Cavs coach Tyronn Lue: 'We're not broken, all right? We lost a game'

OAKLAND, Calif. — Exasperated by a wasted effort in a stunning loss, irritated by some questionable officiating, and agitated by questions about J.R. Smith’s inexplicable mental lapse, LeBron James decided he was done for the evening. James placed the microphone on the podium, slipped on sunglasses, scooped up his ginormous man purse, and served up one more lecture for inquiring minds in the room: “Be better tomorrow.”

[Yahoo Fantasy Football leagues are open: Sign up now for free]

The message was intended for a reporter who drove him beyond annoyance, but it could also be used as a rallying cry for his Cleveland Cavaliers. After their disappointing loss to the Golden State Warriors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday, many of the Cavaliers had their fingers pointed squarely at the officiating crew that they believe cost them the game. They dropped F-bombs in the locker room. Coach Tyronn Lue claimed the Cavaliers were “robbed” when James drew an offensive foul on Kevin Durant, but later had the call overturned following a review that was triggered to determine if James was in the restricted area near the basket. James was perturbed by the call — which was upheld Friday in the league’s Last Two Minutes Report — and some other fouls and non-calls that went in the Warriors’ favor. Afterward, he said, “Some plays … were kind of taken away from us. Simple as that.”

It was that kind of night for LeBron James and the Cavs in Game 1. (Getty Images)

But the Cavaliers can’t change what has already been done. They can’t control rulings on the floor or in the NBA replay center in Secaucus, New Jersey. They can, however, “be better.”

Even after the uproar over the block/charge reversal and the perceived phantom whistles, Cleveland still had George Hill at the foul line with 4.7 seconds left and a chance to take the lead. It still had Smith snatching a rebound from Durant close enough to make a go-ahead layup or fadeaway jumper. Smith’s apparent ignorance with regard to time and score was on display as he dribbled out the clock, helplessly looked at an incredulous James and appeared to say, “I thought we were ahead.” Even after all of that, the Cavaliers still had a five-minute overtime frame to complete the upset. By then, James was broken, the rest of his teammates were just ready for the game to be over and the Warriors snatched it.

Bad breaks and mental lapses aren’t easily overcome in the Finals. San Antonio never recovered from allowing Chris Bosh to rebound the ball and find Ray Allen in the corner for a tying 3-pointer in Game 6 in 2013. The Spurs surrendered in overtime and had nothing for Game 7. Rasheed Wallace chased Manu Ginobili in the corner and left Robert Horry open for a go-ahead three in Game 5 in 2005. Detroit won the next game but also went down in seven. It’s hard enough winning four games off any team when you reach this point in the season, so having to win five times against a very good opponent is even more demoralizing.

“We’re not broken, all right? We lost a game,” Lue said Friday in a conference call with reporters. “You’ve got to win four in the series. We understand that. It was a tough game for us. We played well enough to win, but we didn’t. Now we’ve got to move on. The guys’ confidence is not shaken. We’ll see what we need to do and how we need to perform to win. We have the blueprint, so now we have to execute at a higher level.”

Smith’s blunder is an all-timer and set him up for internet roasts long after his playing career is over. Missing a shot, coughing up the ball, or blowing a defensive assignment are common offenses in the NBA, but Smith committed the indefensible — he didn’t seem to know the score. James’ anguished face as he looked at Smith — similar to that of a disappointed parent who patiently and diligently explained the rules to the kid — said more than any words could. Though Smith has absorbed an inordinate amount of blame, Hill took the defeat especially hard. He knows he could’ve spared Smith scapegoat status and possibly given the Cavaliers a well-earned win by simply making the free throw.

“I stayed up most of the night rewatching the free throw, rewatching the play. Just going over it in my head what I think went wrong,” Hill said. “As a player, competitive guy, put in a situation to help my team win a game, and I didn’t come through. So for me, it sucked. It was one of the worst feelings ever.”

