Baby Yoda is a bonus passenger of the SpaceX Commercial Crew mission

Randi Mann
·2 min read
Baby Yoda is a bonus passenger of the SpaceX Commercial Crew mission
Baby Yoda is a bonus passenger of the SpaceX Commercial Crew mission
Baby Yoda is a bonus passenger of the SpaceX Commercial Crew mission
Baby Yoda is a bonus passenger of the SpaceX Commercial Crew mission

If the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) isn't already cool enough, the team that just launched the first SpaceX Commercial Crew mission, also including a little plush The Child (aka Baby Yoda).

On Sunday, November 15, 2020, SpaceX's Crew-1 mission launched its first operational flight of their new Crew Dragon spacecraft.

Perhaps toy Baby Yoda didn't have to go through all the rigorous testing of his human co-passengers as he fit the "zero-g indicator" bill perfectly.

With all of NASA's cutting-edge technology, the agency uses a soft and small object to simply and effectively confirm when the rocket passes the threshold of Earth's gravity.

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Obviously, Baby Yoda can't fly Solo, after all, he is just a Child. The Crew-1 Dragon's human passengers are:

  • Commander Michael Hopkins, NASA

  • Pilot Victor Glover, NASA

  • Mission Specialist Shannon Walker, NASA

  • Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

The mission is headed to the International Space Station (ISS) where the crew will be stationed for six months.

Baby Yoda first won hearts with his big eyes and irresistible squeaks in the Disney+ series “The Mandalorian”. The streaming series is the first live-action television show in the "Star Wars" franchise.

Past zero-g indicators toys have been a hot ticket item in the past, like Tremor the dinosaur who joined a previous mission. Compounded with Baby Yoda's existing commercial success, the potential for these plush cuties is to infinity and beyond! That could be a different franchise.

Thumbnail credit: NASA