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    Kaiba Gionfriddo was the first baby saved by the revolutionary 3D printing technique.Kaiba Gionfriddo was the first baby saved by the revolutionary 3D printing technique.
    3D printing technology is exploding, with exciting new applications turning up every day.  

    But few could be more compelling than saving babies’ lives.

    Dr. Glenn Green, Associate Professor of pediatric otolaryngology at the University of Michigan, is at the forefront of a bold new surgical technique.  He’s using special implants – printed on a 3D printer – to treat children with tracheobronchomalacia, a frequently fatal abnormality of the windpipe.

    “I had been seeing these kids for many years in my career,” Dr. Green told Yahoo Canada.  “A lot of times, their windpipes are compressed from the outside, so they’re actually strangulated by blood vessels or weakness of their cartilage.”

    Windpipe collapse.  And no way to prevent it.

    “We were having a meeting in the college and somebody said ‘if you had a million dollars, what would you do with it?’ and I said I would find an answer to this disease.”  

    Working alongside bioengineer Scott Hollister at the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital in Ann

    Read More »from 3D printing saving babies from fatal condition
  • Dalhousie dentistry student speaks for 1st time about Facebook scandalDalhousie dentistry student speaks for 1st time about Facebook scandal


    It has not been the final year they must have imagined, but fourth-year students from Dalhousie’s Dentistry School will don graduation gowns this month and bring an end to what has been a year many in the Class of 2015 likely can’t wait to put behind them.

    Most of them will graduate, anyway.

    University president Richard Florizone has suggested that not all of the male students who posted sexually violent comments about classmates on a Facebook “gentlemen’s club” have qualified for graduation.

    With spring convocation on May 29, it’s unclear how many will don caps and gowns.

    “Dentistry students can work on clinic requirementsright up to the day before graduation,” university spokesman Brian Leadbetter says in an email response to a request for an interview.

    “As is the case every year in the Faculty of Dentistry, some students may not have completed their clinical requirements in order to graduate in Spring Convocation. That may be the case this year, but it is premature to speculate at

    Read More »from Dalhousie dentistry students prep for graduation after Facebook scandal
  • McLaren 570SMcLaren 570S

    The numbers Chris Green tosses out as he leads a walk-around tour of McLaren’s new 570S sports car would cause any gear head to geek out.

    The orange waist-high, scissor-doored road rocket weighs about the same as a Toyota Corolla, which is unremarkable unless that Corolla is packing the British car’s 562 horsepower turbocharged V-8 engine.

    It’s enough to propel the McLaren to 100 kilometres an hour in a blink over three seconds, says Green, McLaren’s national brand manager. It will reach 200 km/h in 9.5 seconds, about as long as it takes the Corolla to get to 100, and has a top speed of 328 km/h (204 mph).

    Fuel economy, if you must know, is estimated at around 11 litres per 100 km, possibly achieved by putting a raw egg between your right foot and the gas pedal.

    But it’s the car’s price (not official since deliveries won’t start till fall) that will keep the 570S literally a dream machine for all but a few lucky Canadians – roughly $215,000-$230,000. It is, says Green, McLaren’s entry

    Read More »from Super high-end car sales on the upswing in Canada
  • Canadian defendant Omar Khadr sits during a hearing at the U.S. Military Commissions court for war crimes, at the U.S. Naval Base, in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Jan. 19, 2009. The federal government is planning to seek an emergency stay of an Alberta judge's decision to grant former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr bail, The Canadian Press has learned. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Janet Hamlin, PoolCanadian defendant Omar Khadr sits during a hearing at the U.S. Military Commissions court for war crimes, at the U.S. Naval Base, in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Jan. 19, 2009. The federal government is planning to seek an emergency stay of an Alberta judge's decision to grant former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr bail, The Canadian Press has learned. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Janet Hamlin, Pool

    Omar Khadr’s lawyer says the Canadian government – despite losing 10 straight court challenges – continues to pull out all the stops and spend millions of taxpayers’ dollars to keep his client in jail.

    Khadr, who was once held at Guantanamo Bay, is to be released on bail after a recent court ruling in Canada. That case is scheduled to be heard Tuesday in Edmonton.

    But lawyers for the federal government, which has stated in Parliament that it is opposed to his release, have scheduled a surprise hearing to try to derail the process, Khadr’s lawyer tells Yahoo Canada News.

    “We now have two hearings - first is the stay of proceedings and then in the afternoon we have an already scheduled hearing,” Khadr’s lawyer, Dennis Edney said in a telephone interview Monday.

    Calls for an explanation about the government’s stay application by Yahoo Canada Newshave not been returned.

    The federal government’s application is to be heard by Alberta’s Court of Appeal just hours before another court hearing

    Read More »from Taxpayers apathetic that Ottawa spending millions to fight Khadr case: lawyer
  • A silent upheaval is happening across schools in Canada and the US. On the surface, it appears to be about dress codes, but in reality it’s the first wave of a vocal uprising from students around puberty and sexualization in schools, according to one expert.

    In early April, a 15-word post went up on Tumblr with a picture that quickly went viral.

     

    the Tumblr post that went viral.the Tumblr post that went viral.

    Signs like this have been appearing in schools across North America for the last couple of years, but nobody is really talking about them. The issue, at first glance, is straightforward: dress codes that unfairly target girls.

    But the issue isn’t nearly that simple, says Dr. Gabrielle Morrissey, a human sexuality and relationships expert. The signs aren’t just a way to argue against dress codes; they’re an important first step for teens to proclaim that they want to lead the conversation on matters of sexuality, gender equality and self-esteem.