James played the basketball equivalent of a perfect game in regulation, scoring a playoff career-high 49 points with eight assists and seven rebounds in 43 minutes. He got the Cavaliers there, just needed his teammates not to do anything stupid. And, well … Drained physically and mentally by the time overtime came around, James added two free throws and missed all four of his shots. Smacking a Stephen Curry layup attempt off the glass provided the only outlet for him to vent his frustration. Curry jokingly asked James why he wouldn’t let him score and James shoved him away, cursing as he told him to get out of his face. James said earlier this postseason that he loses sleep after any playoff loss, and it’s hard to imagine he had any after admitting how much Game 1 stung.

“We played as well as we’ve played all postseason, and we gave ourselves a chance possession after possession after possession,” James said.

The Finals have only produced six 50-point games, but not only was James the first to have such a performance in a loss, his epic showing somehow became a footnote to the other absurdities. All postseason, James has been able to bounce back and give the Cavaliers every ounce of juice he can squeeze from that orange. In Game 1, his teammates knocked the glass over and stained the carpet, too, but they’ll need more of the same from James to have any chance of finishing the job in Game 2. Lue was asked if James was capable of playing better than he did.

“I hope so,” Lue said with a laugh.

Be better. And that includes everyone.

More from Yahoo Sports:
Eric Adelson: Soccer star rejects USWNT because of LGBTQ gear
Love explains why he left bench during G1 skirmish
Scary moment as tennis player collides with ballboy
LeBron has testy exchange with reporter over Smith’s blunder

  • What you need to know about legally ordering marijuana online
    News
    CBC

    What you need to know about legally ordering marijuana online

    As of Oct. 17, each person of legal age in their province can legally purchase and possess 30 grams of marijuana. From the RCMP: Canada Post has standard operating procedures in place related to the inspection of mail while in transit. From Canada Post: Canada Post has been delivering medical cannabis safely since 2013.

  • Nunavut officials say cannabis legalization is start of longer conversation
    News
    CBC

    Nunavut officials say cannabis legalization is start of longer conversation

    Wednesday marks the start of legal cannabis in Canada and a larger conversation about its pros and cons, according to several Nunavut officials who've been preparing for Oct. 17. Iqaluit's city bylaws prohibit smoking in any place where the smoke could enter another person's residence or a public place. "Hopefully when the time comes for some revenue sharing, [the government of Nunavut will be] willing to help acknowledge that we have costs, and therefore share some of the revenue," Stevenson said.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Analysis: Trump's Saudi bet has become much riskier

    President Donald Trump put a big and risky bet on Saudi Arabia and its 33-year-old crown prince. From the early days of his presidency, Trump and his foreign policy team embraced the kingdom and Mohammed bin Salman as the anchors of their entire Middle East strategy. From Iran and Iraq to Syria, Yemen and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the administration gambled that Saudi Arabia, effectively run by the prince, could credibly lead, and willingly pay for, a "Pax Arabica" in a part of the world from which Trump is keen to disengage.

  • Hackers accused of ties to Russia hit three East European companies: cybersecurity firm
    News
    Reuters

    Hackers accused of ties to Russia hit three East European companies: cybersecurity firm

    A report by researchers at Slovakia-based ESET did not attribute the hacking activity, recorded between 2015 and mid-2018, to any specific country but blamed it on a group that has been accused by Britain of having links to Russian military intelligence. The report is the latest to raise suspicions in the West about Russia's GRU spy agency, accused by London of conducting a "reckless campaign" of global cyber attacks and trying to kill a former Russian spy in England. Moscow denies the charges.

  • Asylum seekers crossing back to the U.S. illegally
    CBC

    Asylum seekers crossing back to the U.S. illegally

    Asylum seekers crossing into Canada at illegal points of entry, it's a scene that has become familiar to Canadians in recent years. Just last month, the RCMP apprehended 1,600 people. But now some are opting to jump back across the border into the U.S. illegally, and that has U.S. border patrol agents on the look out.

