• Like many others, I'm one of the lucky ones who gets to look doubly-ridiculous when I see a 3D movie: to watch, I have to wear the theatre's 3D glasses over my prescription lenses. But designers Lucy Jung and Daejin Ahn clearly feel the pain of their bespectacled friends and have come up with an innovative solution.

    STIX are sticker lenses that you can attach to eyeglasses and turn them into 3D glasses. The stickers are polarized filters that peel off and stick to the lens. TechCrunch reports the stickers are actually made from the same material as mobile screen protectors, so as not to damage the glass and pull away cleanly when they're removed.

    Jung says on Yanko Design that she was inspired to make them because she, too, wears glasses, and had to put in her contacts every time she wanted to watch a movie in 3D.

    The STIX project is still in the conceptual stage, so you can't run out and pick up your pair just yet, but the idea is so practical, I'm hopeful that I won't be stuck in two

    Read More »from Peel-and-stick polarized lenses turn any eyewear into 3D glasses
  • One of America's top-selling streaming platforms has come to Canada, with plenty of content available to keep media junkies satisfied right from the start.

    Roku, a set-top streaming player, officially launches in Canada today and is available to pre-order for April 30. Canada is the latest country in Roku's plans of global domination, which began with sales in the U.K. starting earlier this year.

    Canadians have the choice between Roku's two highest-end devices, the Roku 2 XD and the Roku 2 XS. Both give access to 100 entertainment channels at launch, the Financial Post reports, with the intention to increase the number of channels over time, like they have in the U.S. Currently, Roku users in the U.S have access to more than 450 channels of content.

    Channels include content like movies and TV shows from Netflix and Crackle, sports content from the National Hockey League and Major League Baseball, music from Rdio and TuneIn Radio, photos and video from Facebook and Flickr, news content

    Read More »from Roku Canada launches streaming player, bringing popular U.S. platform north of border
  • Anyone who has ever had trouble getting up in the morning knows how difficult it is to find an alarm clock that will get the job done. Sometimes, waking up to a minorly-irritating buzzing with the option to hit 'snooze' just doesn't cut it.

    If you're one of those people, a New Jersey inventor thinks he's come up with a solution.

    Paul Sammut, a 25-year-old engineer in New Jersey, has put together this short film on his creation, the world's 'worst' alarm clock called the Ramos. To turn it off, you need to get out of bed and key in a code on the panel, installed in another room:

    Sammut says that he uses the clock every day and it's the only thing he's found that can replace the effectiveness of his mother who used to wake him up in high school.

    "Now I wake up before it goes off," said Sammut in a Daily Mail article. "I subconsciously fear it and know I have to get up."

    Sammut says that since posting about his invention on Kickstarter nearly two months ago, he's raised over $150,000

    Read More »from Ramos, the world’s most annoying alarm clock, given a run for its money
  • Inside a Foxconn factory, file photo. REUTERS/Bobby Yip/FilesThe electronics manufacturing company known as Foxconn has — for all the wrong reasons — become quite the hot button topic as of late.

    Its production of industry-leading gadgets such as the iPad has taken a back seat to reports of employee abuse and poor working conditions.

    "It was shocking to hear that the device associated with (re)birthing an entire market segment, one that's so close to perfection, was created in such dire circumstances," shares Damien Scott on Complex.com. "The whole ordeal left us wanting to check out the work floor with our own eyes. Now, thanks to American Public Media's Marketplace.org, we can."

    Rob Scmitz, Marketplace Shanghai Bureau Chief, became only the second reporter to gain access to the factory floor at Foxconn, documenting the production of the iPad with his accompanying video crew.

    "You'll see workers putting the motherboard together, installing and then testing the display, and some other tasks," highlights Scott. "Watching the video, it's easy to

    Read More »from Video from Foxconn shows the making of the iPad
  • The Macintosh 128K, the first in a long line of Macintosh computers, had originally come with a price tag of U.S.$2,495 when it hit the market back in 1984.

    A prototype of the very same computer is now for sale on eBay, but this nostalgic trip down memory lane is currently priced at U.S. $99,995, approximately 40 times the computer's original cost.

    The archaic computer features a 9 inch (23 cm) monitor, a keyboard and a mouse. But what makes this specific prototype unique is the 5.25-inch "Twiggy" drive, a proprietary feature considered a rarity when the Macintosh 128K was created 28 years ago.

    "For a period in the Mac's development, it was assumed that the computer would feature Apple's proprietary Twiggy 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, which also came as standard issue on the original Lisa," explains Zachary Lutz in an Endgadget piece. "Just recently, an extremely rare prototype of the 128k Mac with a Twiggy drive has surfaced on eBay."

