• Late last week, B.C.’s Delta Police Department scrapped an online promotional campaign for a bracelet supporting an officer currently facing murder charges.

    According to the Vancouver Sun, the campaign was scrubbed because of complaints that the sale showed a bias toward the accused police officer.

    What followed was an argument about how far local police could go in showing support for one of their own, as he works his way through court for the 2012 shooting of a suspect in a five-hour police standoff.

    It was a small incident, which received little attention outside of the community. But it speaks to a larger issue playing out across North America.

    There is a heightened level of concern about how police officers are perceived at the moment.

    After several high-profile deaths at the hands of U.S. police in recent months, followed by the fatal shootings of two on-duty New York Police Officers, authorities are turning on one another, claiming that a bias against police is clouding public

    Read More »from Is a growing anti-police sentiment putting Canadian officers in jeopardy?
  • Dalhousie dental scandal protests draw range of protesters. (CBC)Dalhousie dental scandal protests draw range of protesters. (CBC)

    A rally was held today at Dalhousie University’s Halifax campus to express their outrage at the school’s decision to address complaints of misogyny with “restorative justice.”

    CBC reports about 200 students gathered in opposition to the disciplinary measures chosen by the university in response to comments made on a Facebook group called the Dalhousie “Gentlemen’s Club,” the members of which are part of Dal’s school of dentistry. Those comments included plans for sexual assault on female classmates, and the proposition of using nitrous oxide and chloroform to carry out those plans.

    The outrage on campus and across Canada in response to the comments themselves was exacerbated when Dalhousie President Richard Florizone announced the students would not be expelled, or even suspended, and instead be punished through something called “restorative justice.”

    "The restorative justice process is collaborative and inclusive of the parties involved, with a view to developing outcomes that ensure

    Read More »from Dalhousie University's choice of punishment for Facebook misogyny met with outrage
  • In this Dec. 17, 2014 file photo, a poster for the movie The Interview is carried away (AP Photo)In this Dec. 17, 2014 file photo, a poster for the movie The Interview is carried away (AP Photo)

    Taylor Scollon, meet George Clooney.

    George Clooney, Taylor Scollon.

    The two of you have a great deal in common. Most notably, you are both determined to get the controversially-cancelled movie “The Interview” in front of an audience.

    In Taylor’s case, that audience is in Toronto. That work for you, George?

    Scollon has launched an online campaign to screen “The Interview” in Toronto, after several movies theatre chains across North America refused to show the film and Sony Pictures Entertainment eventually pulled its release amid terror threats.

    The film, starring James Franco and Seth Rogen, is a satirical comedy about an assassination attempt on North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.


    Related stories:

    An interview with someone who has seen 'The Interview'

    Sony Pictures hack may be costliest cyberattack ever

    Sony Pictures stops Christmas release of 'The Interview' after Canadian, U.S. theatres pull film


    The controversial topic prompted a group of cyber terrorists known as Guardians of

    Read More »from 'The Interview' may still see theatres with screenings planned in Toronto, Montreal
  • Rinelle Harper speaks at the Assembly of First Nations Election in Winnipeg on Dec. 9, 2014. (CP)Rinelle Harper speaks at the Assembly of First Nations Election in Winnipeg on Dec. 9, 2014. (CP)

    As we roll toward another year, the prime minister affirmed once again that there are no plans for a national public inquiry into Canada’s high rate of murdered or missing aboriginal women, saying that the matter was not “high on our radar.”

    Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his federal government continue to reject calls for a formal study into the prevalence of aboriginal women whose lives end in violence, with opponents calling his latest tact unnecessarily “callous” and another sign that things won’t change.

    “I’m not asking this government anymore to have a national inquiry,” said Michele Audette, president of the Native Women’s Association of Canada. “I wouldn’t believe at all in that process if he was putting something in place.”

    During an end-of-year interview with CBC News, Prime Minister Stephen Harper reiterated that an inquiry was not a priority for the government at this time.

    "[I]t isn’t really high on our radar, to be honest," Harper said in his interview with Peter

    Read More »from Year of heartbreak for aboriginal community doesn't shift Harper's stance on murdered women inquiry
  • A security guard stands at the entrance of a theater during the premiere of 'The Interview.' (Reuters)A security guard stands at the entrance of a theater during the premiere of 'The Interview.' (Reuters)

    UPDATE (Dec. 17/14, 5:07 PM ET): Sony pictures has released a statement saying they will not release The Interview on December 25 as planned. They do not give any indication if the movie will be released at a later date.

    Original story follows:

    If you’re looking forward to seeing James Franco’s latest movie, you’re going to be disappointed, at least for the time being.

    The controversial comedy The Interview is scheduled for released on Christmas Day, but the threat of attacks on movie theatres that air the film have prompted several chains to scuttle their plans.

    Including here in Canada.

    Five major America theatre chains have already announced they will not play Sony’s The Interview. And Canada’s Cineplex Entertainment chain now says it will “postpone” showing the video until the perceived danger is gone.

    "After careful consideration of

    Read More »from Sony Pictures stops Christmas release of 'The Interview' after Canadian, U.S. theatres pull film
  • Photo of two hosts from the Jeff O'Neil Show posing with guests. (Facebook)Photo of two hosts from the Jeff O'Neil Show posing with guests. (Facebook)

    Is it society’s increasing inability to be shocked, or simply the breadth of entertainment options now available that causes radio DJs to push their comedic attempts too far?

