer than 200 animals. But Kochon and other leaders have at times criticized the counting methods employed by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The text of Colville Lake's plan suggests the department relies too heavily on population counts for assessing the overall health of the herd, a method it calls "reactive" and "ineffective."In its place, it proposes "a more holistic and traditional approach to conservation … [based] on local and ground-based knowledge and advice, with the inclusion of science to fill gaps as deemed helpful."Both the Délı̨nę and Colville Lake plans rely primarily on volunteer reporting to measure the health of the herd. That has led some wildlife authorities to criticize local renewable resource councils for the quality of the data they gather on annual harvests.In a submission to the hearing from the Wildlife Management Advisory Council of the N.W.T., Larry Carpenter, the chair, wrote that the council would "limit their participation" in the board's hearings until they received better data from the SRRB.Since a 2007 hearing on the Bluenose West herd, "there have been no noticeable improvements in the sharing of harvest information from communities within the Sahtú with wildlife co-management partners," it reads.Improving how data on the herds and the harvest is shared between the dozen or so parties will be one major focus of the hearings, Simmons said.Decisions, decisionsColville Lake will not be alone in making the case for local management. They'll be supported by submissions from the Ross River Dena Council, which is fighting the Yukon government to establish a local licensing system for hunting caribou.But not every local authority is in opposition to the government. The session will also include remarks from the Inuvialuit Game Council, which has had a much more positive working history."We have a very robust monitoring system here in the [Inuvialuit Settlement Region] where we … abide by the letter of the law," said Vernon Amos, the chair of the Inuvialuit Game Council. "We just want to … really try to reinforce that they should be following that too and abiding with the rules and regulations."Both ENR and local authorities agree Indigenous knowledge should play a much larger role in guiding conservation efforts. Both see hunter education as crucial to ensuring the traditional respect survives.Ultimately, what the SRRB heard in their listening session won't be clear until March 31, when it releases its list of resulting decisions.It could be a long time until those decisions have an effect. More than four years on from Délı̨nę's plan, ENR is still "consider[ing] the issue" of amending the Wildlife Act to incorporate the plan, according to a submission to the hearing.It's also just the first of five hearings to be held in each of the Sahtú's communities. A tentative schedule indicates it might be five years until they're all done."We do know that there are some urgent decisions that need to be made," said Simmons. "If the process is rushed too much," she said, "the risk is that we don't have the evidence needed for decisions."

  • Public hearings into $1B Giant Mine remediation begin at last
    News
    CBC

    Public hearings into $1B Giant Mine remediation begin at last

    Public hearings on the closure and remediation plan for Yellowknife's defunct Giant Mine begin Monday. That's after 13 years of study, planning, assessment and discussion."It's monumental," said Natalie Plato, deputy director of the Giant Mine Remediation Project, which is leading the cleanup.The project is seeking a water licence for a 20-year term and a land use permit for a five-year term from the Mackenzie Valley Land and Water Board. If all goes well, Plato anticipates that her group could have those permits — along with terms and conditions — as soon as this summer, and start work on the cleanup project in 2020/2021."It means we can actually start the work and get this site remediated," Plato said.A toxic legacyThe Giant mine site, which sits within the boundaries of the City of Yellowknife, is one of the most contaminated sites in Canada.From 1948 until 2004, gold from Giant Mine was a major economic driver for Yellowknife and the N.W.T. The mine became the property of the government of Canada in 1999, when Royal Oak Mines Inc. went into receivership. It operated for another five years before closing for good. The closure and remediation plan first and foremost addresses 237,000 tonnes of highly toxic arsenic trioxide left behind. The plan is to freeze the waste underground, forever, using thermosyphon technology.The cleanup will also fill old pits, cover up tailings ponds and build a new water treatment plant so that runoff water can be treated before being discharged. It will also see the cleanup of the former Giant Mine townsite, on the shore of Back Bay, as well as the future site of a mining heritage museum. "Our pitch is to make the site safer for the environment and the public," said Plato. A billion-dollar planIn 2007, when the plan was first presented and before an environmental assessment was ordered, it came with a price tag of $947 million, which was frequently rounded up to $1 billion. Plato said she expects that number to be revised once the terms and conditions of the water licence are made clear. Most of the details of the cleanup plan have already been reviewed by stakeholders and discussed at length during two technical sessions and a "closure criteria" workshop. Stakeholders — from the Yellowknives Dene First Nation to Fisheries and Oceans Canada — have already filed their evidence, all of which is available on the land and water board's public registry. "There has been a lot of work done up until this point," said Shelagh Montgomery, executive director of the Mackenzie Valley Land and Water Board.No full agreement yetThe enormous project is not without controversy. "While we support the overall goals of the Project, in its current form, the water licence process is not capable of accommodating the YKDFN's rights," reads the opening slide of a presentation from the Yellowknives Dene First Nation. The First Nation is still seeking compensation and an apology for the damage caused by the mine. It also fears that Baker Creek, which runs through the site, will not be returned to its full health, and that the Yellowknives will be shut out of environmental monitoring to follow the remediation unless more is done to train and build capacity among First Nation members.The City of Yellowknife also has concerns.  There are opportunities associated with the remediation, and those benefits should accrue here. \- Sheila Bassi-Kellett, Yellowknife city administrator"The project's responses to the City's outstanding concerns have mostly refused to acknowledge validity of the concerns and a consequential absence of effort in addressing them," reads a slide the city will present this week. "Rather than working to resolve the issue, the project's effort has been in denying their applicability or value."City Administrator Sheila Bassi-Kellett is most concerned with the socio-economic impact of the cleanup. In particular, maximizing the business and employment opportunities for Yellowknifers and the Yellowknives Dene. "This is a complex project," she said. "There are opportunities associated with the remediation and those benefits should accrue here given the legacy of the project for the region."Bassi-Kellett notes that the mine site takes up about seven per cent of the land within the city's municipal boundary, presenting unique opportunities. "It's not like it's 350 miles away." But no matter what happens, Bassi-Kellett said this week's hearings are significant. "This is huge," said Bassi-Kellett. "If there is an opportunity now — which we believe there is — to find some good to come out of the mine, we really want to see that happen."The hearings will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday in the Caribou Room at the Chateau Nova hotel, most of it taken up by registered inteveners. Evening sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday are reserved for public comments and questions (though the public is invited to attend all sessions).The full agenda can be viewed on the Mackenzie Valley Land and Water Board website.

