Canadians want action from the Government of Canada to keep the fisheries healthy

·3 min read

Fishery organizations call for a crackdown on those that break the rules

OTTAWA, ON, Aug. 14, 2020 /CNW/ - A new national survey shows that a very strong majority of Canadians want fisheries where everyone respects fishing regulations and the rules are enforced by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. Commissioned by a coalition of fisherman's organizations and conducted by Nanos Research, Canadians believe that direct negotiations between the government, Indigenous leaders and fishing organizations are important in managing the fisheries.

Nanos Research Logo (CNW Group/Nanos Research Corporation)
Nanos Research Logo (CNW Group/Nanos Research Corporation)

"Some individuals are openly breaking the rules meant to keep our fisheries healthy and sustainable," says Maritime Fishermen's Union President Gaetan Robichaud. "We need the Government of Canada to protect the public good. That means cracking down on all fishing outside of government established fishing seasons immediately. Inaction puts the future of the fisheries at risk for everyone," according to Colin Sproul of the Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen's Association.

The research suggests that average Canadians are on the same page as Canada's leading fishing organizations. About nine in ten Canadians (89%) say it is important to ensure everyone respects the fishing regulations based on the principles of sustainability and more than eight in 10 (87%) say it's important to enforce the rules set by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

"Canadians would be shocked to learn that the Government of Canada is inconsistent in enforcing its own rules meant to protect the fisheries. Licensed fishermen who respect the rules are witnessing government inaction. It must end," says Bernie Berry of the Coldwater Lobster Association.

The same national survey also suggests solutions. Eight in 10 Canadians (79%) believe it is important to have the Government, Indigenous Leaders and fishing organizations negotiate directly together to manage the fisheries.

"Our coalition of fishing organizations in Atlantic Canada and Quebec are ready to be at the table to talk directly with the Government and Indigenous Leaders today to create a positive future for the fisheries for everyone," states Prince Edward Island Fishermen's Association President Bobby Jenkins. "Sadly, our calls for the government to convene the key players directly has fallen on deaf ears but it's not too late and we welcome action from the government," according to O'Neil Cloutier of the Regroupement des pêcheurs professionnels de sud de le Gaspésie in Québec.

COALITION OF ATLANTIC AND QUÉBEC FISHING ORGANIZATIONS
Regroupement des pêcheurs professionnels du sud de la Gaspésie
Maritime Fishermen's Union (MFU)
PEI Fishermen's Association (PEIFA)
Fundy North Fishermen's Association (FNFA)
Cape Breton Fish Harvesters Association (CBFHA)
Coldwater Lobster Association (CLA)
Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen's Association (BoFIFA)
Scotia Fundy Inshore Fishermen's Association (SFIFA)
Brazil Rock 33/34 Lobster Association
Gulf Nova Scotia Bonafide Fishermen's Association (GNSBFA)
Guysborough County Inshore Fishermen's Association (GCIFA)
Eastern Shore Fishermen's Protective Association (ESPFA)
Gulf Nova Scotia Fleet Planning Board (GNSFPB)

About the research: Nanos conducted an RDD dual frame (land- and cell-lines) hybrid telephone and online random survey of 1,094 Canadians, 18 years of age or older, between July 26th and 30th, 2020 as part of an omnibus survey. The results were statistically checked and weighted by age and gender using the latest Census information and the sample is geographically stratified to be representative of Canada. The margin of error for this survey is ±3.0 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Full methodological details on the survey including all of the questions asked are posted at www.nanos.co.

SOURCE Nanos Research Corporation

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