Daily Buzz

World Naked Bike Ride protests everything in Australia

Australians braved their bike seats in the nude this weekend in protest of a whole list of issues that plague our world.

The World Naked Bike Ride is a yearly demonstration about problems that participants feel are best represented by a hoard of naked bodies peddling the streets. What isn't, really?

[ Related: Extreme Mountain Unicycling not a sport for the meek ]

The mission statement on the event's website describes the scope of its purpose.

We face automobile traffic with our naked bodies as the best way of defending our dignity and exposing the unique dangers faced by cyclists and pedestrians plus all the negative effects of oil, cars, war, consumerism and non-renewable energy.

A longer description adds to the list body image, health problems and everyday violence. Clearly, the message here is that getting naked will save the world.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 03: (EDITORS NOTE: IMAGE CONTAINS NUDITY) Naked cyclists take part in the World Naked Bike Ride on March 3, 2013 in Melbourne, Australia. The bike ride is intended to ... more 
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 03: (EDITORS NOTE: IMAGE CONTAINS NUDITY) Naked cyclists take part in the World Naked Bike Ride on March 3, 2013 in Melbourne, Australia. The bike ride is intended to "peacefully expose the vulnerability of cyclists, humanity and nature in the face of cars, aggression, consumerism and non-renewable energy". (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images) less 
1 / 4
Getty Images | Photo By Scott Barbour / Getty Images
Sun, 3 Mar, 2013 1:06 AM EST
To their credit, the organizers have built a connection between their nudity and the issues at hand. They note that health and violence become tied to environmental issues because of competition for resources and polluted air.

Plus, they've found fascinating ways to decorate their skin and discovered that combining a lei, helmet and running shoes is a great look.

[ Related: Toronto cab passenger apologizes online after hitting cyclist ]

Riders covered almost 4 kilometres of road in Melbourne, giving the public a nice, long look at what cycling means to Australia.

Want the latest buzz before it goes viral?
Follow @ydailybuzz on Twitter!