• High beef prices to stay for years to come, says Guelph analystHigh beef prices to stay for years to come, says Guelph analyst

     

    City councillors in Edmonton — the capital of Alberta cattle country — are being asked to buck the beef from catered council meetings.

    The city’s youth council is bringing a motion to council this week to consider making council’s catered meals vegetarian.

    The youth council themselves have gone vegan for their meetings.

    The group, which aims to involve Edmonton youths in local government by allowing them to advise and offer feedback to council, says the meatless meals are more environmentally sustainable.

    The vote this week will be whether to ask city administrators to prepare a policy for council to vote on at a later date – so Edmonton city councillors have some time before they stake the steak.

    The youth council, which did not respond to a request for comment, says in its report to Edmonton councillors that one meal a month is not a drastic change in lifestyle.

    But vegetarian and vegan meals have a significantly lower environmental impact than omnivorous meals, it argues.

    Read More »from Edmonton council urged to go meatless at catered meetings
  • P.E.I. potato tampering leads off question periodP.E.I. potato tampering leads off question period

    Finding the culprit who stuck needles into P.E.I. potatoes is proving to be as challenging as finding a needle in a haystack.

    A team of investigators with the Prince Edward Island RCMP is currently following a slew of tips concerning the tampering of potatoes in the tiny province.

    Last October, police received a complaint from a French fry processing plantthat had found sewing needles lodged in some of the potatoes. Workers there were able to contain the contaminated product before it left the plant.

    The next day, RCMP received another complaint, this time from someone who’d found a tampered potato that had been bought at a grocery store.

    That’s when officials alerted the public with their safety concerns. Since then, other Atlantic provinces have found tampered potatoes, which trace back to P.E.I.

    "The investigation hasn’t stopped; it’s been ongoing,” Sgt. Leanne Butler with the P.E.I. RCMP told Yahoo Canada News. “It’s a priority to solve this matter.”

    Complaints received in recent

    Read More »from P.E.I. potato tampering reward climbs to $500K
  • A well-intentioned effort to honour Canadian war dead buried overseas with a memorial in their homeland has become mired in controversy. But despite the Conservative government’s backing, it’s unlikely to affect the party’s prospects this fall.

    Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s near decade in power has featured a marked increase in the military’s profile, especially its historical contributions, even if government’s dealing with veterans have sometimes raised doubts about his sincerity.

    It’s not surprising the Conservatives got behind a plan by Toronto businessman Tony Trigiani to erect a massive new memorial to Canada’s fallen on Nova Scotia’s Atlantic coast, a kind of bookend to the much beloved Vimy Memorial in France.

    In fact, the giant statue, dubbed Mother Canada by Trigiani’s Never Forgotten National Memorial Foundation, would even be in direct line of site with Vimy.

    “It symbolizes the welcoming home of over 114,000 souls that are buried in 2,500-plus cemeteries around the world

    Read More »from Mother Canada war memorial controversy stretches from Ottawa to Cape Breton
  • Rapist and convicted murderer applies for day parole. Tim Danson, lawyer and advocate for the families of Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy, gives his responseRapist and convicted murderer applies for day parole. Tim Danson, lawyer and advocate for the families of Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy, gives his response
    Reports that Canada’s most notorious murderer and rapist Paul Bernardo will be applying for day parole have raised questions into how Canada’s legal system works when it comes to the release of prisoners.

     

    The Corrections and Conditional Release Act (CCRA) states that all offenders must be considered for some form of conditional release during their sentence. However, just because they are eligible, doesn’t mean an inmate will be granted parole.

     

    The Parole Board of Canada (PBC) will review the offender's risk to the public when they become eligible for all types of conditional release, with the exception of statutory release.

     

    Isabel Grant, professor at the University of British Columbia’s Peter A. Allard School of Law says, "The odds of Bernardo getting day parole are extraordinarily minuscule," since he is designated a dangerous offender and is serving life in prison with no chances of parole for 25 years for raping and murdering Leslie Mahaffy and Kristen French.

     

    "I’d be
    Read More »from What you need to know about parole in Canada
  • Uber facing a rough ride in Canada and abroad

    Uber is to suspend its uberPOP service in FranceUber is to suspend its uberPOP service in France

    Toronto taxi drivers are threatening to gridlock the city during the upcoming Pan Am Games to force officials to put the brakes on the controversial ride-share company Uber, which is facing growing opposition in Canada, Europe and Asia.

    Sajid Mughal, spokesman for the iTaxiworkers Association, says Uber drivers have taken between 40 and 50 per cent of cab business in Toronto as city and police turn a blind eye to bylaws that would curtail the company.

    “UberX is taking most of the cab business and the cab drivers are suffering,” Mughal tells Yahoo Canada News. “The city is not doing its job.”

    He says cab drivers have not made a final decision on when they will block streets in protest – or even if they will – but they will meet in the next few days to decide. The Pan Am Games begin July 10.

    “Drivers are so frustrated by now that they are thinking of taking action against Uber,” Mughal says. “If the city is not taking any action, we have to raise our voice. We don’t want anything to

    Read More »from Uber facing a rough ride in Canada and abroad
  • FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2013 file photo, Travelers pass through a corridor at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia. As the Justice Department launches an investigation into possible collusion in the airline industry, experts say the government faces the burden of proving that the carriers were deliberately signaling business decisions to each other. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2013 file photo, Travelers pass through a corridor at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia. As the Justice Department launches an investigation into possible collusion in the airline industry, experts say the government faces the burden of proving that the carriers were deliberately signaling business decisions to each other. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

    Canadian and Ukrainian researchers are working together to build a portable device that soldiers, police and border agents could use to covertly detect concealed weapons and deter security threats.

