From 'Star Trek' to 'The Twilight Zone': Get one month of CBS All Access for free with this coupon code

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Catch up on all your favorites with CBS All Access. (Photo: CBS All Access)

From Star Trek and Blue Bloods to Survivor and Twin Peaks, these TV favorites and more are available on CBS All Access. Right now, the streaming service is offering a one-month free trial to all new subscribers with promo code “ALL” at check out.

So if you’re a cord-cutter or just looking for something new to watch, CBS All Access has hundreds of movies and TV shows to check out while you’re stuck at home.

TV shows

As the name suggests, CBS All Access features nearly everything that the CBS broadcast network has to offer, including access to legacy and current TV shows like NCIS, Happy Days, Hawaii Five-O, The Young and The Restless, Seal Team, and more. In fact, the streaming app has original programming available to really sweeten up the service, including Jordan Peele’s Twilight Zone reboot, Why Women Fight, Star Trek: Picard (including the season one finale, which drops on March 26) and more.

And speaking of Star Trek, the streaming service features every spin-off from the original series to the new Star Trek: Discovery. This even includes the short-lived Animated Series from the early ‘70s. It even includes a few of the Star Trek movies, such as The Voyage Home, First Contact, Generations and more.

Get one month of CBS All Access for free. (Photo: CBS Television Distribution)

Meanwhile, it also comes with access to all live TV broadcasts of CBS, CBS News, CBS Sports and ET Live, so you can stay up-to-date with news, sports scores and live TV with just one streaming service.

Check out a list of every TV show that’s available on CBS All Access.

Movies

CBS All Access also has a wide selection of feature films for the whole family. It features heart-thumping action movies like Léon: The Professional, Escape From New York, Starship Troopers, as well as dramas and comedies, such as The Social Network, My Best Friend’s Wedding, Fair Game, What Lies Beneath and more.

The streaming service also includes family favorites, including The Iron Giant, The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn and Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist. There’s something for just about everyone.

Check out a full list of all the movies available on CBS All Access.

Stay in and watch CBS All Access. (Photo: Getty Images)

Where can I watch?

Luckily, CBS All Access is available to stream on various mobile devices and TVs, so you can always have the service ready to go. If you have a Samsung, LG or Vizio smart TV, then you can get CBS All Access through your TV’s app store. However, the service is also available on Fire TV, Google Chromecast, Roku or Apple TV streaming devices, as well as PS4 or Xbox One video game consoles.

Meanwhile, if you want to watch on your smartphone or tablet, it’s available via the Android or iOS mobile app. In fact, you can even watch CBS All Access on your laptop or desktop on CBS.com. If there’s a screen and Wi-Fi available, you can stream it.

Bottom line

If you want to try something new, CBS All Access is a great option with older and current TV shows available to stream, as well as access to live TV broadcasts for entertainment and news.

However, once the free trial is over, the service charges you either $6 per month with limited commercials or $10 per month without ads (not including live TV).

But act fast and shop now, this deal ends on April 23.

Shop it: CBS All Access, one month for free with promo code “ALL” (was $6 per month), cbs.com

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  • Ontario intensive care units see jump in COVID-19 patients
    News
    CBC

    Ontario intensive care units see jump in COVID-19 patients

    The number of confirmed COVID-19 patients in intensive care units around Ontario has doubled in less than two days, prompting concern that the virus has actually been spreading more rapidly than previously thought.  There were 43 patients hospitalized in Ontario's ICUs on Friday, up from 29 on Thursday and 17 on Wednesday, according to figures from the province's associate chief medical officer of health, Dr. Barbara Yaffe.That rapid jump in the number of patients in critical care is distressing, said Dr. David Fisman, a University of Toronto epidemiologist.The data "suggests that the epidemic three weeks ago was likely much larger than we previously believed," said Fisman. "It also suggests that we may see a rapid surge in ICU occupancy, potentially leading to a situation like that in New York, if this growth continues." The number of patients in intensive care is considered a crucial measure because ICUs have been the first part of the hospital systems to be overwhelmed in the COVID-19 outbreaks in Italy, Spain and New York. Evidence from the pandemic so far suggests it typically takes two to three weeks for someone to go from contracting the virus to showing symptoms to needing hospitalization.  Fisman said a crucial detail is whether the bulk of the patients in Ontario ICUs contracted COVID-19 in nursing homes or in the community, something the province's ministry of health has not made public. Calls for 'clear, transparent' information sharingIf the cases in ICU consist largely of people from long-term care homes, that may mean the spread of the coronavirus in the community was not so rapid as the hospitalization data imply.Fisman is calling for "clear, transparent and honest information sharing" from the Ministry of Health and Public Health Ontario.Senior provincial health officials are declining to say specifically where those 43 patients are hospitalized.However, some hospitals have begun publicly reporting their numbers of patients who have tested positive for COVID-19. Based on those public postings and inquiries by CBC News, here are some numbers of patients in ICUs:     * 6 - Southlake Regional Health Centre in Newmarket * 5 - Mackenzie Health in Richmond Hill  * 3 - London Health Sciences Centre  * 3 - University Health Network, which includes Toronto General and Toronto Western hospitals * 12 - at other Toronto hospitals, according to information made public by Mayor John Tory on Friday * 1 - at Brampton Civic Hospital, part of the William Osler Health System On Friday, Ministry of Health officials gave assurances that the province's hospitals have cleared space in critical care units, in part through postponing non-emergency surgeries, and have plans to ramp up capacity if necessary. About 68 per cent of ICU beds across the province are currently occupied, leaving about 400 ICU spots available, the officials said during a briefing with reporters. Testing regime picking up cases 1 or 2 weeks after infectionHowever the most-specialized ICU beds — known as Level 3, typically what is needed to care for the most severely ill COVID-19 patients — are running at 85 per cent capacity. An updated model by a group of Toronto-based scientists suggests more than 700 patients in Ontario will need ICU beds by early April, given the current rate of spread of the virus. The epidemiology model was created by a team from the University of Toronto, University Health Network and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.   The next few days will reveal crucial information about Ontario's efforts to slow the spread of the virus, according to numerous health officials.That's because the province's physical distancing measures began in mid-March, with the announcement of school closures and the ensuing declaration of a state of emergency. Ontario's testing regime is typically picking up cases one to two weeks after contracting the virus.  The evidence of success will be whether the daily increase in new cases starts to slow down.While provincial officials are preparing for the possibility of a rapid surge in cases, as happened in Italy, the trend in Ontario does not appear that steep, said Dr. Kevin Smith, CEO of the University Health Network, serving as co-chair of the critical care section of the province's COVID-19 response team.  "It could dramatically turn around if our physical distancing isn't consistent and the recently returning Canadians aren't following the segregation rules," said Smith during the Friday briefing. "We won't really know this probably for another three to five days."Officials and epidemiologists are uncertain when Ontario's COVID-19 caseload will hit its peak or when the demands on hospitals will be the greatest. "We're basically recalibrating the models pretty much every day based on the data," said Helen Angus, deputy minister of health and chair of the province's COVID-19 command table. "I can't give you a precise date of the peak or the shape of the curve at the moment."  In addition to the six ICU patients at Southlake who have tested positive, three more are presumed to have the virus, the hospital's CEO Arden Krystal said Friday evening. "I anticipate within a matter of a number of days our main ICU [with 15 beds] will have COVID patients only," said Krystal in an interview with CBC News. "These are very sick patients and they require a lot of resources." At 500 beds, Southlake is one of the largest hospitals in the province. "We have many plans in place to continue to expand our ICU capacity and we have significant stock of ventilators," Krystal said. The hospital could move patients who don't have COVID-19 from the main ICU to other critical care wards, such as its cardiac critical care unit. Southlake officials decided to post their COVID-19 patient numbers publicly to "quell the rumour mill" and to educate the public about the importance of physical distancing in slowing the spread of the virus, said Krystal. "It makes it more real for the community," she said. "They realize that it's really happening."   Quick facts about Ontario's hospitals  * 2,053 adult intensive care beds   * 1,321 of those are equipped with ventilators * 209 ventilators in the provincial stockpile are ready to be deployed now * around 600 other ventilators can be made available for hospitals through various means, including Ontario's share of a federal stockpile      * 800 new ventilators have been ordered by the province; Only 40 have been received so far, and it will likely take months for the bulk to arrive, according to officials  Overall hospital occupancy rate in Ontario is currently at 77 per cent, while last year at this time it was averaging 97 per cent. That means about 6,400 hospital beds are now available. Source: Ontario Ministry of Health briefing

