• General view of the PC gaming area at Enthusiast Gaming Live (Farah Syed)General view of the PC gaming area at Enthusiast Gaming Live (Farah Syed)

    Looking down from the second floor of the International Centre in Mississauga, the noise is overwhelming. People are cheering, laughing, and it’s drowning out the subtler sounds of games beeping and keyboards clattering. Suddenly, it crescendos and the power goes out. As the organizers of Enthusiast Gaming Live (EGL) whip out their phones and begin calling around to find the source of the problem, the crowd gathered below is illuminated by the televisions being run by back-up generators and they begin chanting “MVG! MVG! MVG!”

    The same thing happened this past April in Arizona at MVG Sandstorm and since the esports world is so closely knit, the people here at EGL know all about it. There’s more laughter and chanting, but everyone stays put. After all, they’re here to support the first esports tournament of this scale in Canada, and they plan to be here to the end.

    Meet the new face of gaming. Historically, gaming has been seen as the domain of teenage boys, playing at home in their

    Read More »from Esports mean big bucks: inside the rich, new world of video games
  • FIFA President Sepp Blatter speaks during a press conference at the FIFA headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland, Tuesday, June 2, 2015. Blatter says he will resign from his position amid corruption scandal. (Ennio Leanza/Keystone via AP)FIFA President Sepp Blatter speaks during a press conference at the FIFA headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland, Tuesday, June 2, 2015. Blatter says he will resign from his position amid corruption scandal. (Ennio Leanza/Keystone via AP)
    The arrest and charges against officials from world soccer’s governing body  FIFA did not come as a surprise to the Canadian lawyer and anti-corruption expert who once tried to help clean up the organization.

    Alexandra Wrage, president and founder of the U.S.-based anti-bribery organization TRACE International, quit FIFA’s independent governance committee two years ago in frustration.

    “It was clear that FIFA was not serious about reform at the time of the IGC,” she tells Yahoo Canada News.

    The group whose aim was to improve accountability and transparency at the non-profit organization following a previous suite of scandals was relegated to occasional meetings and conference calls.

    “If you’re working with an organization that’s really receptive to change, you can do it that way, but for an organization that was so reluctant and foot-dragging about the process, occasional meetings was just not going to do the trick,” she says.

    “So I could stay and be ineffective and have the group’s

    Read More »from Corruption-fighting Canadian lawyer’s advice for FIFA
  • P.E.I. Premier Robert Ghiz (L) shakes hands with Metis National Council president Clement Chartier.P.E.I. Premier Robert Ghiz (L) shakes hands with Metis National Council president Clement Chartier.

    The Métis National Council says the government of Canada and Truth and Reconciliation Commission process has treated Canada’s Métis people as an afterthought, leaving them out of an opportunity for healing from the intergenerational effects of Canada’s residential school system.

    “For an Aboriginal people who have experienced decades of marginalization, many of whom attended Métis residential or boarding schools, this latest exclusion is inexcusable and demoralizing,” said Métis Nation president Clément Chartier in a press release.

    Although many children attended residential and boarding schools, Métis were not part of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement, a multi-billion dollar agreement between the federal government, churches and survivors that resulted in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

    This was likely because the schools most Métis children attended, while run by churches, were provincially funded and not funded by Ottawa. The federal government has been, to put it

    Read More »from Métis denounce exclusion from Truth and Reconciliation Commission process
  • Pigeon flies into man's Norway apartment, leaves egg in frying pan

    Norwegian Stian Fjelldal got a feathery surprise in his apartment in Oslo

    Fired egg: The surprise in Stian's frying pan. (CEN)Fired egg: The surprise in Stian's frying pan. (CEN)

    Norwegian Stian Fjelldal got a feathery surprise when two pigeons flew into his flat - and left an egg in his frying pan.

    The pigeons left droppings all over Stian's kitchen in Oslo before leaving a single egg surrounded by twigs on his stove (which was turned off).

    Unsure how to deal with the situation, Stian ushered the pigeons out of his kitchen window.

    The egg still remains in his frying pan while he figures out what to do next.

    Egg-stra special: The pigeons abandoned their flat gift. (CEN)Egg-stra special: The pigeons abandoned their flat gift. (CEN)

     

    Stian is still unsure what to do with the mystery egg. (CEN)Stian is still unsure what to do with the mystery egg. (CEN)

    Stian said: 'It was of course terrified when it saw me and started flapping around in the kitchen.

    'It was chaos and a lot of feathers. My first thought was to get it out.

    'I had to clean, the kitchen was a total mess. I noticed two of the birds on the windowsil looking at the egg. I almost felt a little guilty.'

    Stian posted a video of the incident on Facebook, and asked what he should do with the egg.

    On his way out: The pigeon makes his exit. (CEN)On his way out: The pigeon makes his exit. (CEN)

    One reply said: 'Lock the window, clean the kitchen, fry the egg and enjoy yourself,' suggested one user.

    Another said: 'Don’t think of mother dove, there are

    Read More »from Pigeon flies into man's Norway apartment, leaves egg in frying pan
  • The conventional wisdom regarding memory-loss diseases such as amnesia and Alzheimer’s has long been that all affected memories are erased or destroyed.

    But a new study from MIT is suggesting a possible alternative: that while the ability to access memories may vanish, the memories themselves may still be fully intact and encoded within the brain.