    Or has it always been this way, and the listeners are the ones who have changed?

    Regardless, another shock jock controversy has erupted in Canada, this time at a Vancouver-based station that has issued an apology for a segment discussing an upcoming interview with Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau.

    According to the Georgia Straight, the incident occurred during a Tuesday morning simulcast from CFOX and CKNW, in which host Jeff O’Neil urged two CFAX guest hosts (both local Global TV personalities) to play a game of “Eff, Kill or Marry,” with Trudeau.

    The game would have required the federal party leader to pick the fates of Laureen Harper, the wife of Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Health Minister Rona Ambrose and former governor general Michaëlle Jean.

    The audio was briefly available online, but has since been taken

    Read More »from Vancouver radio station sorry for 'Eff, Kill or Marry' segment involving Justin Trudeau
  • A would-be Canadian millionaire is running out of time to change his or her life. A deadline is fast approaching for someone who purchased a winning Lotto Max Maxmillions ticket in Milton, Ont., last year.

    The $1 million prize has never been claimed and, unlike a high profile case in which the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corp. tracked down a $50 million winner last year, they won’t run a similar search this time around.

    Nor should they. Those seeking their fortune through randomly generated number pairings should at least accept the responsibility of maintaining their own records.

    OLG announced earlier this week that the ticket, purchased on Dec. 20, 2013, was about to reach its one-year expiration date.

    "Anyone possessing this ticket should fill in the back portion, sign it and contact the OLG Prize Centre at 20 Dundas Street West in Toronto before 6 p.m. on Monday, December 22, 2014," the lotto agency stated.

    For the record, the winning numbers were 2,3,9,10,17,32 and 34.

    The OLG

    Read More »from Ontario's $1 million lottery winner only has a few days left to claim their winnings
  • Pedestrians using their mobile phone walk past an electronic board in Tokyo. (Reuters)Pedestrians using their mobile phone walk past an electronic board in Tokyo. (Reuters)

    Wandering into traffic without looking both ways; bumping into passersby while your head is in the Cloud; tripping while texting.

    This isn’t how we were trained as children to act while walking near traffic. Yet more often than ever before, Canadians seem to be taking their safety for granted by walking while distracted.

    And one Calgary city councillor thinks it has to stop.

    “It’s quite apparent now, and it’s across North America, that everybody’s involved in their electronics,” Councillor Ward Sutherland told CTV News this week. “They have their heads down, they’re not paying attention. Just the attitude that, I have the right and you better stop for me is not smart, safe thinking to begin with.”

    Oftentimes, the pedestrians are as much to blame as the drivers [for collisions], or more so.
    —Staff Sgt. Paul Stacey

    The Calgary councillor says distracted driving laws should be expanded to address inattentive pedestrians as well, perhaps fining those that threaten themselves and

    Read More »from Councillor says Calgary should consider 'distracted walking' fine
  • An iceberg is seen off Ammassalik Island in Eastern Greenland, July 19, 2007. (CP)An iceberg is seen off Ammassalik Island in Eastern Greenland, July 19, 2007. (CP)

    The battle for the North Pole heated up this week when Denmark made official overtures for the icy region and its natural resources.

    The claim, which was submitted to the United Nations on Monday, contests conflicting claims from Russia and Canada, and further complicates a convoluted series of declarations of ownership in the Arctic.

    In recent years, the diplomatic battle for ownership of the Arctic Circle has become one of the highest-stakes struggles on the board.

    With an uncertain, but surely extensive, amount of natural resources at stake, every country with any semblance of a legitimate claim to the region has declared themselves the rightful owner.

    It is like Game of Thrones, if the Arctic Circle was the Iron Throne, each country was a noble house of Westeros, and the whole saga played out beyond the Wall.

    Sure there are no dire wolves or incest, but there is exponential wealth at stake. The region is said to contain about 13 per cent of the world’s undiscovered oil and 30 per

    Read More »from Who owns the North Pole? Denmark makes case against Canada's, Russia's claims
  • Rob Ford says cancerous tumour has shrunk, doctors considering surgery

    Toronto's outgoing Mayor Rob Ford stands next to his brother Doug as he scrums with the media. (CP photo)Toronto's outgoing Mayor Rob Ford stands next to his brother Doug as he scrums with the media. (CP photo)

    Is it too early to break out the Ford 2018 T-shirts?

    The Toronto Sun's Joe Warmington reports that former Toronto mayor Rob Ford has received news that the tumour in his abdomen has shrunk to the point that doctors are considering surgery to remove it.

    "This is a good news story," Ford told The Sun.

    Ford was diagnosed with a rare liposarcoma in September, which forced him to bow out of the Toronto mayoral race, which was eventually won by John Tory in October. Instead, Ford ran for his old council seat in Ward 2 Etobicoke North, which he won handily.

    According to Ford, doctors told him that the tumour has been reduced by more than 50%.

    "The tumour has shrunk from 13 centimetres to six centimetres," he said. "It is a lot smaller."

    Ford began his fifth chemotherapy session on Monday. He said the next steps would include radiation and surgery.

    "They told me this should be my last round of chemotherapy and next they will do radiation before having a surgery," Ford said. "I have been

    Read More »from Rob Ford says cancerous tumour has shrunk, doctors considering surgery

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