  • What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Saturday, March 28
    News
    CBC

    What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Saturday, March 28

    Recent developments: * The city's total has now surpassed 100 confirmed cases, including a resident of an Orléans retirement home and their spouse. * OPH says 17 in hospital, seven in intensive care unit. * Seven patients in ICU, most in their 50s and 60s. * Two Hull Hospital workers among 18 COVID-19 patients in Outaouais.  * OPH thanks residents for physical distancing, self-isolation but says people must continue in order to slow the spread of COVID-19. * Provincewide, Ontario has 151 new cases of COVID-19 as of Saturday afternoon.What you should knowAs the number of COVID-19 cases in Ontario doubles roughly every four days, Ottawa Public Health (OPH) is urging everyone to continue to practise physical distancing and self-isolation when required to flatten the curve as much as possible.As of Saturday afternoon, there are 106 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the city.  Of the positive cases, 17 are in hospital and seven of those patients are in intensive care. OPH said most patients in the ICU are in their 50s and 60s, and only one patient is over the age of 70.The city's medical officer of health Vera Etches said that's a reminder people of any age can have severe symptoms of the virus, not just the elderly. "We know that staying home and practising physical distancing or being in self isolation is not easy and we thank you for what you're doing to help plank the curve," said Etches in a news conference Friday.LISTEN: The latest from Vera Etches on COVID-19 in OttawaPhysical distancing means avoiding non-essential trips out, working from home and cancelling gatherings, even with friends or extended family.OPH advises residents to only be with members of their own household and stay at least two metres away from everyone else.Public health officials are also urging anyone who's had close contact with someone who has travelled outside the country to self-solate for 14 days.That means staying home for two weeks and asking relatives, friends or neighbours to deliver groceries, medication and other supplies. All deliveries should be left at the door to maintain a two-metre distance.WATCH: Trudeau on why your choices matter todayPeople who feel sick should also self-isolate for 14 days or until 24 hours after their symptoms are gone, whichever is longer.Travellers who return to Canada must now enter a mandatory 14-day period of self-isolation or face a fine of up to $750,000, or as much as six months in jail, unless they're an essential worker.How daily life is changingMany municipalities across Canada have declared states of emergency, including in eastern Ontario. In Ottawa declaring an emergency allows the city to buy needed equipment and supplies without the usual procurement process, including personal protective equipment, food for the vulnerable and hotel rooms for emergency workers.Ontario and Quebec have ordered all non-essential businesses to close.Ontario Provincial Police said Friday officers will fine individuals or businesses that break the physical distancing rules.Police in Quebec are also enforcing a ban on gatherings of more than two people.WATCH: Provinces open up COVID-19 snitch linesSports venues such as fields and courts are closed to discourage gatherings. City playgrounds, parks facilities and off-leash dog parks are closed. The NCC has closed Gatineau Park along with parking lots at its trails and dog parks in Ottawa's Greenbelt.Quebec schools are closed until at least May, while Ontario has launched an e-learning program while its schools remain closed, likely past the initial date of April 6.WATCH: CBC Ottawa's Local Daily for Friday, March 27Public transit authorities are scaling back service because ridership has dropped substantially. Ottawa residents needing information can still call 311, and all essential services such as garbage and recycling collection, as well as some bylaw services, will continue. Service Canada has closed its centres to in-person visits, focusing on telephone and online work.Spread of COVID-19 in OttawaOttawa's health-care sector is ramping up for an expected surge in COVID-19 patients. Doctors, nurses and cleaning staff in Ottawa are already starting to ration disposable masks to conserve the current supply. The Montfort and Queensway Carleton hospitals are preparing to open up urgent care centres for COVID-19 patients. More details on that are expected next week. The Ottawa Hospital is doubling its number of intensive care beds and seeking donations of masks and other personal protective equipment at coviddonations@toh.ca. On Friday, OPH announced a resident of an Orléans retirement home is among those in hospital with COVID-19, along with the resident's spouse.The public health agency said all other residents at the Promenade retirement home are in isolation, while employees are being monitored for symptoms and are donning personal protective equipment.The city saw its first COVID-19-related death on March 25, a man in his 90s with no travel history.The Front Steps: Ottawa photographer brings viral photo project to RocklandOntario has 1,144 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Quebec has 2,498 confirmed cases and 22 deaths attributable to COVID-19.Fifty-five deaths in Canada have been linked to COVID-19, including 18 each in Ontario and Quebec. Ottawa's medical officer of health said the virus could infect 4,000 people a day at its peak if physical distancing and self-isolation recommendations aren't respected.What are the symptoms of COVID-19?Symptoms of COVID-19 range from a very mild, cold-like illness to a severe lung infection. The most common symptoms include fever, fatigue and a dry cough.They may take up to 14 days to appear, which is why that's the period of self-isolation.Older people, those with compromised immune systems and those with underlying medical problems such as high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes are more likely to develop serious illness.The coronavirus primarily spreads through droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes.The virus can also spread through close, prolonged contact, such as touching or handshaking, and via surfaces such as door handles, mobile phones, tables and light switches if they touch their eyes, nose or mouth before washing their hands.When to get testedOPH asks that everyone who is concerned they may have COVID-19 first fill out Ontario's online assessment tool. Unless you have severe symptoms, like shortness of breath, the best course of action is to stay home. Currently Ottawa is prioritizing tests for those who are most in need.If you have a worsening cough and/or fever and you travelled outside of Canada or been in contact with someone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the past 14 days, OPH asks that you visit the COVID-19 screening centre at the Brewer Arena.The centre is open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily at 151 Brewer Way, off Bronson Avenue near Carleton University. You don't have to call ahead.If you meet some of the criteria but don't have symptoms, you won't be tested and should self-isolate for 14 days. If you have severe symptoms and cannot manage at home, call 911.WATCH: More COVID-19 cases in Quebec makes staying home 'even more important,' premier saysIn western Quebec:Gatineau's downtown assessment location is at 135 blvd. Saint-Raymond.Outaouais residents should call the regional help line at 819-644-4545 if they have a cough or fever, whether they've travelled or not.If your symptoms require a trip to the emergency room, call ahead if your condition allows to let them know your travel history.Kingston, Ont.The assessment centre in Kingston is now at the Kingston Memorial Centre at 303 York St. It is open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.If you develop mild to moderate symptoms after travelling, either contact your health-care provider or go to the test site.Kingston's public health unit says to check its website for information, and call Telehealth at 1-866-797-0000 with any remaining questions.Other communitiesThe public health unit in the Belleville, Ont., area is asking people only call it at 613-966-5500 if they've checked the website and still have questions.The same advice goes for Leeds, Grenville and Lanark's unit at 1-800-660-5853 extension 2499.It opened a testing site by referral only at the Brockville Memorial Centre at 100 Magedoma Blvd. that's open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.Referrals can come from a family doctor or the public health unit and will only be given to the sick and people who have left the country or been in close contact with a suspected or confirmed case.Hawkesbury, Ont., has an assessment centre at 750 Laurier St. open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday. Like Ottawa, only go there if you have new or worsening symptoms and have travelled or been in contact with a confirmed case. Go to CHEO if you're looking after an infant younger than six months old that fits this description.Self-isolate if you have mild symptoms, go to the hospital if your symptoms are severe.Only people older than age 70, who have chronic health problems or compromised immune systems can call 613-933-1375 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. to ask about a home visit from paramedics.Renfrew County is providing home testing under some circumstances.Its public health unit says people who have symptoms or have been in close contact with a confirmed case should use the province's self-assessment tool.Call Telehealth, their health care provider or it at 613-735-8654 if they still have more questions.Anyone who doesn't have or can't reach a family doctor can call its new primary care centre at 1-844-727-6404 if they have questions about their health.The province says it's doubling its testing capacity by the end of the week and nearly quadrupling that by mid-April.In the Outaouais, the local health agency is calling anyone whose tests take more than a week to get back to them.First Nations communitiesThe Mohawk communities of Akwesasne and Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte (MBQ) have declared a state of emergency to prepare for possible cases.Anyone in MBQ who has symptoms can call 613-967-3603 to talk to a nurse. A home test may be possible after that.In Akwesasne, community members are asked to carry their status cards when crossing the Canada-U.S. border for essential trips.The Algonquin communities of Kitigan Zibi and Pikwakanagan have scaled back non-essential services and are asking residents to follow public health advice.Pikwakanagan's election on Saturday, March 28 is going ahead, with members strongly encouraged to vote remotely.For more information, visit:

  • No more domestic travel by plane or train for those showing coronavirus symptoms, Trudeau says
    News
    CBC

    No more domestic travel by plane or train for those showing coronavirus symptoms, Trudeau says

    Domestic travel by plane or train will soon be off the table for anyone exhibiting symptoms of coronavirus, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Saturday, as part of additional measures to slow the spread of the COVID-19 illness across the country.The restrictions come into effect at noon ET on Monday and apply to anyone showing signs of the virus, which include a cough, fever and difficulty breathing.Those travellers will no longer be able to travel by air or rail between provinces and cities anywhere in Canada. "It will be important for operators of airlines and trains to ensure that people who are exhibiting symptoms do not board those trains," Trudeau said during his daily address to Canadians. "It will be a Transport Canada rule that will be enforced, but at the same time, we're telling people stay home if it's not absolutely essential for you to travel."The prime minister added that the federal government would be providing airlines and rail companies with "further tools" to bar those showing symptoms from getting on planes and trains. Companies to conduct health checksTo roll out the new measures, the Public Health Agency of Canada is providing guidance to air operators and rail companies on conducting health checks on passengers boarding flights and trains within Canada or departing from Canada. As of Monday, passengers can expect to be asked a number of health questions aimed at identifying the "visible signs of illness" and will be refused boarding should they present symptoms. According to a news release from Transport Canada, passengers will be denied boarding "for a period of 14 days, or until a medical certificate is presented that confirms that the traveller's symptoms are not related to COVID-19."The restrictions apply to aircraft with 10 seats or more, while commuter trains are exempt from the measures.Intercity passenger rail operators subject to the additional screening include: * Via Rail Canada Inc. * Great Canadian Railtour Company Ltd. * Keewatin Railway Company. * Ontario Northland Transportation Commission. * White Pass & Yukon Route Railroad. * Transport Ferroviaire Tshiuetin Inc.Screening doesn't apply to interprovincial bus travelTrudeau said that the new measures do not apply to bus travel between provinces, which is regulated by provincial and municipal governments. That means it's not mandatory for passengers to undergo any screening before boarding a bus. "We have been in touch with [bus companies] and recommended ... Public Health Agency of Canada procedures and protocols with respect to cleaning the bus, with respect to trying to keep people at physical distances from each other," said Transport Minister Marc Garneau in an interview with CBC News.Garneau explained that it's up to the provinces to decide if they want to implement the measures, but said that he was told that "very few people" are embarking on bus trips between provinces right now. "We will be speaking to the provinces about this," Garneau said, adding that they "may want to consider" putting similar protocols in place for buses under their jurisdiction. WATCH | Canada's status after two weeks of lockdowns:Njoo: 'We know people can hide symptoms'Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam said details on how companies are expected to enforce the restrictions will be shared "in the coming days."But screening at points of transit — whether border crossings, airports or train stations — isn't completely foolproof, cautioned Dr. Howard Njoo, Canada's deputy chief public health officer.  "It's never a 100 per cent guarantee that we're going to stop further transmission of infection," he said.Njoo said personnel at train stations and airports will be keeping an eye out for travellers who look "unwell,"  but conceded that it's possible to mask symptoms. "We know people can hide symptoms by, for example, taking a Tylenol to mask a fever," he said. "At the end of the day, I think it's not just the responsibility of governments, airline companies, train companies. It's a responsibility of every Canadian."Garneau said that according to Canada's public health agency, people taking medication to reduce their fevers is one of the reasons why personnel screening passengers aren't recommended to use thermometers during the process. Caseload grows across the countryThe number of cases in Canada grew to more that 5,500 on Saturday, though there is some evidence that Canadians staying at home and practising safe distancing is working to contain the spread.British Columbia's health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said Friday that according to modelling in the province, physical distancing restrictions are starting to slow the spread of new COVID-19 cases."I'm trying not to over-call it, but I do believe we've seen a flattening, a falling-off of that curve," Henry said. On Saturday, Trudeau called the prediction "promising news", but said it was not a reason for complacency.Tam echoed the prime minister's words later in the day, along with her own warning."If the trends are slowing down a bit, our key message though is not to sort of relax. Our key message actually is to double down, absolutely double down, and that right now is an absolutely critical time," she said. "If you look at those numbers you realize that we're definitely not out of the woods and [we've] got to keep going."Trudeau family continues to isolateThe prime minister's announcement Saturday comes as his own 14-day period of self-isolation concluded this week, though Trudeau said that, on the advice of medical professionals, he plans to continue working from home. "We've asked people to stay at home and work from home as much as possible and not go out if they don't have to," Trudeau said. "And that certainly is something that we're doing and encouraging."His wife, Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, received a positive COVID-19 test result earlier this month following a visit to London."Sophie is feeling great. My family is doing well. My kids and myself...we're all doing well," the prime minister added.