  • Is sugar shrinking your brain?
    Global News

    Is sugar shrinking your brain?

    Dr. Mike Dow explains why he says sugar is shrinking your brain and what you can do to fight it.

  • 'I might not have come home': Flying ice injures Cobden man
    News
    CBC

    'I might not have come home': Flying ice injures Cobden man

    Martin Burger is hoping motorists will start clearing off their vehicles after a flying chunk of ice from an oncoming car left him bruised and bloodied Thursday evening. The Cobden, Ont., man and his 16-year-old son, Clark, were heading west on Highway 17 when several vehicles passed in the oncoming lane near the turnoff for Storyland Road.Burger noticed a chunk of ice about 30 centimetres square and eight centimetres thick spinning through the air toward his Hondo Pilot."As I watched the ice come, heard it hit, saw the windshield shatter, I did not anticipate it coming through the windshield at all," he told CBC.But the ice did smash through the glass, striking Burger square in the face.Burger somehow managed to maintain control of his SUV and steered it safely off the road. Paramedics arrived and transported him to Renfrew, Ont., for medical care. A large gash on the Burger's forehead required eight stitches, and he needed additional stitches on his right eyelid. His right pupil is dilated to twice the size of his left one, but it's believed he'll make a full recovery, Burger said. Burger is thankful he was the one driving and not Clark, who recently received his beginner's licence. He said he had considered giving his son some practice time behind the wheel as they passed Renfrew, but decided against it.Photos taken soon after the incident show a triangular hole in his windshield. Burger has since found shards of glass all the way at the back of his SUV. Clark was unscathed. "He does mention once in a while that when he closes his eyes he replays the situation," Burger said. "But he is doing well. He'll be fine." Burger is hoping the incident will serve as a reminder to motorists to take a moment to clear ice and snow from their vehicles before hitting the road."I want to help prevent someone else from going through the same thing that I did," he said. "I am very fortunate that I am actually here able to speak to you. It could have been a lot worse. I may not have come home."

  • News
    CBC

    2 dead in Harbour Grace following historic Newfoundland storm, mayor says

    Harbour Grace, N.L., is mourning the loss of two men in the wake of Friday's historic storm.Bud Chafe, 83, died suddenly Saturday after shovelling out his home. Rupert Crocker also died over the weekend, reportedly following his own shoveling attempt.It's not clear whether their deaths are related to exertion from snow clearing.Mayor Don Coombs said he knew both of them well.It's a "hard weekend for everybody," Coombs said. "Two great men left great legacies."Coombs said fire crews responded to Crocker on snowmobiles, but the causes of death aren't yet known and Coombs couldn't say whether the deaths were connected to shoveling out after Friday's blizzard.He described the men as fixtures of Harbour Grace, which has a population of about 3,000. "Bud was a legacy in the town. He was bigger than life," Coombs said.He added most people would be familiar with Chafe through his contributions to the Harbour Grace Regatta — and if not, they may have seen his name emblazoned on the regatta boathouse.Chafe was also a stalwart of the province's minor hockey scene, and had a major hand in cultivating a girls' hockey presence on the Avalon.Chafe also served two terms on town council. Coombs recalls his dedication to the community, like the time he saved a historic one-room schoolhouse, rolling it up on logs to another site rather than leaving it to rot where it stood."He was about family, he was about commitment, he was about kids in the region … and wanting things for the children," the mayor said."The things he did will go on for a long, long while."Chafe's family asked in his obituary that donations in his memory may be made to the Harbour Grace Regatta.Rupert, also known as "Rocket," was well-known as an entertainer.He gained local notoriety from his role in Terra Nova Shoes commercials."The town of Harbour Grace is a better place because of Bud Chafe and Rupert Crocker," Coombs said. No confirmed casualtiesThe blizzard that brought eastern Newfoundland to its knees hasn't been confirmed to have claimed any lives.A number of house fires broke out in the days following the storm, with all inhabitants accounted for.A 26-year-old from Roaches Line remains missing after he ventured out during the storm. Search and rescue operations are ongoing.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • News
    CBC

    Sask hotel association to offer training to prevent human trafficking

    Saskatchewan hotel owners want to do their part to prevent human trafficking, says the head of their professional association.The Saskatchewan Hotel and Hospitality Association will soon be offering training on the subject to its members, said CEO and president Jim Bence.Participants will learn how to recognize the signs of human trafficking, Bence said. This could include guests who request a room near exits or older men who check in with more than one younger woman.Bence said many of his members have already expressed support for the training."We're really happy and excited with the different people that have phoned and sent emails and are really saying, 'How can we help?'" he said.Bence said he's been talking to police forces and political leaders across the province and is confident everyone can work together."The responsibility, I think, really lies with all of us. And it's the right thing to do," he said.