    “If you ask a neuroscientist what we know about memory, most people will say we have these pathways, or traces, that are formed in the brain, and these are somehow required for us to recall information accurately,” MIT researcher and study co-author Dheeray Roy told Yahoo Canada.

    “In cases of amnesia, a lot of people would believe these traces actually are non-existent, and that’s the underlying cause of the disease. Our study came in, I think, to ask whether amnesia truly is a storage-type issue, or whether some memories do persist and there is just no way to access them – and can we do something about it?”

    A technology called optogenetics

    Read More »from Scientists shine a new light on memory loss
  • Assembly of First Nations Chief Phil Fontaine, right, watches as Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper thanks Beverley Jacobs, head of the Native Women's Association of Canada, after she responded to the government's apology for more than a century of abuse and cultural loss involving Indian residential schools at a ceremony in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Wednesday, June 11, 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tom HansonAssembly of First Nations Chief Phil Fontaine, right, watches as Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper thanks Beverley Jacobs, head of the Native Women's Association of Canada, after she responded to the government's apology for more than a century of abuse and cultural loss involving Indian residential schools at a ceremony in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Wednesday, June 11, 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tom Hanson

    By voting against an NDP private member’s bill that sought to harmonize Canadian laws with the United Nations declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples, the government has gone against its own endorsement of the UN document, according to indigenous law and human rights experts.

    The Canadian government endorsed the UN declaration in 2010 after what critics say was deliberate attempt to derail or weaken it.

    “[But] this Canadian strategy has continued to be implemented for the past 9 years,” said Paul Joffe, a lawyer and international human rights expert, at a panel discussion during the final days of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Ottawa on Monday.

    The endorsement, Joffe said, did not change the way the Canadian government dealt with or treated indigenous issues.

    Joffe referenced a recent bill tabled in the House of Commons by NDP MP and residential school survivor Romeo Saganash that would have forced the federal government to align its laws with the UN declaration.

    Read More »from Harper government went against own endorsement of UN indigenous rights declaration
  • Protesters at a rally against Bill C-51 were treated to an unexpected conversation about the legislation with an RCMP officer on watch over the weekend.

    Video of the exchange surfaced on YouTube some time after the Saturday afternoon protest on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. In it, the officer and a couple of protesters are seen discussing Bill C-51, the government’s controversial anti-terror legislation.

    “People are really scared that they’re going to be taking the law to the worst possible limit. Is that going to happen? I’m not sure,” the officer, so far unnamed, says in the video.

    "Whenever you’re attacking the Canadian economy you could be branded a terrorist, right?” the officer says a little bit later. “Which is not necessarily what’s going to happen, but it could happen.”

    It’s unknown whether "they" was in referrence to the Conservative government, the Department of Justice or law enforcement brass. And it's also unclear whether the officer was relaying his personal opinion about

    Read More »from ‘You could be branded terrorists’: RCMP officer to demonstrators
  • Prince Edward Island is the only jurisdiction in Canada where abortion services are not available.

    The province announced with some fanfare Tuesday that arrangements have been made for the Moncton hospital, in neighbouring New Brunswick, to provide abortion services to island women beginning in July, but the fact remains that abortions are not available within PEI’s boundaries.

    The province’s medical health plan covers only procedures performed at the hospital, not at a private clinic.

    The private Morgentaler Clinic in PEI closed last July because of the lack of funding from the province. The government then rejected an offer to have physicians from outside the province travel to PEI on a regular basis to offer the service. Before it closed its doors, the clinic said between 70 and 80 women paid for their own abortions annually at the facility.

    Women in PEI will no longer need a doctor’s referral to terminate a pregnancy.

    The province had been sending women to the hospital in Halifax

    Read More »from Abortion in Canada - it’s legal, but is it accessible?
  • Guess what guys? It's time to go home! (Thinkstock)Guess what guys? It's time to go home! (Thinkstock)

    Are you still in your chair at work, typing away on your keyboard? (Or, if you’re reading this, surreptitiously checking Yahoo on your phone while taking a quick break? Don’t worry, we won’t tell.) And do you find yourself pining for the hours to fly by faster, so you can start the rush-hour trek home?

    This is the one day a year (at least unofficially) you don’t need to wait until 5 PM for take your leave.

    Today is National Leave The Office Early Day, an American "holiday" that has gained some interest abroad, too (and let’s be honest, we celebrated Cinco de Mayo last month, what’s to stop us from adopting another foreign holiday?). You’re not likely to see this printed on any calendar, and it might require some convincing to get your boss to go along with it, but there’s actually good reason why he or she should be game to let you make an early departure every once in a while.

    The day was created by Employee Productivity Specialist Laura Stack, an American public speaker who

    Read More »from Celebrating National Leave the Office Early Day the right way
  • A Canadian one dollar billA Canadian one dollar bill
    An Edmonton hospital may be able to lay claim to a truly dubious title: the worst time capsule opening ever.

    The Misericordia Community Hospital on Monday opened a time capsule that had been buried for just 25 years, and had nothing of any real interest buried inside.

    In fact, the time capsule was so inconsequential that for years, the hospital forgot all about it.  According to the Edmonton Journal, the only reason anybody found it all was because in 2013, when the hospital buried a different time capsule, someone remembered they’d already done this before. Except nobody remembered where it had been hidden.

    A granite bird bath supposedly marked the spot, but the bird bath had been moved several times because of construction, with no records to determine where the time capsule might be.

    A report in the

    Read More »from Edmonton hospital's time capsule opening may be the worst ever

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