• On Saturday afternoon, Joseph "Jo Jo" McCray, 6, went missing while on a hunting excursion with his family in a wooded area in Sunderland, Vermont.

    More than 120 first responders and volunteers joined the search for the young boy, who was found early the next morning more than a mile from where he was last spotted.

    "The boy did talk when we found him. He was very cold, his feet were wet, and he had a good amount of clothing on — camouflage overalls, long johns, heavy wool coat and a hat. He was dressed for the elements," Arlington Fire Chief James Paustian told the Times Argus.

    Joseph disappeared after he was told to spread out in the woods as part of a family deer drive, WCAX reported. He failed to reunite with his dad and siblings at their rendezvous point. After retracing their steps, the frantic family reported the boy missing.

    Joseph was found near the Glastenbury Mountain summit, quite the trek for a youngster of that size, Paustian said:

    "The terrain is vertical with a lot of

    Read More »from Vermont boy, 6, found safe after spending night in freezing woods
  • Goodbye, Cyber Monday — hello, Giving Tuesday

    Move over, Cyber Monday. Today is Giving Tuesday, the official jumpstart to the holiday giving season.

    "It's a simple idea. Find a way for your family, your community, your company or your organization to join in acts of giving. Tell everyone you can about what you are doing and why it matters. Join a national celebration of our great tradition of generosity," promotes GivingTuesday.org.

    Instead of encouraging excitement for buying, supporters of the first-ever Giving Tuesday want to see citizens get excited about charitable donations. And while it follows the American Thanksgiving-generated Black Friday and Cyber Monday, Giving Tuesday aims to become a worldwide phenomenon.

    "We wanted to create a day that was good for the soul," Beverly Greenfield, a spokesperson for the 92 St Y, a non-profit cultural and community group in New York, which helped create the project, told the Guardian.

    "We are encouraging people to give something," she continued. "We are trying to create a community

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  • $300k in gold dust found during California home renovation

    Workers installing an expensive heating and air system in a old Sacramento, California, home discovered a secret gold dust stash hidden beneath the floor grill.

    The honest men turned in their discovery to the surprised homeowners.

    Experts estimate that the gold dust, stored in 12 baby food jars, is worth $300,000.

    The pricey HVAC installation cost around $6,500.

    "I still can't believe it today," Steve Ottley of Clark & Rush, the HVAC installation company, told CBS Sacramento. "It's unreal. We kind of just looked at each other and said 'wow.'"

    The homeowners, who requested anonymity in the press, don't know the origin of the gold dust, but are " handling their new gold just fine," CBS reports.

    "Every time we find this type of thing, we are always trustworthy and upfront," said Mark Thyne of Clark & Rush, adding that while he can guarantee integrity and great customer service, he can't guarantee finding buried treasure with each installation.

    The company did, however, find around $25,000

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  • This undated photo, shows a postcard delivered to an address in Elmira N.Y., during the week of Nov. 12. 2012.The postcard was originally sent nearly seven decades ago. (AP Photo/The Star-Gazette, Jennifer Kingsley)
    On July 4, 1943, a postcard was send to sisters Pauline and Theresa Leisenring of Elmira, New York.

    Last week, it finally made its destination, arriving at the home now owned by Adam and Laura Rundell.

    "It was delivered in mint condition. We were so shocked," Laura told the Star-Gazette. "It's a treasure that just showed up in the mailbox with our address on it."

    The letter was sent by the sisters' parents, who were visiting their brother at the Medical Center Barracks at Camp Grant, a WWII Army post.

    The postcard reads:

    "Dear Pauline and Theresa, We arrived safe, had a good trip, but we were good and tired. Geo. looks good, we all went out to dinner today (Sunday). Now we are in the park. Geo has to go back to Grant at 12 o'clock tonight. Do not see much of him. We are going to make pancakes for Geo for supper tonight. See you soon. Love Mother, Dad."

    Adam told the paper that he and his wife tracked down the Leisenring sisters' remaining relatives — Theresa died in 1952, Pauline in

    Read More »from World War II-era postcard finally delivered in Elmira, New York
  • Boy’s best friend: Dog saves 10-year-old from speeding truck

    Geo, a German Shepherd-Collie cross, is expected to make a full recovery after suffering a fractured spine, broken leg and severe bruising during a heroic rescue in Essex, U.K.

    The 7-month-old pup pushed his owner, 10-year-old Charlie Riley, out of the way of a speeding truck headed straight for them. Instead of hitting the boy, the reckless driver mounted the curb and hit Geo instead.

    Watch ITV's news coverage of Geo's heroism here.

    Charlie's mother, Carly, and his two brothers witnessed the terrifying hit-and-run:

    "We were waiting to cross the road, when I just heard a car going really fast," she told the Sun.

    "Then a pick-up truck mounted the kerb, and the next thing I know is Geo has pushed Charlie out the way. Geo took the full force — then the truck hit him again and just drove off. I have no doubt Geo saved Charlie."

    "It could have wiped us all out. If it wasn't for Geo I am 100 per cent sure it would've been Charlie," she added.

