C-K has 2,000 online vaccine registrants a day

·2 min read

The COVID-19 online vaccination registration is proving to be popular after receiving 2,000 bookings on its first day.

On Wednesday, CK Public Health launched its online COVID-19 vaccination registration system.

“We’re extremely pleased to have made this option available to residents,” said Jeff Moco, spokesperson for public health.

The online booking system is currently open to residents eligible in Phase 1 of the rollout as well as education workers who provide direct daily support to students with special education needs.

Moco said in terms of Phase 2, Public Health began to vaccinate some of the age categories and will share more details on the other eligible groups of people in the coming days, including those with chronic health conditions, those living or working in congregate environments and those “who cannot work from home.”

Despite the increase in people registered to get vaccinated, there are still no plans for the province to loosen any COVID-19 restrictions for residents that have been fully vaccinated, according to Dr. David Colby, Chatham-Kent’s medical officer of health.

On Friday Chatham-Kent saw another 15 new cases of COVID-19 reported, along with five recoveries, bringing the active total up to 66.

Ursuline College Chatham is listed in outbreak, with two cases.

Hudson Manor in Tilbury remains in outbreak, while Meadow Park in Chatham has been deemed resolved.

As of Friday, more than 26,000 doses of the COVID-19 vaccines have been issued to Chatham-Kent residents.

“The whole idea of vaccinating is to get back to a normal way of society functioning. And I do believe that that is still the key and the vaccines that we have are incredibly effective at preventing serious illness, hospitalization and death due to COVID-19,” he said.

CK Public Health also announced new mobile vaccination clinics in Wheatley and Highgate. Colby is asking that residents attending vaccination clinics or mobile clinics wear a mask and maintain appropriate social distancing measures.

“Because the vaccine does not work instantly. It takes a while to kick in. So if you got exposed at one of those clinics, then the virus would win over the vaccine because it would be faster than the immune response to the vaccine,” he said.

Jenna Cocullo, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter, The Chatham Voice