  • Swartz Bay ferry terminal reopens after pipeline protesters delay sailings
    News
    CBC

    Swartz Bay ferry terminal reopens after pipeline protesters delay sailings

    The Swartz Bay ferry terminal near Victoria has reopened after a protest blocked access and delayed a number of sailings early Monday. The demonstration began before dawn, delaying 7 a.m. crossings from Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen for more than an hour. The sailing from Tsawwassen eventually left the terminal around 8:10 a.m., but a later crossing was cancelled altogether.A statement from a group, which did not identify itself, said the demonstration is in support of Wet'suwet'en members opposing the Coastal GasLink pipeline in northern B.C.The terminal reopened as the protest ended around 9 a.m., and traffic started flowing again. BC Ferries said all sailings leaving Swartz Bay would be delayed until traffic on Highway 17 has cleared.BC Ferries spokesperson Deborah Marshall said the protest blocked the inbound lanes to the Swartz Bay terminal, but there was also "concern" that kayaks might have been in the water.Passengers driving to get to the fare booths ahead of the sailings were stuck in gridlocked traffic. Sidney RCMP were also on scene.Anne Roberge had a reservation for the 7 a.m. sailing and couldn't get close to the terminal."At one point we said, 'Oh boy. That doesn't look good,'" she said, speaking by phone from her spot in traffic.Coastal GasLink is building a 670-kilometre pipeline from northeast B.C. to Kitimat on the coast. The project runs through Wet'suwet'en traditional territory.The company has signed agreements with all 20 elected First Nation councils along its path, but five hereditary chiefs say the project has no authority without their consent.Last week, RCMP blocked access to Wet'suwet'en territory, heightening tensions between government officials and hereditary chiefs. The Mounties have increased their presence in the area, setting up a checkpoint and restricting access along a service road that leads to three sites where the Wet'suwet'en are maintaining a presence. Kolin Sutherland-Wilson, a spokesperson for the Swartz Bay demonstration, said the grassroots protest was comprised of young people, students and Indigenous allies from across the province."I hope it makes a statement because what's happening up north is disheartening ... our way of life is being criminalized by the province," said Sutherland-Wilson, a UVic student who is from the Gitxsan First Nation — a neighbouring nation and ally to the Wet'suwet'en Nation."We just couldn't sit down. Something had to be said."

  • News
    CBC

    City of Regina may reinstate tax exemption for non-profit homes

    Some non-profit housing providers in Regina may be getting back a tax exemption that the city suspended in 2019.The Affordable Home Ownership Capital Grant & Tax Exemption program — under the housing incentives policy — was expected to be suspended until the end of 2020 but the city will be discussing the suspension at the Mayor's Housing Commission meeting on Jan. 20 at 4 p.m. CST.The tax exemption was created to help increase the number of homes on the market but home prices slumped in Regina by 4.6 per cent due to an oversupply in 2019, according to the the Canadian Real Estate Association.Early in 2019, the city suspended the tax exemption for one year, with the option to review if the exemption was necessary at a later date. Pending a discussion Monday, the suspension may no longer apply to non-profit housing providers in new and developing neighbourhoods, including Uplands, Sherwood Park, Prairie View, Dewdney East and Arcola East.The city says this is because non-profit housing providers have proven they can complete affordable homes with an immediate rebate as long as they have entered a legal agreement with the city. The city also noted there are other incentives to build a home, including the National Housing Co-Investment Fund launched in November 2017 and the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation's First Time Home Buyer Incentive program.

  • Indigenous ‘Molly of Denali’ is more than a cartoon for some
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Indigenous ‘Molly of Denali’ is more than a cartoon for some

    Charitie Ropati watched the pilot episode of “Molly of Denali” in her Columbia University dorm room, huddled around a computer screen with friends.“We were crying,” Ropati said. “We realized we finally had positive representation.”“Molly of Denali” is the first cartoon series with an Alaska Native character as the lead. It premiered nationwide on PBS Kids in July.For many, it is more than a cartoon.“Watching the show is a way for my Native friends and I to bond,” said 18-year-old Ropati, Yup’ik, who had just moved to New York City from Anchorage and was feeling homesick when the pilot aired. “PBS did such a good job. It is like my siblings, Native youth and myself can see ourselves in it.”The series, in its first season, has Indigenous input at all levels of production, Indian Country Today reported. It includes 38 episodes, a podcast series and a collection of paperback books.Dorothea Gillim is the series' executive producer, a position she also held on “Curious George.” After working in the industry for many years, she says this program is special.“I’ve never worked on a show where people tear up on a regular basis,” Gillim said.Gillim says she recently heard about a non-Native family who wanted to make a trip to Alaska after watching the show. They called the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce to learn more about Alaska Native languages to prepare for their trip.Her job as executive producer is multifaceted. She raises money for the show while leading a close-knit team. And she was also involved at the earliest moments of the show to choose writers, producers, animators, and voice actors.One of the talents she gathered was Princess Johnson, Neets’aii Gwich’in. Johnson is the creative producer of “Molly of Denali.”Part of Johnson’s job is to advocate for Indigenous representation at every level of the creative process. This means making sure things are done “right” in every episode, interstitial (a short-program shown between episodes that features Alaska Native children), online tools, games and podcast. She also ensures Alaska Natives are included as writers, actors and producers.A job like this didn’t always exist.There are serious implications to many non-Native people creating media about Native people, a 2018 IllumiNative report says. “The story they adopt is overwhelmingly one of deficit and disparity,” the report states. “This narrative can undermine relationships with other communities of colour.”Many say “Molly of Denali” challenges that.The series was developed with a group of over 60 established Alaska Native or Indigenous advisers. The advisers are from every region of Alaska where the show takes place. For every character that is Native, their voice actor is Native too.Beyond this, there is also a fellowship program for Alaska Native writers. Atomic Cartoons, the lead animation company of the series, holds internships for Alaska Natives.Vera Starbard, Tlingit and Dena’ina, is a writer for “Molly.” She says she has worked on many artistic projects that involve Alaska Native people. “I’ve never experienced this level of dedication to getting it right,” she said.“Usually my job comes with emotional labour of having to educate others,” Starbard said. “This time ... my job is just to write.”Starbard says something surprising is how much work happens behind the scenes.Here’s a little bit of how the process works: Writers think of a potential story they pitch to a producer. If their pitch is accepted, they work through many rounds of edits. Writers must decide who the characters are, where the story takes place and what informational text will go into an episode. They have to write every word that a character speaks including where they chuckle or show forms of expression.After a script is approved and “polished,” it is sent to directors and animators. “And then I don’t see the story again until it airs,” Starbard says.This entire process takes a while. Starbard’s first episode took 18 months before it aired. Because the show is in its first season, animators are tasked with creating entire new towns, characters and worlds.Starbard has written four episodes so far. She says her life experiences inspire her story ideas. When writing “New Nivagi,” an 11-minute story that follows “Molly” while she gathers items to make her grandpa’s secret ice cream recipe, she says it reflected an experience she knows.Starbard grew up in Alaska and says she had to be “pretty creative” to make recipes because sometimes it is hard to find ingredients. So she wrote an entire episode where “Molly” does the same.Producers of the show use other liberties to showcase Alaska’s diversity. One of “Molly’s” best friends is Tooey Ookami, a 10-year-old boy who is Koyukon, Yup’ik and Japanese. The other is Trini Mumford, a 7-year-old African American girl.“We wanted to reflect the true diversity of Alaska and the public media,” said Johnson. Alaska is home to 229 tribes.Johnson says it is especially heartwarming to hear about people’s reaction to the show.Johnson remembers being in Anchorage when a young girl’s mother approached her to say they recently went to a “Molly” screening. After it was over, her daughter was looking through her closet to find her kuspuk (a hooded shirt with large front pockets) because Molly wore her kuspuk in the show.Another time Johnson remembers being at a children’s museum when a mother said her son was showing interest in his Inupiaq culture because of the show.“That is the ultimate goal,” says Johnson. “It is a joy to see that sort of reaction.”And the reactions are from non-Native people too. Johnson heard a story from a friend’s son who watched the show and asked what an ancestor was.“When I go back to the beginning when I first heard of the show I knew the potential impact that the show could have,” said Johnson. She says it has been worth it because of that.During Halloween, the show released a graphic informing viewers how to dress like “Molly.” They were especially cognizant of not telling people to wear her traditional regalia. Instead they encouraged viewers to wear a brown coat and boots, blue jeans and pink mittens. The graphic received traction on social media. It was liked more than a thousand times on Twitter.Professionally, the opportunity to play a part in the production has opened doors for writers like Starbard. She says she was established in Alaska before “Molly” and now she’s considered a national writer.Starbard said: “This is the definition of a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”___ Information from: Indian Country Today, https://newsmaven.io/indiancountrytoday/Aliyah Chavez, The Associated Press