  • Uber IPO proposals value company at $120 billion: WSJ
    News
    Reuters

    Uber IPO proposals value company at $120 billion: WSJ

    Ride-hailing company Uber Technologies Inc [UBER.UL] could be valued at $120 billion, when it finally goes public next year according to proposals made by U.S. banks bidding to run the offering, the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday. The proposed valuation of the company is about $50 billion more than the company's most recent valuation, setting the stage for what would be one of the biggest listings ever. Reuters reported in late September that Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley were in pole position to secure top roles in Uber IPO.

  • Building a lifelong love of opera in toddlers, one hop at a time
    News
    Reuters

    Building a lifelong love of opera in toddlers, one hop at a time

    Welcome to London's Royal Opera House, where Opera Dots, a workshop for toddlers, aims to build a future fan base, one hop at a time. Beneath an elegant iron-and-glass ceiling, a group of young guests giggle on a multi-colored play mat as they mimic a costumed performer singing and dancing her way through 'Hansel and Gretel'. According to its annual reports, attendance at the Royal Opera House has fallen by 137,000 since 2013.

  • Samsung Electronics buys network analysis firm Zhilabs in 5G push
    News
    Reuters

    Samsung Electronics buys network analysis firm Zhilabs in 5G push

    Samsung Electronics Co Ltd said on Wednesday it has bought Barcelona-based network data analysis firm Zhilabs, as the South Korean giant gears up to launch products for connected devices and 5G mobile services that require fast data crunching. Samsung did not disclose the value of the deal, which marks the first announced acquisition in new technologies since companies in the Samsung group pledged in August a 25 trillion won ($22.23 billion) investment in artificial intelligence, 5G, electronic components for autos, and biopharmaceuticals. Samsung is betting that Zhilabs, which uses artificial intelligence to analyze network data, would help its transition to newer 5G gear, as it uses automated network analytics tool for fast data crunching.

  • PHOTOS: Canada celebrates marijuana legalization with many, many puns
    Yahoo Canada News

    PHOTOS: Canada celebrates marijuana legalization with many, many puns

    Canadians from coast to coast are marking the legalization of cannabis across the country. From food companies to marijuana purchasers, pot supporters and museums, people are definitely capitalizing on hilarious weed-related marketing and social media content while celebrating their first legal puff.

  • News
    Reuters

    Roseanne character dies of opioid overdose as 'The Conners' take over

    Comedy series "The Conners," featuring all the main characters in the blue-collar family from "Roseanne" except for its star and creator, Roseanne Barr, had its premiere on Disney-owned channel ABC, five months after "Roseanne" was canceled following a racist tweet by Barr. Audiences had last seen Roseanne Conner hiding an opioid addiction stemming from knee pain and about to undergo long-delayed, costly surgery. "We regret that ABC chose to cancel Roseanne by killing off the Roseanne Conner character.

  • First legal weed sold in Canada at Newfoundland shops
    News
    CBC

    First legal weed sold in Canada at Newfoundland shops

    The first legal recreational cannabis has officially been sold in Canada. In Newfoundland and parts of Labrador, which has a separate timezone from the rest of Canada, midnight comes earlier, and people were ready and waiting for marijuana to be sold to them over the counter. The first sales went to Ian Power and Nikki Rose, who lined up outside awaiting the opening of the Tweed retail location on Water Street in downtown St. John's.

  • More than 200 Calgarians turn out for 1st public session on 2026 Olympic bid
    News
    CBC

    More than 200 Calgarians turn out for 1st public session on 2026 Olympic bid

    Calgary held the first of six public engagement sessions Tuesday to provide information and let people weigh in on whether or not the city should bid for the 2026 Winter Olympic Games. Barbara Hennessey was one of more than 200 people who attended the open house at the Dalhousie Community Association, hoping to gain some information to help her decide how to vote on Nov. 13. "It's a no, I don't feel Calgary is in a position to host them right now.

