'Black Panther Challenge' creator ramps up pressure on Redskins with 'Caucasians' T-shirts

Frederick Joseph is looking ramp up the pressure on Redskins owner Daniel Snyder with a campaign featuring “Caucasians” T-shirts. (Twitter/ @FredTJoseph)

Frederick Joseph launched the wildly popular #BlackPantherChallenge campaign that raised almost $1 million to send underprivileged children to see the Marvel superhero movie.

The goal was to send kids who may not otherwise have the means to see the movie with positive portrayals of African heroes.

Frederick Joseph puts pressure on Redskins

Now Joseph is taking on one of the most heated debates in sports — the name and logo of the Washington Redskins.

Joseph wore a T-shirt around the streets of New York with a mockup of the controversial logo that replaced the team’s name with “Caucasians” and featured the profile of a white man in place of the NFL team’s Native American mascot.

To the surprise of nobody, this was not well-received. He documented his experience in a Twitter thread he posted Tuesday.









After retelling his experience, Joseph invited others to join him in his campaign.


He pointed people to where they, too can purchase a “Caucasians” shirt.


Before imploring people joining the campaign to be safe.


Joseph following in Bomani Jones’ footsteps

Joseph isn’t the first public figure to tread this ground.

In 2016, outspoken ESPN host Bomani Jones wore a “Caucasians” T-shirt on air that mocked the logo of the Cleveland Indians and their mascot Chief Wahoo.

“The reason they won’t get rid of Chief Wahoo, which is completely indefensible, is ’cause they can still sell stuff with it,” Jones said while speaking about his shirt. “They can say they are going to de-emphasize it, but they’re not going to set money on fire.”

Earlier this year, the Indians announced that they were phasing out Chief Wahoo because the mascot “is no longer appropriate.”

Redskins owner Daniel Snyder has been adamant about maintaining the name and logo of his NFL team despite mounting pressure to change them. (AP)

Dan Snyder a roadblock to progress on Redskins’ name

Joseph is ramping up the pressure in Washington to do the same with their NFL team’s name and logo.

This appears to be a tougher fight with team owner Daniel Snyder remaining steadfast that he will not change the name of the Washington Redskins despite mounting pressure and progressing cultural norms shunning the racism associated with the team.

“The Washington Redskins team, our fans and community have always believed our name represents honor, respect and pride,” Snyder said in a 2016 statement defending the team’s name. 

Snyder, 53, grew up in Maryland watching the team through their heyday, and is now living out a childhood fantasy as the team’s owner. The prospects of the team’s name changing while he’s still in charge seem slim.

It seems that only overwhelming public pressure that threatens the team’s bottom line could convince Snyder to shift his thinking on the matter.

With his “Caucasians” campaign, that is exactly what Joseph is trying to achieve.

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Jason Owens is a writer for Yahoo Sports. Follow him on Twitter.

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