  • COVID-19 in Canada: Ford blasts 'Un-Canadian' price-gougers, 'Encouraging signs' across country
    News
    Yahoo News Canada

    COVID-19 in Canada: Ford blasts 'Un-Canadian' price-gougers, 'Encouraging signs' across country

    As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    How to protect yourself and others from infection as COVID-19 cases increase

    COVID-19 is now impacting the lives of Canadians on many levels and people across the country are seeking answers to numerous important questions they have about the novel coronavirus. Below is a summary: WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?Health Canada says those who are infected with COVID-19 may have few, if any symptoms, or may not know they're infected because symptoms of the novel coronavirus are similar to a cold or flu.Those symptoms have included fever, cough and difficulty breathing.Other symptoms can include fatigue, mucus production, muscle or joint pain, sore throat, headache and chills. COVID-19 can sometimes escalate to pneumonia.According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, 78 per cent of the people confirmed to have COVID-19 in this country have developed a cough, 49 per cent a fever, and 52 per cent have experienced chills.Symptoms may take up to 14 days to appear after exposure to COVID-19. Health officials are still trying to determine whether the virus can be transmitted to others if someone is not showing symptoms. While experts believe this is possible, it's considered to be rare. WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I THINK I HAVE SYMPTOMS?If you have COVID-19 symptoms, even if they're mild, stay at home and follow local health authorities' instructions to self-isolate.If you feel sick and must visit a health-care professional, Health Canada says you should call ahead or tell them when you arrive that you have a respiratory illness. You may be asked to wear a mask while waiting for or receiving treatment to prevent the spread of the illness.Tell them your symptoms and travel history and let them know whether you've had direct contact with animals or a sick person, especially if they've had symptoms. HOW SICK WILL I GET?Most people diagnosed with COVID-19 experience mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough, and the vast majority of those who contract the virus recover.However, for some, especially older adults and those with pre-existing conditions, it can cause more severe illness, such as pneumonia. In some cases, it can be fatal.As of March 27, six per cent of Canadian cases have required hospitalization, with two per cent of cases requiring admission to the ICU.The World Health Organization has found that among patients in China, 80 per cent suffered mild cough and fever symptoms while 14 per cent suffered severe symptoms requiring treatment, including being placed on ventilators. A further one per cent lapsed into critical condition with symptoms that could include respiratory failure, septic shock and organ failure or dysfunction. HOW DO I KNOW IF I SHOULD BE TESTED FOR COVID-19?The best way to determine if you should go to a testing centre is to call your doctor or local public health office.Canada's chief public health officer Theresa Tam has said tests are prioritized for certain types of cases: travellers who have symptoms; those with severe respiratory illness, regardless of whether they've travelled; people in long-term care facilities with influenza-like illness; and hospital-related illness, including health-care workers who are sick.She emphasized, however, clinicians at assessment centres that are opening up across the country still have the ability to make their own judgement on who gets tested.Several provinces and the federal government have created online self-assessment tools that will advise you what to do. WHAT ABOUT TRAVEL?The government has closed the border with the U.S. for non-essential travel, and strongly advises Canadians to avoid travelling anywhere as many countries impose movement bans, quarantines, and airlines ground flights.All Canadian travellers returning from abroad are told they must self-isolate for 14 days after their arrival, regardless of whether they show symptoms, and monitor their health. HOW DO I SELF-ISOLATE?Ideally, self-isolation means halting all contact with others, and setting up a space dedicated solely to the person being isolated.Those who live with others should try to segregate parts of the home. Do not use common spaces at the same time; stay out of the kitchen; dedicate a separate washroom to that person if possible, and don't share towels or toiletries. Clean spaces where that individual has been and do not touch surfaces that person has touched before cleaning.Only leave the home if it's absolutely necessary, such as to seek medical care.If you have to interact with others, keep it brief. Try to maintain a safe distance and wear a mask, the agency says. Avoid people with chronic conditions, compromised immune systems and older adults. WHAT IS SOCIAL DISTANCING AND HOW CAN I PRACTISE IT?Social distancing involves taking steps to increase the physical space between people to prevent the virus from spreading. Public health officials say this is key to reducing the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak.Officials insist people stay home as much as possible, and those who must go out should stay two metres away from others.Other tips include avoiding crowds and going to public places during off-peak hours. If you are sick, stay home. WHAT HOUSEHOLD ITEMS SHOULD I HAVE IN CASE I NEED TO ISOLATE?Federal Health Minister Patty Hajdu has suggested that people gather enough food and other essentials, such as medicines and toiletries to last them through a two-week quarantine if needed.However, Hajdu and other public officials, including Ontario Health Minister Christine Elliot, are also urging people not to stockpile or hoard these items, insisting it's not necessary.The unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 outbreak has led to many stores being cleared of items such as toilet paper, disinfectant wipes and certain non-perishable foods. HOW ARE CANADIAN OFFICIALS RESPONDING TO COVID-19?Public health officials are working hard to identify and contain cases of community transmission.Many provincial governments are taking extraordinary measures such as prohibiting large gatherings, closing schools and shuttering restaurants, gyms and theatres.Several provinces have declared states of public emergency in response to the pandemic. WHERE CAN I FIND ADDITIONAL CREDIBLE INFORMATION?Check government websites — federal, provincial and municipal — as well as the World Health Organization for the latest, credible information regarding the novel coronavirus.For more information on an epidemiological summary in Canada visit: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/epidemiological-summary-covid-19-cases.html WHERE CAN I FIND PROVINCIAL TESTING INFORMATION?B.C.: 1-888-COVID-19 or healthlinkbc.caAlberta: alberta.ca/coronavirus-info-for-albertansSaskatchewan: saskatchewan.ca/government/health-care-administration-and-provider-resources/treatment-procedures-and-guidelines/emerging-public-health-issues/2019-novel-coronavirusManitoba: 1-888-315-9527 or gov.mb.ca/covid19Ontario: publichealthontario.ca/en/diseases-and-conditions/infectious-diseases/respiratory-diseases/novel-coronavirusQuebec: 1-877-644-4545 or quebec.ca/en/health/health-issues/a-z/2019-coronavirusNew Brunswick: gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/ocmoh/cdc/content/respiratory_diseases/coronavirus.htmlNova Scotia: novascotia.ca/coronavirusPrince Edward Island: 1-800-958-6400 or princeedwardisland.ca/en/topic/covid-19Newfoundland and Labrador: gov.nl.ca/covid-19/Yukon: yukon.ca/en/information-about-novel-coronavirus-yukonersNorthwest Territories: 1-833-378-8297 or hss.gov.nt.ca/en/services/coronavirus-disease-covid-19Nunavut: gov.nu.ca/health/information/covid-19-novel-coronavirusThis report by The Canadian Press was published March 28, 2020 The Canadian Press

