• Lottery balls (Thinkstock)Lottery balls (Thinkstock)

    Everyone has their own version of the scenario stored away in the mind’s eye, an image of where you are, who you’re with, and what you’re doing when you win the jackpot of your dreams. But let’s say the moment actually materializes, and you win the lottery. What comes next?

     The answer depends on how much you’ve won. If it’s under $1,000 in Ontario, for example, the retailer where you bought the ticket can dole out the cash. (Lotteries across the country have only slight variations in their methods for processing winning tickets.) Over a grand and you’re asked to travel to Toronto—to the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG) Prize Center —with your signed ticket and two pieces of government I.D. Residents in far-flung towns can claim a prize at a satellite center if the cost of travel would eat up most of their lotto spoils.

     The ticket will be checked out, your signature and identity verified. The sometimes stickier procedure happens next, when the gaming authority determines

    Read More »from Lotto drama: What happens before winners take home a jackpot?
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    Ask the Torontonians most affected by it to define “carding” and they’ll tell you it’s a new name for a decades-old problem: random police checks that target young African-Canadian men.

    The practice was once called “intervention” and before that “street checks.” The police now label it community “engagement.” The name everyone else tends to use—carding—is a reference to the contact cards police have been using for about 10 years to collect information about those who are stopped and questioned.

    According to a series of investigative reports by the Toronto Star, people stopped for the sake of engagement between 2008 and 2013 were more likely to be African-Canadian than white and the vast majority of encounters did not involve an arrest or charges. Nevertheless, details about each individual—including one’s name, age, perceived skin colour, estimated height, and weight, and often the names of one’s friends—were recorded and entered into a massive database. The Star reporters found that

    Read More »from Toronto Police controversy: What is 'carding' and is it legal?
  • Demonstrators gather in front of Queen's Park to protest against Ontario's new sex education curriculum in Toronto on Tuesday, February 24, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren CalabreseDemonstrators gather in front of Queen's Park to protest against Ontario's new sex education curriculum in Toronto on Tuesday, February 24, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

    Some time around 2010, stories began circulating on the Internet about a sexually transmitted disease called “Blue Waffle.” Use your imagination.

    For five years now, sexual health educators throughout Canada and the United States have been fielding questions about the disease which, according to web wisdom, is only passed from women to men and may be the result of poor hygiene or an overactive sex life. It does not exist.

    That may seem laughable, except that it’s a sexual myth that persists among tweens and teens and even people old enough to vote and buy beer. And it’s just one of many.

    Lyba Spring spent nearly 30 years as a sexual health educator for Toronto Public Health. Now retired, she is a private sexual health educator and consultant and a blogger on sexual health issues.

    Over the years, she’s fielded many questions from teens that convinced her that Ontario needed a relevant, updated sex education curriculum: Can masturbation make you a non-virgin? Can you get an infection

    Read More »from Sex ed vs. the Internet in Ontario curriculum debate
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    The protest against a new sex-education program in Ontario schools continues with no sign the provincial government is ready to revisit the controversial curriculum.

    Parents opposed to the new curriculum on cultural and religious grounds are staging a boycott, pulling their children out of school and holding rallies. The protest is centred mainly in Metro Toronto, where CBC News reported more than 40,000 kids were absent on Monday.

    Andrew Morrison, a spokesman for the Ontario Ministry of Education, said pockets of absences have been reported in other communities, including London, Windsor and Ottawa, but had no figures.

    Not everyone opposed to the new program is keeping their children out for the whole week.

    “Today we’re not doing protest,” Christine Liu of the recently formed Parents Alliance of Ontario, told Yahoo Canada News on Tuesday. “Among the Chinese community we’re only doing protests for one day in May but we will do protests in September in a bigger scope.

    Read More »from The Ontario sex-ed debate: Catching up with Canada or hidden agenda?
  • High crime in Canada’s North

    People walk along a path in Iqaluit, Nunavut on Tuesday, December 9, 2014. A long-running study concludes that the well-being of northerners in Canada's Arctic compares poorly with those in many other Arctic regions around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean KilpatrickPeople walk along a path in Iqaluit, Nunavut on Tuesday, December 9, 2014. A long-running study concludes that the well-being of northerners in Canada's Arctic compares poorly with those in many other Arctic regions around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

    The crime rate per capita in Canada’s northern communities is more than double the rate in southern Canada, says a new report by Statistics Canada.

    For the first time, the federal statistical agency has looked at the northern portions of the provinces separately, for comparison to the more populated south.

    The authors found that in 2013, there were 10,425 crimes reported by police per 100,000 residents of the provincial north, compared to 4,749 in the south, the report says.

    In the territories, the rate was seven times higher, with 34,594 crimes reported by police per 100,000 residents.

    “Everything – murder is higher, assaults are higher, sexual assaults are higher. Just generally speaking, every single offence is higher in the north than in the south,” Mary Allen, one of the authors of the report, tells Yahoo Canada News.

    “Robbery and extortion are the only two offences that are lower.”

    In all regions, the majority of incidents were non-violent – about 80 per cent. Overall, the crime

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    Kaiba Gionfriddo was the first baby saved by the revolutionary 3D printing technique.Kaiba Gionfriddo was the first baby saved by the revolutionary 3D printing technique.
    3D printing technology is exploding, with exciting new applications turning up every day.  

    But few could be more compelling than saving babies’ lives.

