• Alex Tilley poses in this undated handout photo. (CP)Alex Tilley poses in this undated handout photo. (CP)
    The word iconic is an overused cliche in the retail world, but when it comes to Canadian brands, Tilley Endurables is right up there with Tim Hortons and Roots.

    So when founder Alex Tilley announced Tuesday via an ad in the Globe and Mail that he was selling his Toronto-based travel clothing and accessories company, you might have wondered if this is another Canadian company destined to pass into foreign hands, like Tim’s or Hudson’s Bay Co. (now owned by New York parent company NRDC Equity Partners).

    And even if it doesn’t, will a company so closely identified with one man’s vision prosper after he’s gone?

    Alex Tilley certainly hopes so, but admits he simply doesn’t know.

    "I haven’t the faintest idea what’s going to happen," Tilley told Yahoo Canada News in an interview. “I know whatever I daydream now will not come to happen. I don’t even worry about it.”

    Tilley is putting his company on the market because his daughters, who live in Hawaii, have no interest in taking it on. At age

    Read More »from With clothing-maker Tilley up for sale, iconic hat could cease to be Canadian
  • Drone's Eye View of the Toronto Reference Library (YouTube/Toronto Public Library)Drone's Eye View of the Toronto Reference Library (YouTube/Toronto Public Library)

    The Toronto Public Library would like to buy your books, in a novel pilot project that could help improve service and perhaps make the system run more efficiently.

    The program, which appears to be the first of its kind in Canada, is just one of several initiatives being taken by Canadian libraries to adapt their role in modern society, where they are perhaps as popular as ever but with tighter belts.

    Metro News reports that the Toronto Public Library launched the program in December, in a bid to reduce the wait times for popular fiction books such as the weeks-long delay it experienced for Us Conductors by Sean Michaels after it won the Giller Prize.

    The guidelines for book purchases are posted online. They must be in good condition and be included on a monthly-updated list of newly released adult fiction titles.

    January’s list includes just over 100 titles, including All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews, Gray Mountain by John Grisham and The Vacationers by Emma Straub.

    Accepted books

    Read More »from Toronto Public Library seeks to boost its catalogue — by buying your bestsellers
  • Fireworks explode in front of Sleeping Beauty Castle May 5, 2005 in Anaheim. (Getty)Fireworks explode in front of Sleeping Beauty Castle May 5, 2005 in Anaheim. (Getty)

    Canadians who have recently visited California’s Disneyland should be aware of a measles outbreak at the popular theme park, as pockets of cases are continuing to pop up among largely-unvaccinated population segments across North America.

    The Los Angeles Times reports that Disneyland was the site of a measles outbreak that spread to 26 people from four different states.

    The California Department of Public Health has confirmed as many as nine cases of the measles, noting that each person had visited Disneyland in late December. Of those seven confirmed cases, six were found in subjects who had never been vaccinated for measles (two were children who were too young for the shot).

    "Travellers to areas where measles is endemic can bring measles back to the U.S., resulting in limited domestic transmission of measles,” reads a statement from the health department.

    “Disney and other theme parks in California are international attractions and visitors come from many parts of the world,

    Read More »from Measles outbreak tied to Disneyland, Canadian travellers should be on alert
  • Rehtaeh Parsons is shown in a handout photo from a Facebook tribute page (CP)Rehtaeh Parsons is shown in a handout photo from a Facebook tribute page (CP)

    The father of Rehtaeh Parsons is being accused of violating cyberbullying laws – the same laws he helped pass in the wake of his daughter’s death.

    It would seem Glen Canning may have crossed the line when he recently posted a censored image relating to an ongoing sex scandal at Mount Saint Vincent University.

    Halifax’s Chronicle Herald reports that Canning raised public ire last week when he posted an explicit image that a professor had sent to a student, although the image Canning posted had been blacked out and nothing was visible.

    Nevertheless, it may have gone against the wording of Canada’s new cyberbullying laws, though Canning rejected the notion on Twitter.

    “It’s a black rectangle people. It shows nothing and identifies no one. It’s not nude, explicit, or graphic,” he tweeted.

    Last week, instructor

    Read More »from Did Rehtaeh Parsons' father breach Canada's cyberbullying laws?
  • Baerwald is hoping to cover a funding gap in her bats research with public donations. (Reuters)Baerwald is hoping to cover a funding gap in her bats research with public donations. (Reuters)

    A Calgary grad student is taking a page out of Zach Braff’s playbook and is asking the public to fund her personal project. Not to film an indie movie, but rather to study the migratory habits of bats.

    And she’s not alone. Crowdfunding – the hot funding strategy of the 21st century – has become a bit of a haven for scientific research and innovation as government funding dries up and money gets tight.

    University of Calgary’s Erin Baerwald recently took the leap into crowdfunded science, posting a call for assistance on Indiegogo for her doctoral research into the migratory pattern on bats and the impact of wind turbines.

    As of Tuesday morning, Baerwald had collected more than $6,000 toward her target of $15,000, much of it from those with a specific interest in her research topic.

    "There’s limited funds for basic research and things that aren’t going to make money, things that aren’t research and development (with an) industrial focus, it is a big problem," Baerwald told CBC News.

    Read More »from Bats and bacteria: Students, scientists turn to crowdfunding for research projects
  • Saanich Mayor Richard Atwell, right, reads a statement to the media Monday, Jan. 12, 2015. (CP)Saanich Mayor Richard Atwell, right, reads a statement to the media Monday, Jan. 12, 2015. (CP)

    You've likely heard of Occam's razor – the principle that the simplest answer is most often the correct one.