  • Sask. premier trails counterparts in attending COVID-19 media conferences
    News
    CBC

    Sask. premier trails counterparts in attending COVID-19 media conferences

    Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe attended two press conferences this week, the fewest among Canadian provincial leaders not self-isolating.Saskatchewan holds a daily briefing at 2:30 p.m. CST. This week four briefings were held, Thursday there was no public availability.Moe attended conferences on Monday and Wednesday. Across the country, each province is dealing with its own unique COVID-19-related challenges.As of Friday, Saskatchewan was third in testing rate among the provinces and had the fifth most infections.In B.C., Premier John Horgan has been available on three occasions this week.In Alberta, Premier Jason Kenney has appeared three times this week to field media questions and held a Facebook live with the province's chief medical health officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw on Thursday.In Manitoba, Premier Brian Pallister attended four of five media briefings.In Ontario and Quebec Premiers Doug Ford and François Legault have held daily briefings.In Atlantic Canada, the premiers of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador have held daily briefings.P.E.I. Premier Dennis King was in self-isolation after returning from a trip to Boston and has been available via video.Trudeau, federal cabinet and Sask. opposition leader available dailyThe daily routine, if you can call it that, in various provinces is a news conference with the region's top doctor and the premier. Some provinces separate the health announcements with those addressing other measures.This week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau held a daily morning briefing outside his home while in self-isolation. His statement and question and answer are followed by another news conference attended by Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam and a variety of federal cabinet ministers.Saskatchewan Opposition Leader Ryan Meili holds a daily video conference at 11 a.m. local. In many cases, Meili has asked for government intervention or action on a particular issue related to COVID-19. "Right now, people expect to hear from their leaders regularly, and want to know they're taking quick action. That's why we'll keep staying in touch with the people of the province as much as possible, and continue to push the government to step up with more supports and more information," Meili said Friday.Moe 'leading government response' says spokespersonWith the legislative session indefinitely suspended, the daily Question Period exchange and subsequent interviews of MLAs have disappeared.The public, many of whom are now stuck at home, have taken to the online daily stream of the government update.The live-streamed news conferences have significant audiences online. The Government of Saskatchewan Facebook page averages around 60,000 views per news conference. CBC Saskatchewan's Facebook page averages between 30,000 and 40,000. Saskatchewan's Chief Medical Health Officer Dr. Saqib Shahab has been the lone constant in the daily conferences.Shahab, however, cannot answer questions about program spending, government decisions on support for low-income people and education plans for example.The government has provided statements and teleconferences with various officials and ministers in the past few days.A spokesperson for the premier said his attendance at news conferences is dependent on what the government is announcing on a particular day."Premier Moe remains actively involved in leading our government's response to the COVID-19 pandemic with the Chief Medical Health Officer and other senior health officials," said a spokesperson for Premier Moe in a statement."Each day we evaluate what information is important to convey to the people of Saskatchewan. When we are communicating information regarding COVID-19 that is medical in nature, it is important for that information to be communicated by the Chief Medical Health Officer. When an announcement is made in regards to restrictions or resource supports, it is important for this information to be communicated by the Premier.""The Premier will continue to regularly communicate with Saskatchewan people through the COVID-19 media briefings, along with other methods of communication," the statement said.

  • Taliban refuses to talk to new Afghan government negotiators
    News
    Reuters

    Taliban refuses to talk to new Afghan government negotiators

    KABUL/PESHAWAR, Pakistan (Reuters) - The Taliban declined on Saturday to begin talks with the Afghan government's new negotiating team in a setback to the U.S.-brokered peace process for one of the world's longest-running conflicts. Spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said the militants could not talk to the 21-member team named on Thursday as it was not constituted taking into account all parties. The team is headed by Masoom Stanekzai, an ex-security chief and supporter of President Ashraf Ghani, and includes politicians, former officials and representatives of civil society.

  • 'Thanks for the food': Inuvik, N.W.T., residents thank truckers with signs on highway
    News
    CBC

    'Thanks for the food': Inuvik, N.W.T., residents thank truckers with signs on highway

    Food security has been front of mind for many people in communities across the North during the COVID-19 pandemic.That was evident in Inuvik, N.W.T., on Friday morning, when a group of truck drivers entering the community saw signs welcoming and thanking them, placed by grateful community members.Poor weather conditions had left the resupply trucks, which were on their way to the Beaufort Delta, stuck in Eagle Plains, Yukon, since Monday.The signs were organized by a group of local "caremongers" that wanted to remain anonymous, saying they don't want the attention on them.The signs were posted starting at the entrance to the Dempster Highway. The Northwest Territories portion of the highway is currently only open to residents and essential workers — including truckers — after the territorial government closed the borders to inbound traffic about a week ago."It was very nice to see the appreciation that the Inuvik community has for these truckers and what they … have gone through during these critical times," said Kevin Ramsay, vice-president of operations with Manitoulin Transport, one of the cargo companies that serve the Beaufort Delta region.Ramsay said there's a significant number of trucks heading to Inuvik each week. He said Manitoulin will continue to do its best to meet the needs of community members."Anything that the community needs, reach out and we'll look after all their business needs," said Ramsay."A big thank you to folks there for recognizing our trucks."

  • Can Dawson City's iconic Westminster Hotel survive the COVID-19 pandemic?
    News
    CBC

    Can Dawson City's iconic Westminster Hotel survive the COVID-19 pandemic?

