Break-ins, smashed windows cost businesses in St. Lawrence Market area thousands of dollars

·2 min read
A spokesperson with Toronto police says they have received reports relating to break and enter as well as damage to buildings in the St. Lawrence Market area. (St. Lawrence Neighbourhood Facebook Group - image credit)
A spokesperson with Toronto police says they have received reports relating to break and enter as well as damage to buildings in the St. Lawrence Market area. (St. Lawrence Neighbourhood Facebook Group - image credit)

Break-ins and smashed storefront windows in the St. Lawrence Market area are costing local businesses thousands of dollars, according to owners and residents of the area.

They are calling for a greater police presence in the area, especially at night, to help deter or catch the vandals.

"Every night, for weeks now, some condo or small business has their windows or doors smashed — sometimes more than one per night — and some businesses have been hit two or three times," area resident Chris Conrad told CBC News.

"Dozens of store and condo windows have been hit," she said.

A spokesperson with Toronto police confirmed to CBC News that they have received reports about breaking and entering as well as damage to buildings in the area.

In the past week alone, residents say there have been at least 14 reports of break-ins or businesses with damaged windows, including:

  • Big Pita and 115 Front St E.

  • Tacorrita at 263 King St E.

  • Urban Cova at 16 Church St.

  • Bindia Indian Bistro at 16 Market St.

  • Shoppers Drug Mart at 18 Lower Jarvis St.

  • Rexall at 63 Front St E.

  • Gateway Newstands at 1 The Esplanade.

  • ASK Computers at 111 Front St E.

  • Karmas Kitchen at 140 The Esplanade

  • Khao Hakka at 37 Sherbourne St.

'An act of mischief'

Karma Tsetar, who opened a restaurant in the area last October, says when his employees turned up for work last Friday they found one of the windows had been broken.

"It's a thick window and it doesn't seem like it was an accident, it was done purposely," he told CBC News.

"Someone had to use quite a force to break that window ... So, I was concerned about it," Tsetar said.

"The main concern that I have is I'm right opposite to a Catholic school ... a lot of kids. So, I'm concerned for the neighbourhood." .

CBC
CBC

Tsetar says while nothing was stolen, the cost to repair the broken window will affect his bottom line.

"This was an act of mischief," he said, adding that he reported it to police.

Nadia Kaakati, who lives in the area, says she has noticed a sudden spike in break-ins and smashed windows at local businesses.

"It's definitely a little unsettling but I'm more concerned for the businesses because I know it's expensive to replace those," she told CBC News.

CBC
CBC

Another resident, Shane McPherson, says seeing what's happening has left him "very unhappy" and "somewhat frustrated."

"It seems as though it could be one person or a couple of people just walking through the neighbourhood, just smashing random windows."

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