  • Philippine watchdog fines Grab, Uber for rushed merger, drop in service quality
    News
    Reuters

    Philippine watchdog fines Grab, Uber for rushed merger, drop in service quality

    The Philippines' competition watchdog fined ride-hailing firms Grab and Uber Technologies on Wednesday, saying they consummated their merger too soon and that the quality of service dipped, becoming the second regulator in the region to penalize them. Uber [UBER.UL] sold its money-losing Southeast Asian business to bigger regional rival Grab in March, prompting regulators in the region to scrutinize the deal to see if it substantially reduces competition and leads to poor service. The Philippine Competition Commission (PCC) approved Grab's acquisition of Uber's operations in August, making it conditional upon rules being met to ensure fairness to consumers given Grab's stranglehold on the local market.

  • Cleanup of wind and solar sites won't land at Alberta farmers' feet
    News
    CBC

    Cleanup of wind and solar sites won't land at Alberta farmers' feet

    The province has had renewable energy development for over two decades, but landowner advocates have more recently grumbled about insufficient rules. For one, farmers and landowners wanted to make sure their property is returned to its prior state when renewable facilities expired. Now, Alberta Environment has issued rules that explicitly state operators have a duty to conserve and reclaim the land after they have finished using it.

  • Training for truckers should be mandatory in N.L., driver says
    News
    CBC

    Training for truckers should be mandatory in N.L., driver says

    In the wake of the Humboldt Broncos crash in Saskatchewan in April that killed 16 people and resulted in multiple charges against the trucking company involved, one trucker in Newfoundland and Labrador says there should be mandatory training for tractor trailer drivers.

  • New food bank run by veterans, for veterans opens in Calgary
    News
    CBC

    New food bank run by veterans, for veterans opens in Calgary

    Calgary now has a new food bank run by veterans, for veterans after their old food bank unexpectedly closed months ahead of schedule. The Veterans Association Food Bank officially opened its doors on Monday. The shelves were empty, but spokesperson Marie Blackburn said they don't expect them to stay that way for long.

  • Citing U.S. rules, Inuvialuit put stop to pot sales in Inuvik
    News
    CBC

    Citing U.S. rules, Inuvialuit put stop to pot sales in Inuvik

    Cannabis becomes legal on Wednesday, but unlike other large communities in the N.W.T., residents in Inuvik won't be able to visit a store to buy it. The Inuvik liquor store is owned by the Inuvialuit Development Corporation, a subsidiary of the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation (IRC), and its board voted that the business should sell not cannabis. Inuvialuit beneficiaries directly control the IRC, so the board felt it could put them at risk if they try to cross the United States border and had a connection to the sale of cannabis.

  • Little Pine, Poundmaker First Nations team up to train special constables
    News
    CBC

    Little Pine, Poundmaker First Nations team up to train special constables

    With an instructor from North West College, Saskatchewan's Little Pine First Nation and Poundmaker Cree Nation, northwest of the Battlefords, are training about 20 band members to act as the eyes and ears for their communities. Along with evidence notebooks, the textbooks on the recruits' desks include The Art of Tactical Communications and A Pocket Criminal Code. Over the six-week course, the participants — who all had to undergo criminal record checks and drug screening before they could apply for the course, Little Pine leaders say — will learn how to use pepper spray, batons and handcuffs for defence before they begin patrolling their reserves.

  • News
    Reuters

    London travelers face disruption as Heathrow rail line suspended

    Rail travelers in and out of London faced disruption on Wednesday after damage to overhead power lines stopped trains running between the British capital and Heathrow Airport and destinations in the west of the country. Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, and London are linked by a fast rail connection from Paddington station. UK infrastructure operator Network Rail said services were suspended on Wednesday after lines were damaged on Tuesday.

  • Meet your new Calgary pot dealers
    News
    CBC

    Meet your new Calgary pot dealers

    Charles Mannix is one of the directors of 420 Premium Market — one of just two cannabis retail outlets in Calgary set to blaze a new trail now that marijuana use is legal in Canada. 420 Premium opens Wednesday at 9 a.m. in a busy strip mall at 9737 Macleod Trail S.W. The company plans to open another location in the northwest community of Sage Hill, but there could be more. The only other retail outlet to open in Calgary on legalization day is Nova Cannabis at 10816 Macleod Trail South, where the doors open at 10 a.m.