    It's an iconic Yukon watering hole, a local institution and a vibrant community hub in Dawson City — and like many small businesses these days, its future is far from certain.The Westminster Hotel — a ramshackle, century-old building painted a garish pink and known locally as The Pit — closed this week. Owner Paul McDonagh is not sure if the doors will ever reopen, even when the COVID-19 pandemic is over. "Some points of each day I am thinking, OK, I better call my lawyer because I'm going to have to declare bankruptcy and shut everything down," he said. "But I'm trying to stay positive, and I'm trying to push as many buttons as I can."The territorial government ordered all bars in the territory to close indefinitely last Sunday. It's one of several measures introduced in recent days to control the spread of the coronavirus in the territory. There were three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the territory as of Wednesday.McDonagh understands the need for social distancing. But he worries about his business — and his normally tight-knit, sociable community. "You just walk down the street, nobody here. Everybody's sitting at home, watching TV," he said."There's nobody around. That's really not a good thing for this town. It's not a good thing for the territory."Tourism is Dawson City's lifeblood, and the town's population explodes every summer with visitors and hospitality workers. That's not expected to happen this year.'Your first beer in Dawson'Before this week, The Pit would open its cozy tavern every morning at 9 a.m."We're your first — and last — beer in Dawson," its website proclaims.It's one of a handful of places in town that stays open year-round. Rumour has it that if it were to close for any period, local authorities simply wouldn't allow the old and weathered building to reopen — but McDonagh says that's not true."I don't know where that myth came from. It's a good one," he said.The Westminster Hotel has been in operation since the 1930s and according to the hotel's website, parts of the building are even older. Over the years, the building has reportedly housed a grocer, a boarding house, a diner and an ice cream shop.McDonagh said it's important to keep the business going, not just for his family but for the town. He calls The Pit a "pillar of the community.""This is where people come for a drink, or to meet friends, or to get help, or to borrow a tool, or to borrow money — whatever it is. This place is here to help whoever needs help," he said.Dawson Mayor Wayne Potoroka says there's no question the Westminster Hotel is something special."It's a Dawson icon. It's recognizable in our community, it's recognized right across this country," he said.But Potoroka is also looking at the bigger picture of his community right now, and he's worried. All businesses are suffering, he says."Psychologically, The Pit closing — yeah, it sucks," he said."But [also] all the other businesses that had to shutter their operations because of the recommendations we're living under…. No one's happy to see any business close."Morale 'tanking, fast'McDonagh's now trying to figure how to get a loan to see him through the coming months, but he's not yet certain what his liquor-selling business would qualify for. He's also trying to think up a project at the hotel that might help employ some local people, at least temporarily."I think such a project is necessary because the morale up here in town is tanking, fast," he said."There's no money coming in here now into town, really. And I think it's in everybody's interest to generate some activity here."McDonagh may own the Westminster Hotel but he says he considers it more of a "stewardship." "I'm in charge of keeping this place alive, and keeping it serving the community, and I'm on the verge of not being able to do that any longer," he said."It's an important place. It's important to me and my family, of course, it's important to Dawson City, it's important to the territory."

  • News
    CBC

    Where to find help in P.E.I. during the COVID-19 crisis

    In an effort to help Islanders navigate the COVID-19 pandemic together, while they stay apart, the P.E.I. government has created its Islanders Helping Islanders Volunteers Service Directory.The directory is an initiative put together by political parties on the Island to help people offer and access help in one place, said Minister of Social Development Ernie Hudson in a briefing on Friday afternoon. "In such uncertain and difficult times, it is important to draw on strong community ties and rely on each other to ensure the wellbeing and inclusion of all Islanders, particularly the most vulnerable," he said.Hudson said MLAs Cory Deagle, Lynne Lund and Gord McNeilly have spearheaded the collaborative effort to develop the new resource for Islanders in all 27 electoral districts.The directory includes a list of groups and people from tip-to-tip who are ready to extend a helping hand. It has hundreds of numbers and emails and Hudson expects it to grow over the coming days.'We can continue to serve'Other online resources include the Caremongering group on Facebook, which has over 3,000 members all sharing ideas and and tips on self-isolation and physical distancing as well as helping each other during times like this.As well, organizations and individuals across the Island are providing services like senior check-ins, dog walking and grocery drop-offs.Groups like the Souris Lions Club, which has been offering medication drop-offs to residents as their regular programming has been put on hold due to the pandemic. There's a group of Lions Club members that are ready to help. — Allan Campbell"Our initiative to partner with our local grocers and our pharmacies is just one idea that we came up with ... where we can still continue to serve that community when it needs it the most," said Allan Campbell, president of the club."Of course we have a number of people for different reasons, whether they're seniors or self-isolating, that, you know, are not able to go out and do their own shopping and there's a group of Lions Club members that are ready to help," he said.Hudson said Island organizations or groups wishing to add their contact information to the directory are encouraged to get in touch with their MLA.Those looking to access the directory for help can head to the province's website. In addition to the directory, Islanders can call 1-833-533-9333 for answers to general questions about COVID-19.COVID-19: What you need to knowWhat are the symptoms of COVID-19?Common symptoms include: * Fever. * Cough. * Tiredness.But more serious symptoms can develop, including difficulty breathing and pneumonia, which can lead to death.What should I do if I feel sick?Isolate yourself and call your local public health authority. Do not visit an emergency room or urgent care centre to get tested.How can I protect myself? * Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly. * Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.More detailed information on the outbreak is available on the federal government's website.More COVID-19 stories from CBC P.E.I.

  • News
    CBC

    What can you be fined for under existing COVID-19 measures?

    Between the federal Quarantine Act and Ontario's state of emergency, members of the public could face serious penalties for breaking certain rules.You could face fines — or even jail time — under some of the measures put in place to fight COVID-19.Here's a breakdown:In Ontario, under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, the province can issue orders, which are enforceable by police. Two of the orders currently in place include the mandatory closure of non-essential businesses like public libraries and concert venues as well as the prohibition of gatherings of more than 50 people at a time. * Failure to comply with an order made during a declared emergency - $750 fine * Obstruction of person exercising a power in accordance with an emergency order - $1,000 fine * Corporations that fail to comply - $500,000 fineSgt. Steve Betteridge with Windsor Police Service explained that police can enforce any order made by the province during a declared emergency. It's possible that the province could declare more orders down the road.Quarantine ActUnder the Quarantine Act, there's another set of rules for Canadians returning to the country from abroad. Travellers now have a legal obligation to quarantine for 14 days, and if they disobey that order, they can face serious penalties.  * Failing to comply with the order - maximum fine of $750,000 and/or imprisonment for 6 months * If someone jeopardizes another's life "while wilfully or recklessly contravening the act" - $1 million and/or up to three years in prisonStaff Sgt. Carolle Dionne with Ontario Provincial Police explains that the federal Quarantine Act does not give police any new powers, but police will "assist with requests" from those designated as screening officers or quarantine officers under the act.WPS echoed that, to say they will work with screening officers "if requested."In the meantime, Betteridge says that the Windsor community is doing a "fantastic job" with how it's reacting to the pandemic. "Right now, our members' primary goal in this area is working to spread the word through education and warnings."