    “It's almost like an anonymous "take back the night" campaign,” Morrissey told Yahoo Canada.

    Read More »from The hidden dress code message in school hallways
  • 'Big shaggy dog' spotted on Fogo Island turns out to be polar bear'Big shaggy dog' spotted on Fogo Island turns out to be polar bear

    Without action to reduce human-caused climate change, as many as one in six species will be risk of extinction, says a new study.

    The risk of species loss will accelerate as global temperatures increase, says Mark Urban, the study author from the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Connecticut.

    The tropics of South America will be the epicentre of loss, says his analysis, published in the Science Magazine. Twenty-three per cent of species on that continent are in jeopardy of disappearing under the worst-case-scenario that greenhouse gas emissions continue uncurbed.

    Australia and New Zealand are next, each with 14 per cent of species in danger.

    “I found, as you might expect, that the extinction risks increase with the amount of temperature rise that the earth would experience,” Urban tells Yahoo Canada News.

    But while North America has the lowest predicted extinction risk as a continent – five per cent of species - Arctic Canada is at elevated risk, says

    Read More »from One in six species at risk under climate status quo: study
  • Report on sexual misconduct in Canadian Forces has military officials under fire

    Judge finds "an undeniable problem of sexual harassment and sexual assault"

    Top brass from the Canadian Armed Forces were on the defensive Thursday following the release of an external investigation that found a prevalence of under-reported sexual harassment and assault and a culture of “misogyny” in the military.

    “There is an undeniable problem of sexual harassment and sexual assault in the CAF, which requires direct and sustained action,” said the report by retired Supreme Court of Canada Justice Marie Deschamps.

    Another major problem was that military leaders didn’t know how bad the problem was in their ranks, the report suggests. One of the main reasons for that disconnect is the very structure of military and its methods of dealing with problems.

    “During the course of this Review, it became clear that one of the functions of the chain of command is to address problems before they reach the attention of senior leaders,” the report concluded.


    Related Stories:

    Military, judge agree on sexual misconduct problem, but not on how to solve it

    Jason Kenney

    Read More »from Report on sexual misconduct in Canadian Forces has military officials under fire
  • 2008 Bentley Arnage Concours Edition2008 Bentley Arnage Concours Edition

    In “The Red Green Show”, Steve Smith’s title character saved some of his more innovative (see: cockamamie) schemes for his ‘Possum Van’, which he would unceremoniously convert to a snowplow or air boat or something else, using a few dozen metres of duct tape and comedic lack of safety precaution.

    In real life, Smith indeed is a lifelong gear head, but these days his tastes run a bit finer than the junky grey 1985 Dodge van he abused on his show.

    The proof will be on display this weekend at the Toronto Classic Car Auction in Mississauga, where one of the gems of his collection will be auctioned, a limited edition 2008 Bentley Arnage Concours sedan.

    Now, to be clear, he’s not exactly sitting on a hangar-sized garage filled with vintage autos.

    “I’m not Jay Leno,” the 69-year-old quips in an interview from Florida, where he keeps most of his cars.

    Instead, Smith’s fascination with cars is a function of the same attributes he invested in the beloved Red Green character, a lifelong love of

    Read More »from Red Green actor Steve Smith to auction off rare Bentley
  • A man inspects the remains of what ISIS militants say was a U.S. drone in Raqqa Sept. 23, 2014. (Reuters)A man inspects the remains of what ISIS militants say was a U.S. drone in Raqqa Sept. 23, 2014. (Reuters)

    The United States’ controversial program of using drones to target terrorist groups overseas, especially their leaders, came into sharp focus again in recent days after President Barack Obama was forced to apologize for a drone strike in Pakistan that killed two foreign hostages held by al-Qaeda.

    U.S. policy-makers view drones as the best way to disrupt terror groups with minimal risk to American lives. The strategy has created a backlash over unintended civilian casualties and the legality of targeting American members of terror groups.

    Advocates claim it’s effective, making it harder for terrorists to operate in the open and putting a target on the back of anyone who aspires to the leadership.

    But what if the basic premise behind so-called “decapitation programs” (attacks that target the leaders of an organization) is wrong? What if drone attacks or other forms of targeted assassination using special operations hit teams leads to more terror attacks on civilians?

    Max Abrahms, a

    Read More »from 'Decapitation strikes' on terrorist groups may bolster attacks against civilians: study
  • Downtown Vancouver is pictured in 2009. (AFP Photo/Erica Berenstein)Downtown Vancouver is pictured in 2009. (AFP Photo/Erica Berenstein)

    Parents with two young children need to earn $20.68 an hour, working full-time, in order to make ends meet in Metro Vancouver, says a new report.

    That’s more than double British Columbia’s $10.25 minimum wage.

    “The goal is, if you work hard, if you work full-time, you should be able to have a life and you should not be scrambling to make ends meet and wondering how you’re going to put food on the table,” says Iglika Ivanova, a senior economist and co-author of the report for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

    A two-parent family with a four-year-old and a seven-year old child together need to earn $75,276 a year to pay for life’s basics, she tells Yahoo Canada News.

    That includes $1,573 a month for renting a three-bedroom apartment, utilities, telephone and contents insurance.

    The second-largest expense is child care, at $1,324 a month for a four-year-old in full-time care and a seven-year-old in care before and after school.

    The family pays $517 monthly for transportation,

    Read More »from Living wage in Metro Vancouver more than double province’s minimum wage: report

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