  • Photos: These are the first Canadians to buy legal weed
    Yahoo Canada News

    Photos: These are the first Canadians to buy legal weed

    As of 12:01 a.m., recreational cannabis became legal across Canada. Well before the hour struck, lineups were queueing up outside pot stores in the country’s biggest cities. Ian Power was the first person to purchase legal marijuana in Canadian history. He lined up at midnight in St. John’s during the opening of the Tweed retail location. That event was attended by Bruce Linton, CEO of Canopy Growth Corporation, which owns the Tweed brand. “I’m elated,” Power told CBC News. “I’m so excited, I can’t stop smiling. I’m not cold. It’s freezing cold out, but I’m not cold.” Power also told The Canadian Press he was not actually going to smoke the first bud he bought, and would keep it as a memento “forever.” On Wednesday morning, stores began opening in other provinces, and more Canadians made their first purchases. Among those waiting outside the store in Sydney River, N.S. was none other than Canadian fiddling legend Ashley MacIsaac. “I don’t need to be a criminal anymore, and that’s a great feeling,” MacIsaac told The Canadian Press. In 2001, he was arrested for possession in Saskatchewan. “And my new dealer is the prime minister!” But not every province and territory has brick-and-mortar locations available. Sales in Ontario will only be through the Ontario Cannabis Store’s website until April 2019 at the earliest. It was down early Wednesday morning, but was back up as of this writing. Alberta’s online pot store also received heavy traffic as soon as 12:01 a.m. hit. At 12:07 a.m. local time, the Alberta Liquor and Gaming Commission tweeted: “You like us! Our website is experiencing some heavy traffic. We are working hard to get it up and running.” Here’s a look at some of the first Canadians to get their hands on legal pot. With files from The Canadian Press.

  • 'It gives people a direction, a purpose': Veteran survivors of sexual assault to compete at Invictus Games
    News
    CBC

    'It gives people a direction, a purpose': Veteran survivors of sexual assault to compete at Invictus Games

    MJ Batek stretches in the pool of the local recreation centre in Cochrane, Alta. Her bathing suit and swim cap are emblazoned with the Canadian maple leaf. Batek is suddenly an ambassador for the Invictus Games, explaining all about the multi-sport competition for wounded service members and veterans. Minutes later, Batek is powering through the breaststroke.

  • Canada's cannabis rules: Here are the guidelines for every single province
    News
    Yahoo Canada News

    Canada's cannabis rules: Here are the guidelines for every single province

    After 95 years of prohibition, Canada is now the second country in the world where marijuana is legal nationwide. Uruguay set the precedent in 2013.

  • Search engine Baidu becomes first China firm to join U.S. AI ethics group
    News
    Reuters

    Search engine Baidu becomes first China firm to join U.S. AI ethics group

    Chinese search engine Baidu Inc has become the first Chinese company to join an artificial intelligence (AI) ethics group led by top U.S. tech firms, amid wider political clashes over AI competition between China and the United States. The Partnership on AI (PAI), which counts Alphabet Inc's Google, Apple Inc and Facebook Inc as members, is a body that develops ethical guidelines for AI research, including ensuring research does not violate international conventions or human rights.

  • Longer Brexit transition period would not hurt Europe: Asselborn
    News
    Reuters

    Longer Brexit transition period would not hurt Europe: Asselborn

    BERLIN (Reuters) - It would not hurt Europe if Britain was allowed to remain in the European Union customs union and internal market beyond an agreed transitional arrangement, Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn said. "What can be extended with no major problem is the Jan. 1, 2020 date for the transition period. If a year is added to that it won't hurt Europe, I hope not Britain as well," Asselborn told German broadcaster Deutschlandfunk on Wednesday. ...