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Canada men continue to struggle on HSBC SVNS circuit, losing third straight in L.A.

CARSON, Calif. — The Canadian men's tough run on the HSBC SVNS circuit continued Saturday with losses to Fiji and Britain at the HSBC SVNS Los Angeles.

The Canadians, 24-7 losers to France on Friday, were beaten 40-0 by Fiji and 31-14 by Britain to finish at the bottom of Pool C at Dignity Health Sports Park.

The Canadian men, a rebuilding squad under coach Sean White, have lost 13 straight since defeating France 33-7 on Dec. 10 to finish seventh in Cape Town.

The Canadian women, who defeated Britain 20-10 on Friday, opened the day by blanking Spain 31-0 on tries by Carissa Norsten, Krissy Scurfield, Breanne Nicholas, Chloe Daniels and Maddie Grant.

The women lost 22-19 to the U.S. later Saturday in a game to decide first place in Pool C. Scurfield, Asia Hogan-Rochester and Sabrina Poulin scored tries for Canada, which rallied from a 12-0 halftime deficit.

The Canadian women will play France on Sunday in the Cup quarterfinals. The men, meanwhile, will face South Africa in the 11th-place playoff.

Alex Russell and Kalin Sager scored tries for the Canadian men against Britain, leading 14-10 at the break. Sager scored on the stroke of halftime, fending off Ross McCann en route to the try-line.

Canada's Josiah Morra made a tackle in the fourth minute to deny a try to Jamie Barden, whose foot was in touch upon video review.

Morgan Williams scored two tries for Britain while Alex Davis, Robbie Fergusson and Tom Emery added singles.

The Canadian men finished last in the Dubai, Perth and Vancouver tournaments and came to L.A. in 12th and last place in the season standings.

The slimmed-down sevens circuit features seven regular-season events, each featuring men's and women's competition, plus a grand final with promotion and relegation at stake.

After Los Angeles, the teams go to Hong Kong and Singapore before wrapping up in Madrid from May 31 to June 2.

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This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 2, 2024.

The Canadian Press