• After shark attacks plagued the Outer Banks of North Carolina in the last few weeks, the Bergmans thought of an interesting way to quell the possibility of further attacks.

    Using PVC pipes, Scott and Sandi Bergman made protective cages that they then painted silver to look like steel.

    Beachgoer M.K. Rainville remembers watching the two casually walk into the ocean with their homemade shark-protectors.

    “We first knew something was up when the wife was taking photos of her husband with the cage and then proceeded to take a video,” Rainville told WTVR.

    A video of the event has since been uploaded to YouTube, and currently has just over 950,000 views.

    In it, the two are shown taking on the wavy waters, while hoisting the ‘steel’ cages above their knees.

    The couple are then seen getting a few feet away from shore, but are they quickly called back to shore by a confused-looking lifeguard.

    It has since been revealed that the entire operation was a prank.

    Following the recent series of shark

    Read More »from Couple tries out homemade shark cages
  • Need some classy wine tips to show-up your fancy schmancy friends?  Understanding and enjoying wine isn’t as complicated as it seems. The List’s Ariel Wesler takes us through wine facts, that even your friends who just can’t stop talking aboutNeed some classy wine tips to show-up your fancy schmancy friends? Understanding and enjoying wine isn’t as complicated as it seems. The List’s Ariel Wesler takes us through wine facts, that even your friends who just can’t stop talking about

    A Canadian legal charity that works on cases pro-bono is crowdfunding Canadians for the cause of free beer.

    The Indiegogo campaign launched by the Canadian Constitution Foundation (CCF) is aiming to raise $20,000 for the legal defence for a New Brunswick man who was charged with illegally importing liquor into his home province from Quebec in 2012. Gerard Comeau, a retired steelworker, was fined $292.50 after buying 17 cases of his favourite beer from a Quebec liquor store.

    New Brunswick’s liquor law prohibits importing more than one bottle of wine or 12 pints of beer from another province.

    The CCF intends to challenge the outdated law, saying it goes against section 121 of the Constitution Act of 1867, which protects the free flow of goods from one province into another.

    “We’re not planning to give away free beer,” Karen Selick, CCF’s litigation director tells Yahoo Canada News. “We’re trying to free up the inter-provincial transportation of beer.”

    Mark Hicken is a lawyer with the

    Read More »from Ban on importing alcohol inter-provincially being challenged
  • Adults can head back to camp and play games like tug-of-war, just like they did as kids. (Thinkstock)Adults can head back to camp and play games like tug-of-war, just like they did as kids. (Thinkstock)

    An increasing number of Canadian grown-ups are seeking fun and frivolity at adult-only summer camps, where tapping into your inner child takes place without fear of reprimand, time outs or the dreaded stink eye.

    That’s a big part of the appeal for those 18 and over who are signing up and paying, in some cases, several hundred dollars for weekend and week-long camp vacations. Essentially, these organized camps give adults a free pass to goof off unabashedly.

    “It’s a way to shed your professional self and be a kid again,” says Danielle Goldfinger, founder of Two Islands Weekend, a camp that mixes alcohol and food with canoeing, beach volleyball and yoga. “When kids go to camp they meet the best pals of their lives and this is a way to facilitate that kind of bonding.”

    Nostalgia for creating tie-dyed t-shirts and joining in sing-alongs around a bonfire prompted Goldfinger, a seasoned camper as a child, to establish her grown-up version in Haliburton two summers ago. To assess interest,

    Read More »from Psychologists see value in adults making the return to summer camp
  • California’s dreadful multi-year drought has left one of the world’s most hugely productive agricultural zones in dry and draining desperation.

    But a bold new water recycling scheme – greener, cleaner and far more efficient – is offering some urgently needed hope.

    In the state’s vast Central Valley, a company called WaterFX is developing a practical, potentially game-changing way to reclaim and clean agricultural waste water.

    “It’s typically thought that, because of the high energy consumption associated with distilling water – which is essentially boiling it – it’s not a good use of our energy resources,” WaterFX co-founder Dr. Matthew Stuber told Yahoo Canada.

    “However, once we couple it with renewable energy, it becomes a different proposition.”

    WaterFX's upcoming HydroRevolution project in California uses solar energy to turn waste water into steam, which cooks out all the impurities. As clean, fresh water condenses, that energy is released, recaptured and pumped right back into

    Read More »from Sun could hold key to solving California's water problems
  • Why the secrecy? That’s what a lot of Torontonians are asking about the police response to a double shooting at a city McDonald’s last February. The public has been told very little about the incident, except that a private security guard who was working near the fast food restaurant stopped in to grab a bite when he became engaged in a significant confrontation with two young men whom he subsequently shot and killed.

    The public doesn’t know exactly why the guard shot the men, what triggered the altercation or how it escalated, though there’s speculation that the guard felt his life was in danger. The public also doesn’t know the guard’s name, nor where he was working before he stopped into McDonald’s; only the name of the company that employs him has been released. Finally, surveillance video of the event has not been viewed outside of police offices.

