• Inuit children read an Inuktitut language book at a day care in Iqaluit. The Auditor General of Canada is in Nunavut discussing his report on education, which says Nunavut won't meet its goal of a bilingual education in English and Inuktitut by 2020.Inuit children read an Inuktitut language book at a day care in Iqaluit. The Auditor General of Canada is in Nunavut discussing his report on education, which says Nunavut won't meet its goal of a bilingual education in English and Inuktitut by 2020.

    Employment and Social Development Minister Pierre Poilievre is pleading with everyone — with you, with his colleagues in the House of Commons — to help spread the word about the lack of families lining up to claim the government’s Universal Child Care Benefit.

    Anyone who has previously applied for the child care benefit will be automatically registered for the changes, but according to Poilievre, about 200,000 unregistered families will likely miss out on the expanded program.

    Previously, families would receive $100 a month for every child under 6 years of age. Under the expanded program, parents will receive $160 per month, for a total annual benefit of $1,920 per year for each child.

    A new benefit for parents with children between the ages of 6 and 17 has also been added, offering $60 per month

    Read More »from Canadian families missing out on millions in unclaimed child care benefits: Ottawa
  • NDP Leader Tom Mulcair and Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau attend a panel discussion at the âiVote - jeVoteâ event in Ottawa, Tuesday March 25, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian WyldNDP Leader Tom Mulcair and Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau attend a panel discussion at the âiVote - jeVoteâ event in Ottawa, Tuesday March 25, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

    There may be a dark horse in the race to the Oct. 19 federal election, as Justin Trudeau appears to stumble and the Conservative brand takes a hit in national and provincial polls. The NDP is showing modest gains, according latest polling averages, with potential votes creeping from Liberal support to NDP support in dire regions.

    Eric Grenier of the blog ThreeHundredEight.com crunched some numbers and found that Trudeau’s lead in national voting intentions has slipped below the Conservatives for the first time since Trudeau has led the Liberal party.

    And while this puts the Conservatives in first place, it’s the NDP that seems to be gaining — modestly — from the decline in Liberal support.

    Grenier’s polling averages have put the Conservatives just ahead with 32 per cent support and the Liberals with 31 per cent, whereas in previous polling averages the LPC would reach about 34 per cent. The NDP currently comes in at 22 per cent, as good as they’ve been polling in the past year.

    Read More »from Polls suggest support for NDP increasing at Liberal’s expense
  • Rick StrankmanRick Strankman

    Wildrose MLA Rick Strankman is apologizing for a poster announcing a pie auction fundraiser that was deemed much too old fashioned for many people’s palates.

    The auction, dubbed a “BYWP (Bring Your Wife’s Pie)” event, was set to raise funds for Strankman’s re-election campaign.

    The event’s advertisement, though — suggesting women do the baking and men do the politics — had critics up in arms, with accusations that the party is stuck in the past.

     

    Strankman, via

    Read More »from Wildrose MLA Rick Strankman apologizes for ‘old fashioned’ pie poster
  • Prime Minister Stephen Harper, centre, accompanied by Canadian Pan Am and Parapan Am athletes Elise Marcotte, second left, Marco Dispaltro, third from right, Priscilla Gagne, second from right, and Tera Van Beilen, right, waves as he departs for Panama to participate in the Summit of the Americas, in Ottawa on Friday, April 10, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian WyldPrime Minister Stephen Harper, centre, accompanied by Canadian Pan Am and Parapan Am athletes Elise Marcotte, second left, Marco Dispaltro, third from right, Priscilla Gagne, second from right, and Tera Van Beilen, right, waves as he departs for Panama to participate in the Summit of the Americas, in Ottawa on Friday, April 10, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
    Like the best races, whether horses or honourable members of Parliament, the contenders for this year’s federal election are on the move.

    The starting gun has yet to fire but positions are shifting, along with voter intentions, and one of the latest polls puts the three main parties in a tight race on a national scale.

    A surge in Conservative support after Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced strict new security measures last fall appears to have evaporated, says the poll from Ekos.