    Geo's vet bills are expected to top £8,000

    Read More »from Boy’s best friend: Dog saves 10-year-old from speeding truck
  • After overhearing a child ask his mother how they were going to afford to pay for their holiday meal, Ricky Craig, owner of Houston, Texas' Hubcap Grill, decided to help the family out — then followed up his generous move by offering to give each of his Twitter followers $100 for Thanksgiving food.

    His tweet went viral.

    "It just went crazy viral worldwide. I had people from the United Kingdom, Australia, trying to contact me online," Craig told the Daily Dot. "I was trying to help my community. It was a last minute decision and when I tweeted it out I didn't think it was going to be that crazy."

    A video or other embedded content has been hidden. Click here to view it.

    His tweet was retweeted more than 400 times. Dozens of phone calls and emails flooded his restaurant.

    "When you get emails from people calling out your name, saying, 'Ricky, Ricky, Ricky, please help me, I have nothing,' it made me feel sick to my stomach," Craig said. "My heart just went out to them. I couldn't help all these people out. I didn't realize how bad people's situation are. It

    Read More »from Texas restaurant owner donates Thanksgiving meals to Twitter followers
  • Ron Cook, a drag racer from Monroe, Washington, sold his car to help a baby he's never met.

    Casen Buswell, 9 months old, was born with a rare vascular condition called Glomuvenous Malformations Plaque Type, which hardens his blood vessels, skin and muscle. If untreated, it could lead to heart failure.

    Because of the rarity of the condition — little Casen is one of only 14 people in the world with it — the only treatment currently available is in Belgium. His family anticipates the frequent trips overseas to cost thousands of dollars.

    "I think life throws a lot of curveballs, and this is definitely one of them," said Jenna Buswell, Casen's mother.

    [ More good news: Restaurant owner donates Thanksgiving meals to Twitter followers ]

    When Cook heard Casen's story, he felt compelled to act. He decided to sell his 1957 Chevy Bel-Air, which he hoped would bring in at least $10,000, and donate the money to the Buswell family.

    In the end, he raffled off the classic car for $11,000.

    The winner

    Read More »from Drag racer Ron Cook sells classic car to help baby with rare disease
  • Talk about customer service!

    When a computer crash halted checkout lines at a Harris Teeter grocery store in Morrocroft Village, North Carolina, on Sunday, store employees served up samples of turkey and ham subs, sushi rolls and pimento cheese crackers to those stuck in line.

    And then, because of the hour-and-half wait, the store gave the customers their groceries for free.

    "I think Harris Teeter handled it really well. They showed how much they cared about their customers and even the customers were — for the most part — taking it in stride," Dave Coburn, one of the customers stuck in line, told the Charlotte Observer. The satisfied customer estimated the value of his groceries to be about $110 that day.

    "Rather than inconveniencing our customers, we did allow complimentary groceries to approximately 60 (to) 70 customers who were in the store trying to check out," Harris Teeter spokeswoman Danna Jones wrote in an email to the paper.

    The glitch was repaired and business continued as

    Read More »from Computer glitch prompts supermarket to give customers free groceries
  • Sia Ka Tian, 70, made international headlines this week for returning the cash left in the back of his taxi.

    The Singapore cabbie noticed a black paper bag left in the back of his vehicle after he dropped off a vacationing Thai couple at a mall.

    Inside the bag: a whopping 1.1 million Singaporean dollars — about $900,000.

    "When I saw the money, I thought, trouble is here. I was sure there was at least $200,000 in the bag,'' the 31-year veteran in the taxi business told the Straits Times of Singapore.

    Tian immediately took the cash to the lost-and-found office at ComfortDelGro taxi firm. Soon after, the couple contacted the cab company.

    The overjoyed couple gave Tian an undisclosed "handsome reward." He was also honoured with an award for good service from his cab company, AFP reports.

    "The money is unimportant to me. It doesn't belong to me, so how can I use it?'" Tian told the newspaper of his decision to turn in the cash.

    "Finding one million dollars in cash is not an everyday affair

    Read More »from Honest Singapore cabbie returns almost $1 million in cash
  • Hospital cafeteria food doesn't exactly have a delicious reputation. But in Churchill, Manitoba, where the cost of groceries has skyrocket in recent months — a four-litre jug of milk currently costs almost $12 — residents flock to their local hospital for meals that won't break the bank.

    Fortunately, the Churchill hospital's food doesn't taste half bad either:

    "The food is really good here," a hospital receptionist told the National Post, adding that for $6.50, diners could buy a meal of baked chicken, wild rice, harvest vegetable soup and a salad.

    "There is no other place like it. It is the best deal in town. And don't even get me started with the Northern Store [the local grocery store], where a five-pound bag of potatoes costs, what, eight bucks?"

    The hospital is the town's dining hot spot, stealing clientele from other eateries because of its unbeatable prices — and its healthy, hearty menu.

    Even the owner of a local bakery can't complain:

    "We've got it all here," Tony Da Silva

    Read More »from Northern Manitoba town flocks to local hospital — for the food

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