    The NATO-funded research project is headed up on the Canadian side by McMaster University electrical and computer engineering professor Natalia Nikolova.

    “Part of this project is building collaboration with Ukraine and helping them acquire adequate instruments and equipment,” Nikolova told Yahoo Canada News.

    “So, the goals of this project are not purely technical; they have significant social and political impact as well.”

    1The idea is to equip soldiers and law-enforcement officials with portable devices that could detect concealed guns and explosives up to 15 metres away.

    These devices could be used at airports, borders or crowded events — anywhere a security threat may be looming — to stop disasters before they start.

    Imagine if Michael Zehaf-Bibeau’s rifle had been detected before he

    Read More »from Canadian, Ukrainian engineers designing portable concealed weapons detector
  •  

    A WestJet aircraft is pictured on the tarmac in Ottawa on Thursday. The airline has suffered a rash of threats over the past week, grounding several flights and affecting travel for passengers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean KilpatrickA WestJet aircraft is pictured on the tarmac in Ottawa on Thursday. The airline has suffered a rash of threats over the past week, grounding several flights and affecting travel for passengers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
    It hasn’t been smooth sailing for crew and passengers aboard WestJet and Air Canada domestic flights this week. Investigations are underway into five bomb threats that forced a series of emergency landings in four cities across the country. In one incident, St. John's airport officials were also forced to evacuate a building.

    But one security expert says passengers shouldn’t be nervous to fly, despite the slew of flight diversions that have taken place across the country since June 25.

    “If a terrorist wants to blow up an airplane, they put the bomb on the airplane, they don’t keep calling in,” says Andre Gerolymatos, a history professor at Simon Fraser University who specializes in security and terrorism. “Every time they call, they make the authorities more aware of it and make them much sharper.”

    With this past week’s spike in disturbances, WestJet has managed to reduce the time it takes to confirm the hoax. The first, incident, a June 27 WestJet flight from Edmonton to Halifax

    Read More »from Travellers shouldn’t be nervous to fly after bomb threats, expert says
  • The undo send button is shown on a Gmail account as employees work on their computers in Toronto on Wednesday, June 24, 2015. Gmail has implemented a new feature that allows people to undo a sent email. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan DenetteThe undo send button is shown on a Gmail account as employees work on their computers in Toronto on Wednesday, June 24, 2015. Gmail has implemented a new feature that allows people to undo a sent email. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

    Last week, Google made some news by giving users an easier way to undo sent emails on Gmail. For most, the ability to undo a sent message was a thing of legend, despite being available for several years. The fabled feature was buried beneath menus and wasn't all that easy to find unless you thoroughly explored the settings.

    But Google isn’t the only one with secrets, there are many popular apps and social media sites that boast little-used settings and features that could prove convenient in a jam.

    Facebook

    If you ever wanted a complete rundown of everything you've ever posted to Facebook, you can do that with the simple click of a link. At the top right of the Facebook home page, click the settings icon and then click on 'See More Settings'. Hit the 'General Settings' tab on the left and scroll down to find the 'Download a copy of your Facebook data' link. Now you'll have a comprehensive treasure trove of pictures, posts and other stuff which will make for a fun walk through memory

    Read More »from The Facebook, Whatsapp, Twitter, Instagram features you may not know exist
  • Rachel DolezalRachel Dolezal

     We’ve always been a self-centered bunch. How could we not be? After all, there’s nothing more egotistical than being human, tethered to your own mind with only guesses at what others may actually be thinking.

    Social media has bolstered this view of the world, made it easier to justify this self-centricity, to curate our identities and present ourselves to the world in the way we want to be seen. That used to be a privilege reserved for public figures and celebrities, now we can make ourselves whoever we would like to be.

    Unfortunately, the are limits to the identities we curate, especially if we build them on lies as in the case of Rachel Dolezal, a former chapter leader at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People who was outed for being white.

    Dr. Camille Hernandez-Ramdwar, associate professor of sociology and academic coordinator of Caribbean Studies at Ryerson University likens Dolezal’s case to Grey Owl, a British-born Canadian immigrant who adopted a First

    Read More »from Is it really possible to be 'transethnic'?
  • Timmins Public Library has reversed a decision that only allowed boys to participate in a robotics summer program after a nine-year-old girl started an online petition.Timmins Public Library has reversed a decision that only allowed boys to participate in a robotics summer program after a nine-year-old girl started an online petition.

    When nine-year-old Cash Cayen tried to sign up for a summer robotics session at the Timmins Public Library, she was told it was for boys only.

    So, with the help of her mom, she started a Change.org petition asking the library to let girls participate too — and it worked thanks to the public's support.

    “She will be allowed in the program, as will any others wishing to take part,” Timmins Mayor Steven Black told Yahoo Canada News.

    The controversy began when Cash, an avid participant in local library activities, tried to sign up for a July 20 robotics event, but was turned away because of her gender.

    The library's summer newsletter describes the event, hosted by Science Timmins, as "Robotics For Boys ONLY!"

    “Even after speaking to the Assistant Library Director Elaine De Bonis, where I explained that I have been participating in library programming since I was only a few months old I was still turned away,” she explained in her Change.org petition, which netted more than 9,000 signatures

    Read More »from Timmins Public Library reverses decision on boys-only robotics event after girl's petition

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