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Yukon inquest into 2013 death to probe issues of health care to First Nations

    WHITEHORSE — A coroner's inquest gets underway in Yukon more than six years after the death of a 29-year-old who repeatedly sought medical attention in the days before she died.Cynthia Blackjack of the Little Salmon Carmacks First Nation died while being rushed by plane to Whitehorse in November 2013.The inquest begins today in Carmacks, where Blackjack visited and called the local health centre numerous times as she suffered various health problems including intense abdominal pain.The day before she died, she was finally given a tentative diagnosis of alcohol-induced gastritis and advised to seek medical attention in Whitehorse, but had no way of making the nearly 200-kilometre trip.Blackjack collapsed the next day but various issues delayed her transfer to Whitehorse for nearly 12 hours and she was pronounced dead shortly after the medevac flight reached the territorial capital.The First Nation and Blackjack's family argued issues of health-care delivery to Indigenous residents should be examined in an inquest but Yukon's former chief coroner refused until the Yukon Court of Appeal upheld a lower court ruling in 2018, ordering the inquiry to proceed.A six-person jury was selected Friday and will hear two days of evidence in Carmacks before the inquest moves to Whitehorse on Wednesday.Chief Judge Peter Chisholm of the Territorial Court of Yukon presides over the hearing, which is expected to continue until Jan. 31. (CKRW)This story from The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 20, 2020The Canadian Press

  • Brother and sister find shared success in filmmaking
    News
    CBC

    Brother and sister find shared success in filmmaking

    Kennlin Barlow remembers the moment he first thought of becoming a filmmaker.It was his older sister, Natasha Barlow, who inspired him. She sparked his interest in moving pictures by showing the four-year-old Bride of Chucky."Even though it scared the living hell out of me, after that I just couldn't stop watching movies," said Kennlin."In retrospect, I probably would never show a four-year-old a horror movie like that now, but I was a teenager at the time," said Natasha.Decades later, the two are a brother-and-sister team. Both filmmakers in their own right, they help each other out with filming and acting.Now both of them have found an outlet to screen their films.Films from both of them have been selected for St. Thomas University's Indigenous Film Festival, which begins at the end of the month.Natasha said it's exciting for the Indian Island First Nation, outside Richibucto, duo."I never thought something like this could happen," she said.She said film has always been something that's connected the two, even though she only recently found out the extent of that connection."I had never realized probably until the last year that he used to steal my movies," she said. "He would then quote them and I didn't realize like he had watched some of my films."Laughing and cryingIt's not always easy working with family, however.Natasha said sometimes it can be hard to get any work done, especially when the two of them start laughing."We love to laugh when we get together, so sometimes there's been instances when it's taken us a little longer to complete projects," she said.But it's not always laughing that keeps the pair form working well.Kennlin recalls a time when he cut much of his sister's performance from his film Mancanti. He had insecurities over the script."I wasn't happy with the script I wrote I unfortunately cut it out," said Kennlin. "That decision did not feel good."Natasha admits she wasn't happy, especially considering she had to memorize lines of dialogue.But she now looks back at the dispute as a teaching moment."I find it very funny now," said Natasha. "If I have to memorize anything I guess I'll be a little more aware that things will change with Kennlin."DifferencesThe feeling of love and deep respect between the two is apparent. This comes, in no small part, from their different approaches to filmmaking.Natasha calls her brother a "creative genius" for his avant-garde, non-narrative approach to film."I just want people to see how great he is," said Natasha. "It bothers me when people do not understand his vision."Meanwhile, Kennlin considers his sister fundamental to his filmmaking, noting that while her filmmaking could be considered more mainstream and conventional, she is willing to broach subjects he still finds difficult even to talk about."My topics have never really been focused on Indigenous issues," said Kennlin. "My sister is a lot braver when it comes to that."

