From the basement to the confessional: A peek inside 100-year-old St. Dunstan's Basilica

You can't miss St. Dunstan's Basilica in Charlottetown. The enormous structure takes up almost an entire block, just down from Parliament House and within shouting distance of the bars on Victoria Row and Sydney Street.

Look up. Its spires are one of the highest points in the city skyline. It's one of the city's most recognizable landmarks.

The current building is the fourth cathedral built on the site, completed in 1919 after the previous building was destroyed by fire.

In 1929, the pope granted St. Dunstan's the title of basilica, one of only 20 in Canada to bear the honorary title.

In 1990, the federal government designated St. Dunstan's a national historic site, calling it "one of the most elaborate churches in the Maritimes and a fine example of high Victorian Gothic revival architecture."

In the summer, you can often see tourists posing on the front steps. Its doors are open to the public, but for those who have never stepped inside, here is peek into the building where Island Catholics have been worshipping for 100 years.

Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC
Shane Ross/CBC

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