    ”The voter landscape is shifting in ways that do not appear to favour Stephen Harper’s Conservatives who now find themselves under 29 points for the first time since the security bounce from last October propelled them into a small but significant lead,” says the poll.

    “They now (insignificantly) trail Justin Trudeau’s Liberals and see less than a six-point margin over a clearly rejuvenated NDP.”

    Nationally, 30.1 per cent of those polled say they would vote Liberal, 28.7 per cent Conservative and 22.0

    Read More »from Tory support sliding but next fed election still anybody's game: poll
  • Rachel Notley says election about best interests of Tories, not AlbertaRachel Notley says election about best interests of Tories, not Alberta

    The provincial election in Alberta is likely to bode well for the NDP, under the new leadership of party leader Rachel Notley, and the party could realistically set its sights on official opposition status.

    The party’s prospects aren’t, technically, the best they’ve ever been. The NDP was the official opposition in Alberta in the mid-to-late eighties, says Duane Bratt, political science professor at Mount Royal University in Calgary, when they held the bulk of seats in Edmonton. This, he added, is what the party is looking at now.

    Bratt expects they’ll do very well in Edmonton, likely picking up a seat in Lethbridge and maybe in Calgary as well, but shouldn’t expect to knock out Jim Prentice and the reign of the Progressive Conservatives.

    “Given that they have a caucus of four, previously they had a caucus of two, going up to 10 or 12 or 14 seats would be dramatic for the NDP. They’re not about to form power,” Bratt says.

    “Notley can talk about [how] she’s running for premier, [but]

    Read More »from NDP’s Rachel Notley running for opposition leader, not premier, says expert
  • A view shows the Senate Chamber on Parliament Hill in Ottawa April 24, 2014. The Supreme Court of Canada will deliver its opinion Friday on how Canada's unelected Senate can be reformed or abolished. REUTERS/Chris Wattie (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS)A view shows the Senate Chamber on Parliament Hill in Ottawa April 24, 2014. The Supreme Court of Canada will deliver its opinion Friday on how Canada's unelected Senate can be reformed or abolished. REUTERS/Chris Wattie (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS)
    The next few months may be an exercise in airing the dirty laundry of members of the country’s Upper Chamber, as if Canadians needed more fodder to fuel their disappointment in the 148-year-old institution.

    A new poll from Angus Reid suggests an overwhelming number of Canadians want the Senate to change.

    According the the poll, conducted between March 11 and 12, 45 per cent of respondents said the Senate should be reformed and 41 per cent said the Upper Chamber should be outright abolished. Only 14 per cent said the Senate should stay as it is.

    Respondents also don’t trust any of the political parties in the House of Commons to fix the Senate.

    Only 17 per cent said they trusted Prime Minister Stephen Harper to effectively deal with Senate issues, 16 per cent said the same for NDP leader Tom Mulcair and 15 per cent responded this way for Liberal leader Justin Trudeau.

    More than one third, or 34 per cent of respondents, said they trust “none of the above” to effectively deal with the

    Read More »from Canadians not satisfied with Senate status quo: poll
  • Prime Minister Stephen Harper speaks at an event in Miramichi, N.B., on Thursday, April 2, 2015 where it was announced a contract has been awarded to build a new federal payroll centre in northern New Brunswick. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Stephen MacGillivrayPrime Minister Stephen Harper speaks at an event in Miramichi, N.B., on Thursday, April 2, 2015 where it was announced a contract has been awarded to build a new federal payroll centre in northern New Brunswick. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Stephen MacGillivray

    Despite a drop in support, with public outcry over the government’s controversial anti-terror legislation and a lagging national economy, Prime Minister Stephen Harper looks set to return to 24 Sussex after Canadians head to the ballot box later this year, according to a new poll.

    The survey, conducted by EKOS research between March 25 and March 31, suggests there are some paradoxes at play. The public isn’t giving the country or the government high marks on direction and the prime minister has the worst approval rating of all the federal leaders.