    There is a huge difference between the public interest and what the public is interested in.
    Mark Pugash, Toronto Police

    In a

    Read More »from Why won't police share information after a public incident?
  • A water bomber returns to Okanagan Lake during efforts to fight the wildfire in Kelowna, B.C. (Reuters)A water bomber returns to Okanagan Lake during efforts to fight the wildfire in Kelowna, B.C. (Reuters)

    If you like your wine to have a smoky flavour, having the grapes ripen in the midst of a raging wildfire is not how you get it.

    The Okanagan region of southern British Columbia once again is threatened by fires racing through the tinder-dry forests near the postcard-pretty lake shore. Some of the area’s flourishing wineries are getting ready to again protect their vineyards and buildings.

    It’s just one of the sectors of B.C.’s agriculture industry that has to worry about wildfires, whose damaging effects aren’t limited to blackened strands of timber. Cattle ranchers, pork and chicken operators and orchard-fruit growers can all find themselves scrambling if fire threatens to encroach on them.

    Memories of 2003’s Summer of Fire aren’t buried very deeply around Okanagan Lake. That year, the Okanagan Mountain Park fire ate into the grapevines at Oak Bay Vineyards and destroyed the first winery building at adjacent St. Hubertus Estate winery, as well as co-founder Leo Gebert’s home.

    “It was

    Read More »from Smoky grapes, scorched beef: ‘Agri-threats’ posed by B.C. wildfires
  • A Canadian legal charity that works on cases pro-bono is crowd-funding Canadians for the cause of free beer. At least, that’s what the Indiegogo campaign launched by the Canadian Constitution Foundation is called.

    It’s aiming to raise $20,000 for the legal defense for a New Brunswick man who was charged with illegally importing liquor into his home province from Quebec in 2012. Gerard Comeau, a retired steelworker, was fined $292.50 after buying 17 cases of beer from a Quebec liquor store.

    New Brunswick’s law prohibits importing more than one bottle of wine or 12 pints of beer from another province, according to the federal Importation of Intoxicating Liquors Act, which passed in 1928.

    The CCF intend to challenge the constitution, saying it goes against section 121 of the Constitution Act of 1867, which protects the free flow of goods from one province into another.

    “We’re not planning to give away free beer,” Karen Selick, Litigation Director with the CCF tells Yahoo Canada News. “We’re

    Read More »from
  • Six Nations is holding the country's first-ever on-reserve Pride parade on Saturday.Six Nations is holding the country's first-ever on-reserve Pride parade on Saturday.

    Six Nations of the Grand River, the largest and most populous First Nations reserve in Canada, is hosting the first-ever on-reserve Pride parade this weekend.

    Located about 110 kilometres southwest of Toronto, Six Nations comprises 25,660 members, some 12,271 of whom live on reserve. It is famous for being the only reserve in North America to have all six Iroquois nations — Mohawk, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, Seneca and Tuscarora — living together.

    The plan for a Pride march was born after a conversation between band member Myka Burning and her young daughter about the oppression faced by people in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) community. Burning, who wasn’t immediately available to comment, was inspired to create the event after her daughter asked her if there were indigenous people who were also LGBTQ.

    “I said, ‘Of course!’” Burning told the Two Row Times. “And she said ‘Why don’t we have a Pride parade on the reserve to show Indians we care about them!’

    Read More »from Canada’s largest reserve Six Nations hosts first-ever Pride parade
  • Dog that 'barked too much' finally found a loving home after four years in a shelter

    “That was the day I met the real Mira: the Mira who thinks she’s still a puppy."

    MiraMira

    After nearly four years in a shelter, confined to a cage, this pup is finally breaking free.

    It all started at a Middletown Humane Society in New York State when a volunteer was asked to take out the dog in the corner cage that “barked so much.” Danyell Hopper remembers being very nervous.

    After all, Mira – the eight-year-old pup – had been there for more than three years and made so much noise that Hopper was certain “that’s why she hadn’t been adopted yet.”

    But after spending some one-on-one time with Mira, Hopper’s began to witness a loving side to Mira that had gone unnoticed.

    “I remember sitting there, so scared of the dog who probably weighed more than I did,” she wrote on her Facebook page. “But she laid [sic] down next to me and rolled on her back for a belly rub.”

    Mira went on to play until she was so pooped that she lied across Hopper as if she were a lapdog.

    “It surprised me when I looked at her in that moment, because I remember thinking, ‘this is why you haven’t been

    Read More »from Dog that 'barked too much' finally found a loving home after four years in a shelter
  • Want to avoid divorce? Here's when to get married

    by Kelly Putter

    You’re smart, right? You waited till your mid to late thirties to tie the knot after earning a post-secondary education, travelling some and getting a solid foothold in your career.

    Better hang on to that pre-nup.

    A new study flips conventional wisdom on its head by suggesting that those who marry older face a higher risk of divorce, according to a sociologist at the University of Utah whose data unearthed surprising results about marriage success and age.

    Nicholas H. Wolfinger found that people who marry after their early thirties are more likely to divorce than those who wed in their late twenties. While his data confirms the commonly held belief that getting hitched in your late teens and early twenties is a sure-fire ticket for failure, the finding that older brides and grooms are more likely to split is an eye opener.

    According to his numbers, once past the age of 32, the odds of divorce increase by five per cent per year of age at marriage. His analysis is from

    Read More »from Want to avoid divorce? Here's when to get married

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