  • News
    CBC

    Education minister seeks public feedback on proposed school reforms

    Education Minister Dominic Cardy is taking his green paper on tour to find out what people around the province think about education reforms.Cardy's green paper on education reform was published last fall. The 25-page document discusses eliminating grade levels, more use of artificial intelligence in the classroom, more partnerships with the private sector to boost education in the trades and the introduction of second-language programming in daycares."This can't be just politicians saying, 'We should do this,'" Cardy said. "It has to be a conversation with the public because it's their education system, their children and our province's future at stake with this."The consultation sessions will give students, teachers, parents, school employees and community partners a chance to meet with Cardy and bring forward any concerns.  Parents express concernsSome of those concerns include the possibility of eliminating a grade system. Cardy admits parents have expressed concern over the elimination of a grade level system, which could negatively impact students with special needs. But Cardy says that won't happen.   "I'll be reassuring folks that absolutely not, that's not the case. But I wouldn't be surprised if that comes up."  He's also anticipating fielding questions about second-language training and French immersion in the province. This comes after the Telegraph-Journal released a report earlier this month, claiming Cardy planned to scrap French immersion. Cardy called the report inaccurate and said no other changes beyond those mentioned in the green paper are in the works. People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin was mentioned in the article saying he had been in secret talks with Cardy and Premier Blaine Higgs about doing away with the program. Cardy called Austin's comments "inaccurate" and "irresponsible." Cardy has not yet spoken with Austin about the debacle.Upcoming consultation sessionsPublic consultation sessions will take place from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m in the following eight locations:  * Sackville at the Sackville Town Hall council chambers (in English) on Jan. 23 * Edmundston at Cité des Jeunes A.-M.-Sormany (in French) on Jan. 29 * Saint John at Harbour View High School (in English) on Feb. 4  * Riverview at Riverview High School (in English) on Feb. 5  * Moncton at École L'Odyssée (in French) on Feb. 6 * Fredericton at Fredericton High School (in English) on Feb. 10 * Miramichi at Miramichi Valley High School (in English) on Feb. 11 * Tracadie at Polyvalente W.-Arthur-Losier (in French) on Feb. 12Consultations will be rescheduled to Feb. 13, 18 or 19 if there is a storm. Cardy received overwhelming response from people who attended the three-day education summit held last fall.Cardy also wants to hear from students. The fall summit took place during the work week and during school hours, making it difficult for students to attend."I'm open to listen to anyone."

  • Edmonton liquor store to combat crime by requiring customers to scan ID before entering
    News
    CBC

    Edmonton liquor store to combat crime by requiring customers to scan ID before entering

    With liquor store thefts on the rise, an Edmonton-based liquor retailer will test a new security program in which customers must scan their ID before they can enter the premises. The pilot project, being launched by Alcanna — the largest private alcohol retailer in Canada — in partnership with Edmonton police, will see an ID scanner installed at an Ace Liquor store at 11708 34th St. in northeast Edmonton.In its news release, Alcanna said the intent of the project is to combat "the epidemic of liquor store robberies that has plagued the city," which has seen a dramatic escalation in the number of liquor store robberies over the last 18 months."In 2019, EPS officers responded to almost 9,600 calls of theft of liquor — about 26 calls per day across the city," Const. Robin Wilson said in the release.That was a 200-per-cent increase in liquor store thefts over 2018, he said.Edmonton police Chief Dale McFee told CBC News last month that liquor thefts are a huge problem for police, and investigators have found that some of the thefts are gang-related."It's not just people taking advantage of something that is easy, it's somebody preying on people as well," he said."Ultimately, the way we are right now and the amount of officer time and different things that are going on in this space, it's not working. So it's time to try a few things."The scan system, from company Patronscan, requires customers to scan identification before the door unlocks and allows entry into the store.Bars and nightclubs in Edmonton have been using personal identification scanners for years.The provincial government announced Monday it has established a working group, chaired by MLA Brad Rutherford, to examine the recent spike in crimes targeting liquor stores."This is an important crime and safety issue that requires thoughtful action," said Rutherford, who was a member of the Edmonton Police Service for 10 years.The group will weigh a broad range of actions to deter liquor store thefts, including security features for stores, enforcement strategies, legal measures and deterrence measures, as well as steps taken in other jurisdictions.Safety issueThe growing number of liquor store thefts is placing a "tremendous" strain on police resources, Wilson said. She welcomed the pilot project and commended Alcanna for "taking proactive steps to increase the safety of both their employees and the general public" through the implementation of ID scanning.A CBC reporter asked some Edmontonians about the scanning pilot Monday in Churchill Square downtown.Tim Campbell said he thought customers might have issues with the idea but businesses might see benefits."Some people, I could see them being opposed to having their information scanned as they go in, they might see that as a privacy issue," Campbell said. "However, if we're protecting the small businesses to mitigate theft, I think that's a good idea."The move seems "somewhat reactionary," said Twyla Erickson."Everyone has a right to anonymity while shopping and while they go about their daily business," Erickson said.A privacy expert also voiced concerns about consumers' rights. Scanning IDs presumes that everyone is potentially violent or a thief, said Sharon Polsky, president of the Privacy and Access Council of Canada."What sort of a society have we become where everybody meekly accepts a demand for papers please, before any transaction can happen, before you're allowed in a commercial store?" Polsky said in an interview with CBC News.There are also questions around access, she said.Some people may not have government-issue identification, and tourists may have identification that the scanner doesn't recognize, she said."The public relations nightmare that could create could be problematic," Polsky said.'This is not shoplifting'In addition to Ace Liquor, Alcanna also owns the Liquor Depot, Wine and Beyond and Nova Cannabis brands."Just as was done with pre-pay and pay at the pump for gas stations, we are hoping Patronscan creates a safer shopping experience," Joe Cook, Alcanna's vice-president for loss prevention, said in the news release."This is not shoplifting," he said. "It is robbery with real or threatened violence."Along with the safety issues, Cook said the robberies are costing millions of dollars, "as well as fuelling the drug trade and organized crime gangs."Customer ID information will not be kept in the devices but stored in Patronscan's data centre with restricted access, the release said.