    But you may not have heard about Mel Lastman’s razor – the principle that there must always be at least one Canadian mayor making outrageous headlines.

    How else can you explain the past four years of Rob Ford in Toronto, or the sudden rise of Richard Atwell, the current embattled mayor of Saanich, B.C.?

    The newly-appointed Atwell made headlines this week after he admitted he had lied about having an extramarital affair and then ordering B.C. police to investigate an apparent covert conspiracy against his leadership.

    According to the Victoria Times-Colonist, Atwell confessed to the affair but accused spies of leaking details to the media about himself in a dispute with the woman’s boyfriend.

    He further claimed that city staff members installed spyware on his office computer and that he was being targeted by regional police.

    "[O]n Dec. 11 I became aware that a member of the

    Read More »from Saanich, B.C., Mayor Richard Atwell hints at covert conspiracy against his leadership
  • Newly-appointed Minister of Veterans Affairs Erin O'Toole leaves Rideau Hall in Ottawa on Monday, January 5, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean KilpatrickNewly-appointed Minister of Veterans Affairs Erin O'Toole leaves Rideau Hall in Ottawa on Monday, January 5, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
    If part of new Veterans Affairs Minister Erin O’Toole’s mandate was to mend the public relations fences trampled down by his predecessor Julian Fantino, he’s not off to an auspicious start.

    O’Toole, who replaced the politically tone-deaf former cop on Jan. 5, slowly has been reaching out to veterans organizations, but at least a couple of the more vocal dissidents say they have a feeling they’re going to remain frozen out.

    Prime Minister Stephen Harper demoted Fantino to junior defence minister last week as he prepared the Conservative government for its anticipated fall re-election campaign. Fantino’s apparent insensitivity to the concerns of disabled veterans and inability to sell policy changes by his department made him a political liability in what had become a high-profile portfolio.

    O’Toole, a one-time RCAF navigator turned Toronto corporate lawyer, is supposed to reset the government’s relationship with veterans, whose problems generally get a sympathetic reception from the

    Read More »from Some veterans groups say new minister still marginalizing them
  • An oilsands facility is seen from a helicopter near Fort McMurray, Alta., Tuesday, July 10, 2012. (CP)An oilsands facility is seen from a helicopter near Fort McMurray, Alta., Tuesday, July 10, 2012. (CP)

    Residents in Eastern and Atlantic Canada are increasingly looking towards the lucrative West for job opportunities, but a new survey shows that the emotional toll for those jobs is a steep one.

    A new survey out of Prince Edward Island shows the conflicting emotions at play when an Islander chooses to seek his or her fortunes in the west, often having to leave behind friends, family and children in the process.

    The authors of the ‘Out West’ survey say that many residents of P.E.I. are looking for an income more in line with their cost of living, prompting them to seek their fortunes in places like Alberta and Saskatchewan where the economies are booming. Companies are often willing to offer perks like flights home, in addition to higher salaries, to those willing to work out west at least temporarily.

    But Christy Morgan, owner of CollaborentHR – the firm that conducted the survey – notes that the emotional cost of leaving home is a major factor in deciding whether to move west.

    “It

    Read More »from Emotional toll is high for out-of-province workers seeking fortune in the Prairies
  • Frank Van Den Bleeken, who has spent the past 30 years in a Belgian prison. (IB Times)Frank Van Den Bleeken, who has spent the past 30 years in a Belgian prison. (IB Times)

    What if Canada had a right-to-die law and Justin Bourque, the guy who gunned down three Mounties in New Brunswick last year, wanted to make use of it, rather than spend at least the next 75 years in prison?

    It's not as absurd a question as it sounds. Canadians are headed into a renewed discussion on the right to die as the Supreme Court this year prepares to rule on a couple of constitutional challenges to the law forbidding assisted suicide and Quebec implements its dying with dignity legislation.

    What makes the discussion even more tangible is the debate going on in Europe after a rapist-murderer in Belgium who's spent 30 years behind bars successfully won court approval to die under the country's broad euthanasia law. Frank Van Den Bleeken, who was found not criminally responsible for his crimes, argued he could not psychologically deal with the prospect of ending his days in prison.

    The Belgian government ultimately blocked the decision this week, but meanwhile more than a dozen

    Read More »from Should inmates fed up with prison be allowed the right to die?
  • Leslie Roberts, Anchorman for Global News seen in Toronto on Dec. 17, 2007. (CP/Globe and Mail)Leslie Roberts, Anchorman for Global News seen in Toronto on Dec. 17, 2007. (CP/Globe and Mail)

    It came as a shock to many when Global Television news anchor Leslie Roberts was suspended this week. No one expected to see one of the preeminent faces of the Toronto news scene and three-decade veteran of the craft suddenly brought to his knees by allegations of unethical double-dipping.

    The Toronto Star reported on Thursday that Roberts was the co-owner of BuzzPR, a public relations firm that represented several businesses whose executives had appeared as guests on Roberts’ news program.

    It immediately raised questions of transparency, in an industry where the public trust is everything.

    "I’ve worked in the PR industry for over 30 years. I’ve never heard of such a thing," Carol Panasiuk, a veteran of the PR industry, told Yahoo Canada News on Friday.

    "You’re either a journalist or you are in the PR industry. You can’t have your foot in both camps. It is unheard of certainly from a PR perspective."

    Global Television has told the Canadian Press that Roberts had been suspended

    Read More »from TV anchor Leslie Roberts’ ethical breach 'unheard of' in PR industry

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