  • 'We need each other to stay sober': How some Sask. addictions programs are adapting as COVID-19 spreads
    News
    CBC

    'We need each other to stay sober': How some Sask. addictions programs are adapting as COVID-19 spreads

    As businesses and public spaces close their doors for the time being, the places that house addiction recovery groups are closing too. For now, most services have had to adapt by moving online.Peter has been a part of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) for eight years. He helped the organization migrate online and facilitates meetings. Online resources have existed for some time, but it is unprecedented for AA to hold all of its meetings virtually. "It's different but it's been pretty awesome to be able to connect and see people's faces and hear them share their stories," Peter said. AA has been around since 1935 — only four years before the second World War began — so the organization has had to adapt before. "AA survived its way through that and other things over time... We need each other to stay sober and we need that contact, just right now that can't be in a physical, face-to-face form."In the age of COVID-19, people are stressed and could be experiencing major changes to routines. It's hard enough for anyone, but people dealing with addiction could be especially negatively affected, said Peter. "That can definitely throw us for a loop," he said. "Quickly getting meetings up and going so that people can get into a routine of, you know, 'these are the times each week that I went to meetings and now I can do that in a different way.'"Peter said he believes in the strength of the bonds that are created in programs like this and he is sure everyone will have learned a lot to share when they can all be together in person again. The same lifeboatConnection is crucial to recovery, according to longtime addictions counsellor Rand Teed — himself a person in long term recovery."One of the key ingredients of a successful recovery is getting connected to a group of people who are on the same path as you are," Teed said. "Meeting as a group puts people in the same lifeboat."Teed said it's fortunate this is happening in an age where there is so much technology available. The theme of his meeting on Friday was acceptance. Things aren't always going to be what you want them to be, he said."We have to learn how to adapt ourselves to an evolving world," Teed said. Dr. Peter Butt, an addictions consultant based in Saskatoon, said that on one hand, this period could be very difficult for someone in recovery, but that it really depends on the person."On the other hand, there are people in recovery that live very, very deliberately and are very aware of some of the risks and challenges out there," he said. "They've been to hell and back. They've put together a life that's pretty durable and they're pillars within their communities."Butt said this could also be a great opportunity for people in recovery to add to their toolbox, in terms of go-to recovery resources."This is an opportunity for people... to go online if they have access and explore the wealth of material that's out there in very different types of online recovery communities," he said.If you're struggling with addictions in this time, here are some resources you can access:

  • This Windsor restaurant is helping families eat healthy during COVID-19
    News
    CBC

    This Windsor restaurant is helping families eat healthy during COVID-19

    The Grand Cantina in Ford City has shifted from a dine-in restaurant to a take-out menu, including dozens of items on offer for families who need healthy meals. Chef John Alvarez said it's been difficult for restaurants across Windsor-Essex ever since dine-in eateries were ordered to close or switch to take-out options to prevent the spread of coronavirus. "Times being tough as it is, as a small business owner we had to layoff 22 of our staff, so we're running on a skeleton crew of eight people," said Alvarez, who co-owns the Grand Cantina taqueria and F&B Walkerville restaurant alongside chef Rosemary Woods.Both Alvarez and Woods have been delivering food themselves as they continue to look for ways to offer meals for people to buy, so they can keep staff employed."We're trying to stay alive as long as we can, with what we got," Alvarez said. Free, healthy meals for familiesIn addition to take-out, the Grand Cantina is also offering dozens of meals to families that might be having a hard time making ends meet because of the current pandemic. "We're really trying to stretch out as much as we can to serve the community," said Alvarez.Alvarez and the team have been able to chop up fresh salads, soups and roasted vegetables with quinoa because of donations from places like Caesars Windsor, St. Clair College and Fresh Start Foods Canada.He thinks each package could feed a family of four, with 40 of them ready to send out on Tuesday. "It's about trying to feed people who need help," said Alvarez, who has given some of the meals away to people in Ford City. "We're going to try to keep going as much as we can, especially with donations from other chefs, other companies, just trying feed whoever needs it."New take-out optionAlvarez said they still operate as a business and are encouraged by people who have continued to support them by calling in orders for pick-up and drop-off. Watch chef John Alvarez talk about operating a restaurant during the COVID-19 pandemic:"Even today we're really busy taking orders for dinner," said Alvarez, who has been working nearly two weeks straight, 14 hours a day alongside co-owner Woods. "They're kind of shocked that I was making deliveries, but I'm doing what I can," he said. "It's about helping each other out at this time."

  • Should you snitch on your neighbours for flouting physical distancing rules? Here's some advice
    News
    CBC

    Should you snitch on your neighbours for flouting physical distancing rules? Here's some advice

    Removed from the current context, it sounds like a Cold War-era story from behind the Iron Curtain: a ban on gatherings, the possibility that police might enforce that ban with arrests, members of the public ratting each other out.But during the COVID-19 lockdown, Quebecers, like billions around the world, are dealing with a reality defined by rules that prohibit basic human social behaviour."In many cases, we are suspicious when the government restricts individual freedoms," said Jocelyn Maclure, a professor of philosophy at Université Laval. But in extreme situations, attitudes can change."The fact that there's a wide social consensus on social distancing measures and confinement and so on — it seems people understand the need for these restrictions."But navigating these restrictions remains a complex, stressful task. Quebecers are having to find ways to abide by strict rules and how to deal with people who break them.There is no shortage of examples of people ignoring the rules. In Sherbrooke on Thursday, police broke up a student party at a private residence, dispersed a gathering of six people in a park, and shut down three non-essential businesses that remained open.In Gatineau, police stopped a gathering in an apartment Wednesday that cost its hosts $1,200 in fines.After the decree against indoor and outdoor gatherings was made public last Saturday, Montreal police received more than 200 calls in less than two days, said SPVM Inspector André Durocher. The provincial police say they have also received calls about people gathering in groups.Do you snitch on your neighbours if they have a gathering?Even now, reporting people to the police "should not be taken lightly," said Maclure, who is also the president of Quebec's commission on ethics in science and technology. But in the coronavirus situation, he said, "the stakes are very high."(Note: if a situation does warrant calling the police, they are pleading with people not to call 911, but to contact their local police station.)Montreal police haven't issued any fines or made arrests, Durocher said, and they have no intention of forming "a squad to monitor social distancing measures." He said most people seem to understand that the crisis requires a collective effort."For this to be over, everybody has a responsibility," said Durocher. If the public does its part, that will "make it easier on authorities to concentrate on other issues," rather than "telling people that they should be respecting" distancing rules.Maintaining 'good faith among neighbours'Where it can sometimes break down is where there's uncertainty.People have reported on social media that they've been abused and shamed for being out with their children. Vincent Marissal, the Québec Solidaire MNA for Rosemont, said his four kids were confronted — from a safe distance, but confronted all the same."The four of them went out to get some fresh air," Marissal said. "They were scolded by a lady, who told them they were breaking the law and threatened to call the police. My 17-year-old daughter had to explain to her that they were siblings."In an email to CBC, Daniel Weinstock, a philosopher and professor at McGill's faculty of law, said it seems reasonable to call the police if there's clearly a party happening next door. But it's otherwise worth maintaining a "certain amount of good faith among our neighbors" and assuming small groups out walking together are part of a family."Informing against our neighbors is highly corrosive to social relations, in ways which may continue to have echoes after this crisis is over," Weinstock said."Bottom line: probably a good idea to 'snitch' only in clear, unambiguous cases."Maclure similarly advised that — except in cases like parties that show clear disregard for the well-being of others — calling the authorities should be a last resort."I would surely try to talk to them first — from a distance, of course."Stepping up is crucialDoing that may also seem challenging. Nancy Kosik, an etiquette and protocol consultant, said you should be polite, assertive and ensure your body language is friendly. Don't yell from your car. Maintain an appropriate distance, and maintain a positive tone.You should greet the group politely, Kosik said, and then say something like, "I don't know if you've heard, but the government is urging us to speak up if we see people putting themselves at risk. I'm asking you to please wrap up and go home for obvious reasons, even if you're feeling fine."Once you've said your piece, Kosik said, stay there. "Don't just leave. See them disassemble their group. Reinforce that you mean what you say."It's a strange time, Kosik acknowledged, but that makes it all the more crucial that people step up and intervene."The more people who show that they're speaking up, the more people will understand how important this is," she said."The more we do our part and are effective in doing it in a way that does not cause confrontation, the sooner we can get back to our normal lives."