  • A 2-month wait to fix his 2 front teeth: The problem with the Ontario seniors dental program
    News
    CBC

    A 2-month wait to fix his 2 front teeth: The problem with the Ontario seniors dental program

    A 73-year-old Windsorite is worried he might lose some of his teeth while he waits to be seen by a government-funded dentist.The Ontario Seniors Dental Care Program (OSDCP) allows low-income seniors to visit a dentist for free, but the paperwork and few approved dentists mean there's a lengthy wait. The program was announced in June 2019 but only launched the application system at the end of November.For Rogers Villeford, he's already spent six months with bleeding gums — and just last week another filling fell out. "I've had this for about six months ... every day I bleed," said Villeford. "I take mouthwash and keep it in there awhile and swish it ... every morning I spit out blood." Villeford's income is about $18,000 a year. He was accepted into the OSDCP, but the appointment he was given is nearly two months away. "What good are [the dentists] if you have to wait?" said Villeford.Locally the OSDCP is run by the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit. According to the director of health promotion, dentists under the program started seeing patients two weeks ago. "Our first senior seen under the program was January 6," said Nicole Dupuis. Dupuis said so far the program has seen about 15 patients, with another 46 appointments already booked. Appointment bookings are as far away as March.According to Dupuis it takes about one month between filling out the application to receiving a card that gives you access to the program. After the card comes in, seniors can book an appointment — but the first appointment is typically just a consultation. "We'll have more appointment times going forward," said Dupuis. "We have had a wait list in our clinics ... a month is actually not too bad. We hope it won't get too much longer beyond that time frame."Villeford decided he can't wait that long, so he made an appointment with a dentist — but he'll have to pay out of pocket for his treatment. "I don't want to lose my two front teeth," said Villeford, who expects to spend about $500 on the visit. "It's a sham."Similar to the Healthy Smiles Ontario program, there is an emergency service that might be available for people who need immediate treatment. To get emergency dental care, seniors would have to fill out a form signed by their medical provider that states they need treatment right away. Villeford said the WECHU gave him an emergency appointment for Tuesday, but it won't include any work like fillings. Instead it will be to address what the health unit might consider are more serious problems.

  • Prince wrongful death case dismissed; estate case continues
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Prince wrongful death case dismissed; estate case continues

    MINNEAPOLIS — A wrongful death lawsuit filed by Prince's family members has been quietly dismissed in recent months, suggesting family members have reached settlements with defendants including the Minnesota doctor who saw Prince in the weeks before his death and the Illinois hospital that treated him for an opioid overdose seven days before he died.The dismissals largely close one legal chapter in the superstar's legacy, even as efforts drag on to value and dispose of his estate once pegged at around $200 million.Prince was 57 when he died of an accidental fentanyl overdose on April 21, 2016, without leaving a will. No one was criminally charged in his death and the source of the counterfeit pills that killed him remains unknown.Prince’s heirs filed a wrongful death lawsuit against a slew of defendants in April 2018, alleging they had the duty and opportunity to diagnose and treat Prince's addiction and prevent his death, but failed to do so.But as early as last summer, plaintiffs began dismissing defendants.Claims against Dr. Michael Schulenberg — a doctor who treated Prince in the weeks before his death — were permanently dismissed in November, along with claims against Schulenberg’s former employer. Both sides agreed to the dismissals.Claims against Walgreens, which filled prescriptions for Prince, and Trinity Medical Center, the Illinois hospital where Prince was treated for an opioid overdose a week before he died, were also permanently dismissed in August by agreement.Attorneys in the case either declined comment or did not return messages to The Associated Press. But Henry Blair, a professor at Mitchell Hamline School of Law in St. Paul, Minnesota, said the dismissal language — with agreement by defendants and plaintiffs — leaves him “99.99% sure those are settlements.”A medical negligence claim against Howard Kornfeld, a California addiction specialist who was contacted by Prince’s associates before he died, was dismissed by a judge in September, but remains alive on appeal. Prince’s family says Kornfeld had a duty to advise Prince’s associates that he should be immediately admitted for treatment. But the judge found no evidence that Kornfeld ever communicated with Prince or that a doctor-patient relationship was established.An autopsy found Prince overdosed on fentanyl. Authorities said it was likely Prince didn't know he was taking the synthetic opioid that is 50 times more powerful than heroin.Authorities said Schulenberg admitted prescribing the opioid oxycodone to Prince’s bodyguard in the days before Prince died, knowing the drug would go to Prince. He disputes that allegation, although he paid $30,000 to settle a federal civil violation alleging the drug was prescribed illegally.The bodyguard, Kirk Johnson, was deposed during the wrongful death litigation, but refused to answer nearly all of the questions, according to a transcript.Meanwhile, Prince's siblings are still waiting to learn how much his estate is worth. Court filings several months after Prince's death suggested the estate was worth around $200 million before taxes. More recent filings suggest the estate and Internal Revenue Service have not yet agreed on its value.Protracted litigation isn't unusual for big estates, even when there is a will. The fight between pop superstar Michael Jackson's estate and the IRS over valuing his estate continues in federal tax court, even though he died in 2009.The lengthy proceedings are stretching some of the siblings' resources. In recent months, one of Prince's sisters, Tyka Nelson, sold a portion of her share of the estate for an undisclosed amount to Primary Wave, a music publisher that also holds interests in the estates of Whitney Houston and other musicians. Nelson wrote in an affidavit that she did that to “realize some value from the Estate before the completion of the Estate administration.” Nelson also appointed Primary Wave to act on her behalf with respect to her remaining share of the estate.A brother, Alfred Jackson, also entered an agreement with Primary Wave before he died in August. Now, a separate case sorting out Jackson's estate is pending in Missouri, according to court documents.One court filing says Primary Wave has invested millions to acquire an interest in the estate. Law firms have also issued attorneys' liens against the interest of some siblings.Attorneys involved either declined comment or did not return messages. Attempts to reach some of the siblings were unsuccessful.While no one is contesting Tyka Nelson's agreement with Primary Wave, three siblings say the company should not be recognized as an “interested person” with similar rights as the heirs in the estate as the case proceeds. Sharon, Norrine and John Nelson said in a court filing that they are stretched financially and that the case has "cost the Estate millions of dollars, wasting far too much money on legal fees and other costs for far too long.”Susan Link, a Minneapolis estate attorney not involved in the case, said the sibling disagreements have stalled resolution.“If the beneficiaries are agreeing and working together in lock-step, it doesn’t matter how much the estate is worth, you can get things done,” Link said.___Associated Press writer Steve Karnowski contributed to this story.Amy Forliti, The Associated Press