    Yet, the public still intends to vote for Harper. This, according to EKOS, could come down to what’s perceived as “clear, consistent and values-based” messaging over the past few months on the part of the prime minister.

    When asked about federal vote intention, 32 per cent of respondents said they’d cast a ballot for the Conservatives. About 28 per cent are planning to vote Liberal, 23 per cent NDP with the Greens bringing up the rear at

    Read More »from Harper in lead despite slumping economy, approval rating: poll
  • Canada’s security watchdog needs more power, says Liberal MP

    Joyce Murray calls for stronger mandate for CSE commissioner's office

    Liberal defense critic Joyce Murray says giving the Communications Security Establishment commissioner’s office more teeth to do its job may be more important than giving the agency more funding and resources.

    The CSE commissioner is tasked with providing independent, external review of the country’s intelligence agencies to ensure they are complying with with Canadian law.

    In a report tabled in the House of Commons this week, the commissioner’s office noted that cost-sharing with the CSE’s initiatives and “fiscal restraint measures are reducing the flexibility of the office’s available funding.”

    The report suggests that as the CSE grows, the fiscal situation for the commissioner’s office isn’t keeping pace. According to the Toronto Star, the commissioner’s office has a team of about 10 people and a budget of $2 million. The CSE has over 2,000 employees and will be spending more than $500 million this year.

    Murray noted in an interview with Yahoo Canada News that this “raises the

    Read More »from Canada’s security watchdog needs more power, says Liberal MP
  • For the second time in six months, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has introduced a motion in the House of Commons committing Canada to war with the militants of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. Harper is shown rising to vote in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Monday March 30, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian WyldFor the second time in six months, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has introduced a motion in the House of Commons committing Canada to war with the militants of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. Harper is shown rising to vote in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Monday March 30, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld


    The rest of the spring sitting is looking to be a busy number of weeks. After MPs take a two week recess from April 3 to April 17, it’s full steam ahead for parliamentarians until the House rises at the end of June. All of this, too, with a federal election on the horizon. Here are a few things to watch over the coming months:

    Finally, a budget date

    Finance Minister Joe Oliver finally announced the date that the federal budget drops this year: April 21. Ottawa has been waiting, and waiting, for the the budget date, which typically comes in February or March, but was delayed this year on account of slumping oil prices and the damage done to Canada’s economy.

    “We needed the time to obtain as much information as possible to make reasoned fiscal decisions and receive current forecasts from our independent economic advisors whose projections we rely on,” Oliver told reporters at a press conference in Toronto on Thursday.

    The Conservatives have promised to balance the federal government’s

    Read More »from Disgraced Senators and debates over child care: 5 things to watch in Ottawa this spring
  • Justice Minister Peter MacKay (left), Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Minister Steven Blaney, CSIS director Michel Coulombe and RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson arrive at the Commons public safety committee hearing witnesses on Bill C-51, Anti-terrorism Act on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Tuesday March 10, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian WyldJustice Minister Peter MacKay (left), Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Minister Steven Blaney, CSIS director Michel Coulombe and RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson arrive at the Commons public safety committee hearing witnesses on Bill C-51, Anti-terrorism Act on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Tuesday March 10, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld


    Not one of the more than 100 amendments submitted by opposition parties to try and change the government’s much-criticized anti-terror bill were adopted as a House of Commons committee wrapped up its study of the legislation

    During a clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-51 that ran late into Tuesday evening, the public safety and national security committee voted down all the amendments proposed by the NDP, Liberals and Green Party.

    The bill on the whole was passed in committee with Conservatives and Liberals voting in favour, and the NDP against.

    NDP public safety critic Randall Garrison said the Conservatives used their majority on the committee to block any changes.

    “I’m frustrated on behalf of Canadians because 45 out of 49 witnesses called for significant changes of the bill and we didn’t get any,” Garrison tells Yahoo Canada News on Wednesday.

    The committee began studying C-51 near the beginning of March and sat through, what may have seemed like to some, a lightning speed

    Read More »from Bill C-51 wraps up at committee with few changes

Pagination

(2,816 Stories)