    Dr. Glenn Green, Associate Professor of pediatric otolaryngology at the University of Michigan, is at the forefront of a bold new surgical technique.  He’s using special implants – printed on a 3D printer – to treat children with tracheobronchomalacia, a frequently fatal abnormality of the windpipe.

    “I had been seeing these kids for many years in my career,” Dr. Green told Yahoo Canada.  “A lot of times, their windpipes are compressed from the outside, so they’re actually strangulated by blood vessels or weakness of their cartilage.”

    Windpipe collapse.  And no way to prevent it.

    “We were having a meeting in the college and somebody said ‘if you had a million dollars, what would you do with it?’ and I said I would find an answer to this disease.”  

    Working alongside bioengineer Scott Hollister at the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital in Ann

    Read More »from 3D printing saving babies from fatal condition
  • Dalhousie dentistry student speaks for 1st time about Facebook scandalDalhousie dentistry student speaks for 1st time about Facebook scandal


    It has not been the final year they must have imagined, but fourth-year students from Dalhousie’s Dentistry School will don graduation gowns this month and bring an end to what has been a year many in the Class of 2015 likely can’t wait to put behind them.

    Most of them will graduate, anyway.

    University president Richard Florizone has suggested that not all of the male students who posted sexually violent comments about classmates on a Facebook “gentlemen’s club” have qualified for graduation.

    With spring convocation on May 29, it’s unclear how many will don caps and gowns.

    “Dentistry students can work on clinic requirementsright up to the day before graduation,” university spokesman Brian Leadbetter says in an email response to a request for an interview.

    “As is the case every year in the Faculty of Dentistry, some students may not have completed their clinical requirements in order to graduate in Spring Convocation. That may be the case this year, but it is premature to speculate at

    Read More »from Dalhousie dentistry students prep for graduation after Facebook scandal
  • McLaren 570SMcLaren 570S

    The numbers Chris Green tosses out as he leads a walk-around tour of McLaren’s new 570S sports car would cause any gear head to geek out.

    The orange waist-high, scissor-doored road rocket weighs about the same as a Toyota Corolla, which is unremarkable unless that Corolla is packing the British car’s 562 horsepower turbocharged V-8 engine.

    It’s enough to propel the McLaren to 100 kilometres an hour in a blink over three seconds, says Green, McLaren’s national brand manager. It will reach 200 km/h in 9.5 seconds, about as long as it takes the Corolla to get to 100, and has a top speed of 328 km/h (204 mph).

    Fuel economy, if you must know, is estimated at around 11 litres per 100 km, possibly achieved by putting a raw egg between your right foot and the gas pedal.

    But it’s the car’s price (not official since deliveries won’t start till fall) that will keep the 570S literally a dream machine for all but a few lucky Canadians – roughly $215,000-$230,000. It is, says Green, McLaren’s entry

    Read More »from Super high-end car sales on the upswing in Canada
  • Canadian defendant Omar Khadr sits during a hearing at the U.S. Military Commissions court for war crimes, at the U.S. Naval Base, in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Jan. 19, 2009. The federal government is planning to seek an emergency stay of an Alberta judge's decision to grant former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr bail, The Canadian Press has learned. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Janet Hamlin, PoolCanadian defendant Omar Khadr sits during a hearing at the U.S. Military Commissions court for war crimes, at the U.S. Naval Base, in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Jan. 19, 2009. The federal government is planning to seek an emergency stay of an Alberta judge's decision to grant former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr bail, The Canadian Press has learned. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Janet Hamlin, Pool

    Omar Khadr’s lawyer says the Canadian government – despite losing 10 straight court challenges – continues to pull out all the stops and spend millions of taxpayers’ dollars to keep his client in jail.

    Khadr, who was once held at Guantanamo Bay, is to be released on bail after a recent court ruling in Canada. That case is scheduled to be heard Tuesday in Edmonton.

    But lawyers for the federal government, which has stated in Parliament that it is opposed to his release, have scheduled a surprise hearing to try to derail the process, Khadr’s lawyer tells Yahoo Canada News.

    “We now have two hearings - first is the stay of proceedings and then in the afternoon we have an already scheduled hearing,” Khadr’s lawyer, Dennis Edney said in a telephone interview Monday.

    Calls for an explanation about the government’s stay application by Yahoo Canada Newshave not been returned.

    The federal government’s application is to be heard by Alberta’s Court of Appeal just hours before another court hearing

    Read More »from Taxpayers apathetic that Ottawa spending millions to fight Khadr case: lawyer
  • A silent upheaval is happening across schools in Canada and the US. On the surface, it appears to be about dress codes, but in reality it’s the first wave of a vocal uprising from students around puberty and sexualization in schools, according to one expert.

    In early April, a 15-word post went up on Tumblr with a picture that quickly went viral.

     

    the Tumblr post that went viral.the Tumblr post that went viral.

    Signs like this have been appearing in schools across North America for the last couple of years, but nobody is really talking about them. The issue, at first glance, is straightforward: dress codes that unfairly target girls.

    But the issue isn’t nearly that simple, says Dr. Gabrielle Morrissey, a human sexuality and relationships expert. The signs aren’t just a way to argue against dress codes; they’re an important first step for teens to proclaim that they want to lead the conversation on matters of sexuality, gender equality and self-esteem.

    “It's almost like an anonymous "take back the night" campaign,” Morrissey told Yahoo Canada.

    Read More »from The hidden dress code message in school hallways

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