Jun Lin’s parents share their pain and disillusionment in first interview since their son’s murder

It was a parent's worst nightmare, played out in public.

It's easy to get caught up in the gruesome details, Magnotta's villain-like persona, the porn-star connection and the international manhunt. But what about the victim's family?

Zhigui Du and Diran Lin, Jun Lin's mother and father, recently gave their first interview since their son's gruesome murder, sharing both their pain and disillusionment with the country they believed was "a peaceful place with great respect for multiculturalism."

Jun Lin's parentsJun Lin's parents talk to CBC News about the agony of losing their son

"We still believe that most people here are very kind, but this heinous crime happened in Canada. It's made me reconsider what kind of place this is," Zhigui Du told the CBC's Mark Kelley in an interview for The National on Monday.

[ Related: Timeline of events ]

One month ago, Jun Lin's parents wrote an open letter to Concordia University, where their son, whom they called their "pride and hope," studied.

"This tragic loss is not only a devastating attack to our family, but also has had a tremendous impact on the whole society," they wrote. "Love and trust must be rebuilt."

The new interview is a serious reminder that, despite an outpouring of support from the government and Montreal residents, their pain has not lessened.

Not only did this heinous crime occur on Canadian soil, it was posted online — something that has "only heightened their anguish," CBC News reports.

"What a disaster and huge pain for our family," Du sobbed.

"The most unbearable pain for me is that the video got posted on the internet. People watched it over and over. It's like my son is being murdered again and again."

Perhaps the saddest thing about the interview: Jun Lin's mother learned of his death in a television news report. She said she fainted at the news.

Jun Lin's parents are currently trying to decide where to bury their son's remains: in Montreal, the city he loved, or in China, where tradition dictates that "fallen leaves must go back to the root of the tree."

Magnotta's trial-by-jury will begin in March 2013.

[ Related: Teacher fired for showing alleged Magnotta video to students ]