Brighton budget bylaw before council March 1

·2 min read

From road repairs to water services upgrades, Brighton’s finance director is sharing an overview of what adds up to a proposed $35-million budget for the municipality for 2021.

Following several rounds of discussion since October 2020 between staff and Brighton’s committee of the whole members, the budget bylaw is slated to be before council at the March 1 council meeting.

What’s proposed is a total of $35,017,626 in expenditures and a tax levy of $9,831,740. Currently, the municipal portion of the residential tax increase is 2.27 per cent.

Linda Widdifield, Brighton’s director of finance and administrative services, made a public presentation of the proposed budget during a recent council meeting, touching on the highlights of the budget and the impact on taxpayers.

“If your property was assessed at $400,000 in 2020, assessments didn’t change so it will still be assessed at $400,000 in 2021,” Widdifield said.

With an average tax bill of about $5,000 on a property assessed at $400,000, Widdifield provided a breakdown of where the money goes from county services to local services such as roads and winter maintenance, libraries, fire and protective services and parks and recreation.

Taxpayers in Brighton pay three levies on their property taxes – a municipal levy, a county levy and an education levy. The blended tax rate would be 1.67 per cent if Brighton’s budget passes.

Projects in Brighton’s proposed budget include filling staff vacancies, constructing pickleball courts, reconstructing and resurfacing several roads, storm water masterplan initiatives, completion of the new skateboard park and finishing servicing to the industrial park.

A water pumping station upgrade, forcemain replacement and sewage treatment project are also costs associated with the 2021 budget.

The finance director’s presentation is available for viewing on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WgykLPQ0LgU

The March 1 council meeting is at 6:30 p.m. and will be live-streamed on YouTube.

Natalie Hamilton, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter, Northumberland News