    The Twiggy drive boasted the ability to store 860

    Read More »from Original Apple Macintosh 128K prototype for sale on eBay for $99K
  • Barnes and Noble has debuted its latest version of the Nook, and while it certainly is a bright spot in the world of e-readers, it isn't the only thing changing for e-books.

    With the popularity of e-books rising dramatically in recent years, both publishers and e-reader manufacturers are looking for ways to improve the e-reading experience. Take a look at this new Nook, which has a glowing backlit screen:

    A video or other embedded content has been hidden. Click here to view it.

    It's a good thing that e-reader companies are striving to innovate, however, because they're gaining some major competition from tablets. A quick look at the sales numbers from the last few months speaks volumes about the growing gap between tablets and e-readers. Amazon reports that it had a very good December, selling over four million Kindle e-readers that month, a TechCrunch article says. However tablet sales continue to surge forward at an exponential pace; in just the first three days of the new iPad's release, Apple reports that it sold three million units, and over 15 million

    Read More »from New e-reader that adjusts to light just one way the world of e-books is evolving
  • It's being described as "the world's largest dream experiment": an iPhone app that can reportedly control a user's dreams.

    British psychologist Richard Wiseman — who claims to have the most followers of any psychologist on Twitter — has teamed up with software developers from YUZA to create Dream:ON, a free download said to influence your dreams through the use of soundscapes.

    "Owners of iPhones who download the app will turn their phones into a 'dream factory' able to play a customized 'soundscape' designed to influence the mind into dreaming about pleasant scenes, such as lying on a beach," reports Fox News.

    Wiseman provides a quick tutorial in the video below:

    As Wiseman demonstrates, the process begins by selecting the "start dreaming" button, indicating the time you'd like to wake up, selecting an alarm tone and choosing your desired soundscape. You then rest the iPhone face down on the nightstand and "throughout the night, the app will monitor and log your movements. And then,

    Read More »from Dream:On iPhone app said to manipulate your dreams
  • With popular game titles such as Gears of War and Batman: Arkham City, the Unreal Engine platform is widely known for its realistic gaming experience.

    Divisions of the U.S. government have taken notice but killing subterranean creatures and beating up the Joker's thugs are hardly skills that apply to the real world.

    With the help of Virtual Heroes, a teaching software developer, the Unreal platform will soon provide a more practical learning experience, one that will assist in the training of U.S. army medics and FBI agents.

    "By using Epic's Unreal Engine 3, some United States government agencies like the FBI and U.S. Army are hoping to give their employees tools for virtually practicing their skills in a more realistic environment and better prepare them to save lives," reveals Jonathan Fincher in a Gizmag piece.

    "With the new agreement, Epic Games (creator of the Unreal platform) and Virtual Heroes, a division of Applied Research Associates, Inc., are establishing the Unreal

    Read More »from Unreal gaming engine licenced to train FBI, U.S. army medics
  • Twitter has taken aim at five of its most troublesome spam enablers with a lawsuit filed in federal court, the company's latest effort to crack down on mass-produced junk tweets.

    Defendants listed in the lawsuit, filed last Thursday, include Philippines-based JL4 Web Solutions (referred to in the suit as "TweetAttacks") and Tennessee-based Skootle Corporation (referred to as "TweetBuddy"; "TweetAdder"), as well as individuals Garland Harris and James Lucero.

    Twitter claims to have spent as much as $700,000 fighting spam produced by the five parties listed in the lawsuit.

    "With this suit, we're going straight to the source," Twitter shared in a recent blog post. "By shutting down tool providers, we will prevent other spammers from having these services at their disposal. Further, we hope the suit acts as a deterrent to other spammers, demonstrating the strength of our commitment to keep them off Twitter."

    No more than a day after the suit was filed in San Francisco, several of the

    Read More »from Twitter launches spam crackdown with federal lawsuit
  • While the cost of using a pay phone is going up in Canada, some of our neighbours to the south are looking for ways to replace them altogether.

    New York City is rolling out 32-inch "smart screens" for 250 phone booths in the city, Fox News reports. These touchscreens will replace the pay phones with a digital display of information on the neighbourhood like local restaurants, stores, landmarks and traffic information. Users can also press an on-screen button to contact 311, which will let them file complaints or get city information online.

    Eventually, the screens will be equipped so New Yorkers can make Skype calls, check email and surf via WiFi, although the web capabilities of the screens will be highly controlled (hopefully, they'll be better protected than these digital bus ads in Toronto).

    Unlike the increasingly-costly Canadian pay phones, it will be free to use these smart screens. The cost of the service will be covered by ad revenue. After the pilot program, New York City

    Read More »from New York City testing out high-tech phone booths featuring touchscreens, no phones

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