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Bill Gates thinks the super-wealthy should pay more tax – and plenty of rich people agree

Bill Gates
Bill Gates at the World Economic Forum in Davos.Fabrice Coffrini/Getty Images
  • Bill Gates has often talked about imposing a tax on the wealthy.

  • He told the World Economic Forum that "those who have the most" should be more generous.

  • More than 250 wealthy individuals signed an open letter urging global leaders to tax the rich more.

Bill Gates wants ultra-wealthy individuals to pay more tax — and now a growing chorus of billionaires agree.

In his annual "Ask Me Anything" forum on Reddit last year, the Microsoft cofounder said he was "surprised" that taxes for the rich haven't been increased more.

Gates doubled down on his calls to tax the rich in a panel at the World Economic Forum in Davos this week. He said the wealthiest nations should donate more money to developing countries to help redress inequality.

"Those who have the most — whether it's countries, companies, or individuals — should be pushed to be more generous," he said.

It seems others agree, as more than 250 ultra-wealthy people signed an open letter calling for global leaders to impose a wealth tax.

"Our request is simple: we ask you to tax us, the very richest in society," the letter says. It also says that taxing the super-wealthy won't "deprive" their children or "fundamentally alter" their standard of living.

The open letter's signatories includes Abigail Disney, whose grandfather Roy O. Disney cofounded The Walt Disney Company. It also includes "Succession" actor Brian Cox and Valerie Rockefeller of the Rockefeller family.

"If elected representatives of the world's leading economies do not take steps to address the dramatic rise of economic inequality, the consequences will continue to be catastrophic for society," the letter reads.

A report was released alongside the letter as part of the "Proud To Pay More" campaign, put together by the Patriotic Millionaires, Patriotic Millionaires UK, TaxMeNow, Millionaires For Humanity, and charity Oxfam.

The report includes a note written by Abigail Disney, in which she writes that she "was wrong" for flying alone on her family's private Boeing 737 on trips from California to New York.

The Disney heiress said: "I have since given up flying private and have made other adjustments to my routines in an effort to protect the environment."

She also partly blamed the richest 1% for contributing to climate change as a result of their "private jets, superyachts, gas-guzzling hot rods, helicopters, and (for a lucky few) private space rockets."

Read the original article on Business Insider