  • 'Real life on fake Mars': Edmonton doctor on out-of-this-world mission in Utah
    News
    CBC

    'Real life on fake Mars': Edmonton doctor on out-of-this-world mission in Utah

    Shawna Pandya doesn't need a rocket flight to experience life on Mars.Pandya is among a growing contingent of researchers working on new technology that would allow humans to colonize the martian world.The Edmonton-based physician is serving as an astronaut on the red planet from the heart of the desert lands of the western United States. Pandya is acting as the commander of a 16 day mission at the Mars Desert Research Station near Hanksville, Utah.The mission officially began on Jan. 18. She will "return to Earth" on Feb. 3. "We're going to be living real life on fake mars," Pandya said in an interview Friday with CBC Radio's Edmonton AM."We're essentially living in a tin can."'Going outside would essentially kill you' The research station simulates life on Mars so researchers can study the science needed for human exploration of the planet."We're locked in, not locked in," she said. "You have to suit up to go outside because going outside would essentially kill you so that's the biggest adjustment." Pandya and her crew will be contending with all the complications of life in a hostile environment. The atmosphere on Mars is barren and deadly. Radiation is high. Oxygen is virtually nonexistent.Her water supply will be limited. Her meals will be freeze-dried or grown in an enclosed greenhouse on site. Communication with Earth will be limited. "In the past we've grown tomatoes and basil and thyme so there is a little bit of an opportunity for fresh food on Mars," she said. "And then you also maintain the time delays with Earth so, at its maximum that's a one way 20 minute communication delay, so you can imagine that nothing like phone calls or Skype or instant messaging is possible." This is Pandya's second mission at the research station and part of a growing resume in space research and bioastronautics. Pandya, who grew up in Sherwood Park, and earned two degrees at the University of Alberta, is an advanced diver, skydiver, pilot-in-training, and Fellow of the Explorers' Club.In 2015 she successfully completed Scientist-Astronaut Candidate training with Project PoSSUM (Polar Suborbital Science in the Upper Mesosphere) and was part of the first crew to test a commercial spacesuit in zero-gravity;She most recently completed an underwater mission with Nautical Experiments in Physiology, Technology & Underwater Exploration (NEPTUNE) for scientific research.She was selected as part of a five-member team of scientists that took part in the NEPTUNE research mission at the Jules Undersea Lodge in Key Largo, Fla. The mission in October kept the scientists underwater for five days to study the effects on the human body.Pandya's ongoing mission in Utah is a collaboration with Mars Academy USA. Her crew will be conducting studies on psychology and nutrition and doing medical simulations to test new protocols and other technologies. Pandya has dreams of becoming a physician in space and this mission will be the perfect test of her skills, she said. "We need to practice for hard environments like space because you don't want the first time you go to a different planet to be the first time you practice something," she said. "What's really exciting is these technologies also have a potential benefit for extreme and remote environments here on Earth. "We have a lot to achieve on this mission but we're really excited."

  • 'Baby Snow' born during Newfoundland's record snowfall
    CBC

    'Baby Snow' born during Newfoundland's record snowfall

    Kyle Snow's son Levi was born at the height of the St. John's blizzard on Friday. He knew getting Levi home would be a challenge, so he asked for help on social media with digging out the 2.5-metre snow drifts. He was overwhelmed with the response.

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    CBC

    Former health minister Jim Smith remembered as kind, caring person

    Dr. Jim Smith, a physician-turned-politician who held key cabinet portfolios including minister health under the Nova Scotia Liberal governments of the 1990s, has died at the age of 84.Smith carried the compassion and dedication he honed as a family physician into politics, according to former Premier Russell MacLellan."He cared and he worked until he found a way of getting things done," MacLellan said in a telephone interview from his home in Ingonish, N.S. "And he didn't make a lot of fuss about it."Smith died this weekend, according to friends."He was a marvellous individual," MacLellan said. "A gentleman to the core."Two decades in politicsOne of only six Liberals to win in the 1984 election, John Buchanan's largest of four PC majorities, Smith's introduction to Nova Scotia politics was as an opposition member.He sat on the opposition side of the House for the first of his almost two decades at the legislature as the representative of Dartmouth East.When the Liberals took power under John Savage's leadership, Smith was assigned his first major cabinet portfolio, minister of community services. He later took over the job of minister of housing and municipal affairs.But it was during the MacLellan years that Smith got his most challenging jobs, heading the Health Department and briefly carrying on the duties of justice minister.When the Liberals lost government in 1999, Smith was named caucus chair, a position he held until he left politics in 2003.'Everyone that he met loved him'In 2000, Smith joined the medical research firm MedMira, a Halifax-based company best known for its HIV test kits. Company CEO Hermes Chan said he and Smith traveled throughout the world marketing the kit and other MedMira products."Everyone that he met loved him," Chan said of his one-time vice-president of communications.That affection was shared by company employees, according to Chan. "Internally, our staff called him uncle Jim," Chan said. "He was a very likable guy but he's also [a man of] principal."If he believed, he believed till the end."Smith retired from the company and stepped down from MedMira's board of directors in 2011.MORE TOP STORIES

  • Day 3 of search underway for N.L. man who went missing in storm
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    CBC

    Day 3 of search underway for N.L. man who went missing in storm

    A scaled-back ground search is resuming for Joshua Wall, who has not been heard from since walking into a raging Newfoundland blizzard that brought record amounts of snow on Friday afternoon.For a third day, police officers and volunteer search and rescue specialists with the Avalon North Wolverines will be scouring the terrain near the Conception Bay community of Roaches Line."They are here. They are mobilizing now," Wayne Wall, Joshua's father, said Monday morning.Unlike Saturday and Sunday, however, there are no plans to deploy a helicopter, said RCMP civilian spokesperson Glenda Power.Searchers are assessing whether there's a need to recall air support to the area, she added.Power said the strategy Monday is to widen the search beyond the known trails in the wilderness area between Roaches Line and the community of Marysvale.Joshua has now been missing for three full days, and his family remains hopeful that he found some type of shelter and will be rescued."My son is out there somewhere. He's most likely cold. Hopefully he's hung up into a shelter," Wayne told CBC's Kayla Hounsell on Sunday.The search was delayed Monday morning by another overnight snowfall, with 10-plus centimetres, followed by drizzle, complicating search efforts.Joshua Wall has been dealing with anxiety, and was not feeling well Friday morning, said his father. By early afternoon, Wayne Wall said, his son was feeling better, and decided to walk to a friend's house in Marysvale, a distance of 10 kilometres by road.It was later learned that Joshua decided to enter the woods and travel along a backcountry trail. His last known communication was on Friday at 1 p.m., when he messaged his location to his friend, and writing that he was lost and his phone battery was low.An official search could not be mobilized until Saturday because of record amounts of snow and heavy drifting that prevented police and volunteers from reaching the scene.When asked how long police will continue the search, Power said an assessment will be made at the end of the day."At this point, there is no talk of ending the search," she said. "But it is now Day 4 since he's been missing, and we'll carefully make that decision."At its peak, there were 40 people searching for Joshua, said Power.Meanwhile, Power urged area residents to check their properties, and any buildings in which Joshua might have sought shelter from the storm.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

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    CBC

    Loss of youth centre the latest blow to Hillsborough

    After losing its bank and grocery store, the village of Hillsborough is about to suffer another loss. The Hillsborough Drop In centre, which offers free services for kids aged 10 to 17, will close at the end of February because of a lack of funding. The centre offers youth in the area a safe place to hang out and relax on week days after school from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Lynda Carey, the executive director of the Boys and Girls Club of Riverview, which runs the program, said she's concerned about what the loss will mean for the community of 1,200 people and what the kids will do for fun once the program closes."Before we came, the village did indicate that there was a significant number of RCMP calls for mid-afternoon, late afternoon vandalism and mischief," Carey said, adding that those calls weren't happening a year later. "I'm afraid that if we're not there, this sort of might reappear."The two-storey centre in Hillsborough, about 24 kilometres south of Riverview, began offering a variety of programs six years ago. They include physical recreation, planned trips, foosball, video games, cooking, arts and crafts, homework space and computer access for children and teens.Children and teens from Hillsborough, Hopewell Cape and Riverside-Albert use the program. About 75 kids are enrolled in the program this year, as of the beginning of January. "For some events, we've had up to 50 kids in that building because it's something that they're really looking forward to doing," Carey said.On quieter days, six or seven kids still go to the building to work on homework. Funding cut The Riverview Boys and Girls Club gets 90 per cent of its funding from local grants, but about $30,000 was cut in December. Carey said $30,000 is half what's needed to run the Hillsborough centre."When you lose that kind of money … it's hard to think how are you going to find that in such a short period of time, but we're hopeful." The Riverview Boys and Girls Club has an operating budget of $865,000. That money is divided among 12 programs run by the club, including the Hillsborough centre. Carey said it seems like there are more non-profit organizations in the greater Moncton area and only so much money to go around, so she understands why a donor may have wanted to support another non-profit this year. A town hall meeting will take place Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at the centre, at 61 Academy St. in Hillsborough, to talk about its future.

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    CBC

    Man arrested after armed robbery at Charlottetown bakery

    A 36-year-old Charlottetown man has been charged with armed robbery and is in custody.Police responded to several calls reporting an armed robbery at Nick's Bakery, Deli and Convenience Friday, said Deputy Chief Brad MacConnell. MacConnell said a man wearing a ski mask entered the store with a shotgun and demanded money.He said two people were inside when the suspect entered the store. The male clerk handed over cash to the suspect. No one was injured. "I can only imagine the shock and trauma caused by the incident," he said. "Certainly it would be easy to understand why they'd be traumatized by it." MacConnell said the man is next scheduled to appear in provincial court Tuesday.The man has been charged with armed robbery with a firearm, possession of a prohibited weapon and using a disguise when committing an offence, MacConnell said.He said "a small amount" of money was taken and has not yet been recovered.More charges are being considered. More P.E.I. news