Bay Roberts family receives car donation to help get to chemotherapy treatments safely

·2 min read
Edward Fowlow, right, and daughter Lexi needed a new vehicle to get back and forth to St. John's for Lexi's chemotherapy treatments.  (Cortney Barber/Facebook - image credit)
Edward Fowlow, right, and daughter Lexi needed a new vehicle to get back and forth to St. John's for Lexi's chemotherapy treatments. (Cortney Barber/Facebook - image credit)
Cortney Barber/Facebook
Cortney Barber/Facebook

Edward Fowlow of Bay Roberts drives to and from St. John's to take his two-year-old daughter to chemotherapy treatments.

Fowlow, a single father of three, recently ran into some car problems which were magnified by the weekly trips to the Janeway Children's Hospital.

On Friday a group of well wishers donated a car, a gas card and some cash to Fowlow to ensure a safe and reliable ride for his family each time they have to make the roughly 90-kilometre trip to St. John's.

"The car I had, when it broke down, so many things were going through my mind when it happened," Fowlow told CBC News.

"This gentleman donated a car. It's mind-blowing. It's amazing. I didn't expect it at all."

Fowlow's daughter, Lexi, was diagnosed with neuroblastoma six months ago. Fowlow became her sole guardian and looks after her medical needs, all while taking time off work as a carpenter.

On Wednesday Cortney Barber posted in the Neighbours In Need Facebook group outlining Fowlow's situation.

Fowlow said he only expected a few dollars to come in to help his family, but two days later he had the keys to a 2014 Dodge Journey.

Paying it forward

Evan Bursey, who owns a transportation business in Conception Bay South, read about Fowlow's situation in the Facebook group.

Bursey said he spoke with his father and some mutual friends and they decided they would donate a vehicle.

Emma Grunwald/CBC
Emma Grunwald/CBC

"Obviously they were a family in need. To be truthful, I grew up with very little myself. We were not a wealthy family," Bursey said.

"When I seen this story in particular it was a little different than mine, but at the same time I was happy to be in the position that I could help them and I guess pay it forward."

Bursey said his gesture felt enlightening, heartwarming and has been getting messages from Fowlow's friends and family for his good deed.

"It does make you feel good, but the important part is Lexi gets her treatments [and] she gets there safely and back," Bursey said.

"They had a close call on the side of the road the last time they used their vehicle. That wont happen again, not in the near future."

Read more articles from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting