• An actress performs during the 15 22 performance opposing violence against women in front of Chigi palace in Rome September 25, 2013. Italy's government imposed stricter measures in August to combat violence against women. No official statistics exist on the number of murders of women in Italy, but Telefono Rosa (15 22), a domestic violence support group, said that last year 124 women were killed by men because of their gender, most by current or former partners. REUTERS/Remo Casilli (ITALY - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW)An actress performs during the 15 22 performance opposing violence against women in front of Chigi palace in Rome September 25, 2013. Italy's government imposed stricter measures in August to combat violence against women. No official statistics exist on the number of murders of women in Italy, but Telefono Rosa (15 22), a domestic violence support group, said that last year 124 women were killed by men because of their gender, most by current or former partners. REUTERS/Remo Casilli (ITALY - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW)
    A study of more than a thousand mothers over a decade found that the women who suffered spousal abuse were twice as likely to develop depression and three times as likely to develop psychotic symptoms of mental illness as those where weren’t the victims of domestic violence.

    The joint study the University of Montreal and King’s College in the United Kingdom found four in 10 women were victims of domestic violence in that time.

    “In addition to the experience of physical injury, there is an increased risk for those women to experience mental illness,” Isabelle Ouellet-Morin, author of the study and a researcher at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal, tells Yahoo Canada News.

    The results are not surprising, says Ouellet-Morin.

    But while there has long been evidence that domestic violence increases the risk of depression and mental illness in women, she says this study pinpoints that link.

    The team has been tracking the mothers of twins in the United Kingdom for more

    Read More »from Women who suffer spousal abuse more likely to develop depression, mental illness: study
  • (via Entrepreneur)(via Entrepreneur)

    It’s funny how inured we’ve become to spam, the bane of our digital lives, in less than a generation.

    We’ve learned to be on guard not just for the equivalent of the junk that clogs our front-door snail-mailbox but also for cunningly disguised malware, akin to getting a envelope full of anthrax through the mail slot each day.

    It’s taken almost a decade for government to implement legislation designed to reduce it at least a little, but even the enforcers say it’s still up to us to police our own computers, smartphones and other vulnerable devices.

    Canadian anti-spam legislation (CASL) came into effect last July, two years after it passed Parliament, which was preceded by nine years of work. The two-year gap gave the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) time to prepare for its new role as an Internet cop and for businesses using the web to figure out how to comply.

    So far the CRTC has concluded only two investigations, both announced in March. Compu-Finder

    Read More »from Canadian anti-spam legislation off to slow start, but seeing results
  • Canada's Information Commissioner Suzanne Legault shuffles papers during a news conference upon the release of her report in Ottawa March 31, 2015. REUTERS/Chris WattieCanada's Information Commissioner Suzanne Legault shuffles papers during a news conference upon the release of her report in Ottawa March 31, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
    Canada’s information watchdog is recommending sweeping changes to federal access to information law, including bringing the Prime Minister’s Office and his cabinet under its scope.

    In a report tabled Tuesday, Information Commissioner Suzanne Legault makes 85 recommendations to update the legislation that enshrines the public’s right to government information.

    “In the 30-plus year history of the Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada, my predecessors and I have documented multiple challenges and deficiencies with the act,” Legault says in the report.

    “The act is applied to encourage a culture of delay. The act is applied to deny disclosure. It acts as a shield against transparency. The interests of the government trump the interests of the public.”

    She recommends eliminating all fees for access to information requests. Currently, while the application fee to make a request is only $5, additional fees can be charged for search time and reproducing records.

    Her own

    Read More »from Federal info watchdog recommends sweeping change to Access to Information
  • An Air Canada passenger jet that crashed is shown at the Stanfield International Airport in Halifax. (CP)An Air Canada passenger jet that crashed is shown at the Stanfield International Airport in Halifax. (CP)

    There’s an age-old adage in aviation law, “res ipsa loquitur:” Latin for “the thing speaks for itself.”

    “What it means is, if you’re going to take people who are perfectly safe on the ground and lift them up into the air then you’ve got to put them back on the face of the earth safe and sound and if you don’t you’re (liable),” says J.J. Camp, a partner at Camp Fiorante Matthews Mogerman law firm in Vancouver. “Aviation law is not simple but that principal is very, very well embedded.”

    As for what exactly is owed in the event of an airline accident, like the one in Halifax this past weekend, that’s much less well-established.

    Air Canada Flight 624’s crash Halifax on Sunday morning, no doubt a particularly traumatic experience for passengers involved in light of the Germanwings crash, brings up that very question of what passengers are now owed in light of the incident.

    What we know so far is this: Flight 624 touched down about 335 metres short of the runway, hit an antenna array,

    Read More »from Biggest thing Halifax Air Canada crash passengers are 'owed' is an apology: PR expert
  • A photograph of Terrie Ann Dauphinais is seen as participants hug after singing a song during the "24 Hour Sacred Gathering of Drums" protest calling for an inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women, on Parliament Hill in Ottawa May 12, 2014. Dauphinais was found murdered in her Calgary home on April 29, 2002 and the case remains unsolved. REUTERS/Chris Wattie (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)A photograph of Terrie Ann Dauphinais is seen as participants hug after singing a song during the "24 Hour Sacred Gathering of Drums" protest calling for an inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women, on Parliament Hill in Ottawa May 12, 2014. Dauphinais was found murdered in her Calgary home on April 29, 2002 and the case remains unsolved. REUTERS/Chris Wattie (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)


    **Editor’s note: This article contains graphic descriptions that may be upsetting to some readers.

    Cindy Gladue bled to death in a motel bathroom from an 11-centimetre wound in the wall of her vagina.

    On March 18th, Brad Barton, the man who was in that motel room with her the night she died, was acquitted of murder and manslaughter.

    Barton, a 46-year-old long-haul trucker from Ontario, admitted in court that he was with Gladue that night. He testified that if he caused the injury it was inadvertent, likely the result of rough sex. He fell asleep and woke the next morning to find her dead, the jury heard.

    The verdict outraged Gladue’s family and their supporters, who see it as another low point in the ongoing crisis of missing and murdered First Nations women in Canada.

    This Thursday, rallies are planned in 14 cities from St. John’s, NL, to Victoria, B.C., to demand an appeal and retrial.

    “Cindy’s family, they were so, so hurt by this and in so much pain,” Fawn Marie Lamouche, who was

    Read More »from Cindy Gladue-inspired rallies to demand appeal of not guilty murder verdict
  • Saanich Mayor Richard Atwell talks to media outside the legislature in Victoria, Monday, March 30, 2015. British Columbia's privacy commissioner says a Vancouver Island municipality violated privacy rights by secretly installing computer spyware the mayor alleged was used to bug his computer. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dirk MeissnerSaanich Mayor Richard Atwell talks to media outside the legislature in Victoria, Monday, March 30, 2015. British Columbia's privacy commissioner says a Vancouver Island municipality violated privacy rights by secretly installing computer spyware the mayor alleged was used to bug his computer. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dirk Meissner
    It seems a plot line worthy of House of Cards.

    The newly elected mayor of the small Vancouver Islanddistrict of Saanich decamped from city hall earlier this year, alleging spyingat the municipal headquarters.

    Mayor Richard Atwell said in January that his city hall computer was bugged and set up a private email account for constituents to contact him.

    To some it seemed, to say the least, unlikely in the sleepy suburb of Victoria, known more for its coastal parks than its political hijinks.

    But B.C.’s privacy commissioner now says it’s true, the district had installed invasive surveillance programs on city hall computers that violated the privacy rights of employees.

    “The software had been configured to record the activities of district employees, including recording and retaining screenshots of computer activity at 30 second intervals and every keystroke taken on a workstation’s keyboard, and retaining copies of every email sent or received,” says the report released Monday by the

    Read More »from B.C. privacy czar's report vindicates Saanich city hall spyware accusations
  • Photo: The Canadian PressPhoto: The Canadian Press
    Estimates vary, but as few as one in three young voters bothers to go down to the polling station on election day.

    The abysmal turnout among Millennials in the last two federal elections has been singled out to Elections Canada as one of the main culprits in the overall demise in voting numbers.

    But the problem is not that young voters are any less civically engaged or politically aware than their older compatriots.

    There is a generational divide between Canadians under age 35 and those over, says the study released Friday by the Broadbent Institute.

    “When we ask why they don’t vote, a lot of them say the biggest reason is not because they don’t know about politics,” David McGrane, a professor of political science at the University of Saskatchewan and author of the report, tells Yahoo Canada News.

    “They know every bit as much as older Canadians. They know where to vote; they know how to vote.”

    But young voters across the country tend to lean to the left of the political spectrum, says

    Read More »from Youth not voting because majority lean far left politically, says study
  • Thu, Mar 26: On this edition of the News Hour Plus, the Global BC anchors discuss how to deal with hecklers and haters after meteorologist Kristi Gordon received a hurtful letter from an unhappy viewer about her pregnancy wardrobe.Thu, Mar 26: On this edition of the News Hour Plus, the Global BC anchors discuss how to deal with hecklers and haters after meteorologist Kristi Gordon received a hurtful letter from an unhappy viewer about her pregnancy wardrobe.
    Sometimes, people suck. That’s not news.

    But a British Columbia meteorologist has sparked a revolt against the haters by speaking out on Global BC’s newscast about rude emails she’s received as she continues her full-time job on-air through her second pregnancy.

    Kristi Gordon is six months pregnant. She has a three-year-old at home. She works full-time.

    Contrary to popular belief, she has no makeup person, stylist or personal shopper.

    As any TV personality can attest, a small number of critical emails, calls and letters come from members of the public. But a handwritten letter sent this week prompted Gordon to address the issue on-air.

    “It was so hateful,” Gordon tells Yahoo Canada News.

    At the outset of her second pregnancy, the meteorologist appealed to viewers to “be nice.” She’d been through on-air changes in her appearance before.

    Some sad, angry people struggle with nice.

    The letter, sent to “Globel,” called the mom-to-be “gross” and said the viewers had changed the channel.

    Read More »from Pregnant B.C. TV meteorologist  calls out the bullies for fat shaming
  • Kurdish peshmerga forces carry their weapons at outskirts of Kirkuk March 15, 2015. (Reuters)Kurdish peshmerga forces carry their weapons at outskirts of Kirkuk March 15, 2015. (Reuters)
    It’s a foregone conclusion Prime Minister Harper will win next week’s Commons vote to expand Canada’s military mission against Islamic State.
    Harper's plan is for the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) to attack ISIS targets inside neighbouring Syria. 
    Critics of the mission say besides being an illegal intrusion into a sovereign state, CF-18 air strikes increase the potential risk to pilots. Unlike Iraq, where allies are close at hand to help a downed pilot, Syria is entirely hostile territory.

    Last December, a Jordanian pilot whose aircraft went down in ISIS-held territory was captured and executed, but not before ISIS extracted maximum propaganda value from the incident.

    As of yet, there have been no Canadians captured by ISIS, despite the military missions in the region and Canadians choosing to join Kurdish forces independently. But after seeing what has happened to other foreign nationals, Canadians can’t help but wonderwhat would happen if it were one of their own citizens

    Read More »from ISIS mission in Syria: What happens if a Canadian gets captured?
  • Canada behind in bringing e-health online: report

    Carestream's new Clinical Collaboration Platform can boost collaboration around clinical data; break down walls between ancillary departments, sites and networks; and provide physicians with a single view of critical patient records and information. (Photo: Business Wire) <a href=http://www.businesswire.com/cgi-bin/mmg.cgi?eid=50993146&lang=en> Multimedia Gallery URL</a>
    Canada has spent more than $10 billion developing electronic health records but continues to lag behind other countries in sharing information among healthcare providers and organizations, says a new report.

    Less than 30 per cent of primary care doctors have electronic access to clinical data about a patient who has been seen by a different health organization, says the report from the C.D. Howe Institute.

    “We’ve made a tremendous amount of progress in the last two or three years but we’re still behind,” Dennis Protti, co-author of the report and professor emeritus at the School of Health Information Science at the University of Victoria, tells Yahoo Canada News.

    “There are parts of the world where every GP, regardless of where they’re practising or how they’re practising, uses technology and communicates electronically with hospitals and specialists… We’re not there yet.”

    Some surveys have found that in primary care only 12 per cent of physicians are notified electronically of

    Read More »from Canada behind in bringing e-health online: report

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