Bylaw restricting e-devices needs updating, says former Regina city councillor

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Joel Murray, a former Regina city councillor, disagrees with the restrictions put on the use of electric devices like his one-wheeled skateboard. (CBC - image credit)
Joel Murray, a former Regina city councillor, disagrees with the restrictions put on the use of electric devices like his one-wheeled skateboard. (CBC - image credit)

Former Ward 6 city councillor Joel Murray has added his voice to those who oppose the traffic bylaw that restricts e-devices in Regina.

Murray says that the electric vehicles like scooters, skateboards and other alternative modes of transportation are good for businesses, and can help the city reach its goal of zero emissions by 2050.

"There's a lot of local businesses that are also becoming distributors of these vehicles, and it throws their business in for a loop because now they're not supposed to be used on our streets," said Murray, an enthusiastic one-wheel electric skateboard user.

In mid-June, the Regina Police Service posted a tweet reminding residents that the devices are illegal for use on city streets under a municipal traffic bylaw because they're considered unlicensed motor vehicles.

Under the bylaw, motor vehicles that can't be registered, including motorized skateboards, pocket bikes, electric scooters and 'hoverboards,' aren't allowed on public property.

"These vehicles aren't really going anywhere. They're going to continue to be around and we need to be able to use them," Murray said.

Unlike fully-powered e-devices, power-assisted bicycles are allowed without registration, as long as they operate within certain speed, power and safety restrictions.

Any change to policies that would allow the use of e-devices on public property would be a joint effort between the city and SGI.

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