  • How the coronavirus pandemic can affect someone with an eating disorder
    Global News

    How the coronavirus pandemic can affect someone with an eating disorder

    There are concerns about how the COVID-19 pandemic will affect people both mentally and physically, since people are being asked to self-isolate and gyms are closed globally. But how is this pandemic affecting people with eating disorders?

  • Northeastern N.B. has no COVID-19 cases, but province won't say how many tested
    News
    CBC

    Northeastern N.B. has no COVID-19 cases, but province won't say how many tested

    Cases of COVID-19 in New Brunswick continue to climb but so far none have been reported in the northeastern corner of the province — a curiosity starting to raise questions among residents about how much testing the province has done in the area."The question people are beginning to ask is are they doing enough testing here in our region," said Tracadie-Sheila MLA Keith Chiasson."That's probably the concern of people. Is testing being done and are we missing people that might have coronavirus?"New Brunswick had 2,064 test results recorded as of Friday and 45 of those have been positively diagnosed with COVID - 19. But so far not a single case has been found in Miramichi, Bathurst, Tracadie, Shippagan, Caraquet, or dozens of other communities that make up health zones 6 and 7 in northeastern New Brunswick.About 120,000 people live in the area and, although the zero infection rate sounds like good news, it is impossible to know how aggressively the province has been hunting for the virus in those communities.No regional testing information has been released by the province despite multiple requests it be provided.Miramichi is the largest community in the area with no positive cases reported yet, and Mayor Adam Lordon said he would like more information about what is happening."I would hope they will release a regional breakdown of testing," Lordon said. "We haven't seen that information and I'd certainly be curious to see it." Saskatchewan is currently the only province publishing data on where tests in the province are done and efforts to have New Brunswick supply similar information have gone nowhere.On Friday, New Brunswick's chief medical officer of health, Dr. Jennifer Russell, appeared to confirm testing has been uneven around the province but wouldn't pinpoint what the differences are, saying only some areas have had more recent travellers than others and they have been a testing priority."If you look at all the regions in the province and you think, 'Well, if we're doing less tests here or there, then it means that our efforts are not, we're not putting in maximum effort or we're not putting in the right kind of effort,'" she said."It's very important to test the right people for the right reasons at the right time."But beyond vague references to regional differences in testing for the virus, the province has resisted providing firm numbers.'I will talk to my team about this'Last Monday, all questions about regional testing were referred to the two regional health authorities, neither of which provided information after being contacted.On Wednesday, Russell told reporters she would look into whether regional testing numbers could be supplied but none were.  On Friday, she was asked about it again and again said she would look into it."I think the last time it was asked I thought I would try to see if we could get the numbers on tests in each region," said Russell."I will talk to my team about this."  New Brunswick has been trailing other provinces in the amount of testing it has done for the virus overall. Lordon does want to see what has been done in his area but is more concerned testing efforts improve in the days ahead."Hopefully [regional numbers] will be sent out, but we know that generally that the test numbers have been low and what I'm interested in is more tests happening here in Miramichi and across the province."

  • Regions brace to fight rising flood waters and cases of COVID-19
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Regions brace to fight rising flood waters and cases of COVID-19

    OTTAWA — The last couple of years have taken on a biblical tone in the rural Pontiac region of Quebec. The small community of about 6,000 has recovered from five natural disasters in just two years. Floods and microbursts have wiped out homes, roads and culverts. Last year's tornado was the cherry on the cake."Our little municipality has become experts at managing crises," said Mayor Joanne Labadie.But nothing could prepare them for the possibility of fighting another flood with a global pandemic on their doorstep, she said.Still, they're getting ready as best they can."The challenges of managing a flood with the complexities of COVID-19, it’s daunting," she said.Pontiac is one of dozens of flood-prone regions bracing for the possibility of rising waters amid the COVID-19 crisis.Not far across the provincial border, Pontiac's metropolitan neighbours in Ottawa are facing the same worries.While a flood watch is in effect for some low-lying areas in the region, the overall forecasts have so far been favourable.Still, officials warn they need to be prepared for the worst since forecasts can change quickly.The highly contagious COVID-19 poses serious challenges for disaster response, Labadie said.Traditional evacuation centres, for example, are out of the question because of the need to separate people from each other."The current pandemic is changing the way we do business, and managing a possible spring flood will be no exception," Quebec Public Security Minister Genevieve Guilbault said in a statement.She warned that due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the province will not be able to open emergency shelters as it did last year when thousands were forced from their homes.Last year in the Pontiac, a seniors home needed to be evacuated because of the rising waters, and the municipality is warning people they need to find a safe alternative in case it happens again.Ottawa relied on 15,000 volunteers to fill and place sandbags to protect homes and stop the water from washing ashore last year.But public health directives to keep a distance from one another to stop the spread of COVID-19 has made that prospect nearly impossible."It's been very challenging for us to plan and move forward," Ottawa city manager Steve Kanellakos told councillors at a meeting last week.The city has created separate COVID-19 and flood task forces to prepare, and best practices for fighting surging waters are being adapted to reflect public health recommendations. Provinces where non-essential services have shut down might also need to re-evaluate plans to include gravel and sand suppliers in the event of a flood.Premiers in Manitoba and New Brunswick, two provinces with historically flood prone regions, say they're cautiously optimistic about the latest flood forecasts."We're watching it very closely and currently we've had melting conditions that are like a typical March. We hope that continues," New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs said last week."We will be prepared to deal with a flood situation."That might mean calling in the military, he said.Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan said the military is trying to keep its members healthy so they can respond to disasters if needed."We're looking even two, three, four steps ahead to making sure that we have troops prepared," Sajjan said earlier this month. In Pontiac, Labadie is also looking to the future, beyond COVID-19 and flood season to the next possible disaster."All we can do is hope we don't have a drought this year."This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 28, 2020.Laura Osman, The Canadian Press

  • Families will have to wait a lot longer to deliver first hugs to newborns
    News
    CBC

    Families will have to wait a lot longer to deliver first hugs to newborns

    As her March 8 due date approached, Mikayla Clowater had sweet visions of her parents meeting her first-born child for the first time. The baby is the first grandchild on both sides of the family, so excitement was mounting. But, like a lot of things in the last couple of weeks, that fairytale imagining of the introduction was sidelined by COVID-19 precautions. It didn't happen with an hours-old newborn in the quiet comfort of a hospital room. There were no snuggles or kisses; no photos of proud grandparents beaming at the camera while holding baby Nico in their arms.  They haven't been able to hold him. Mom hasn't been able to give me a hug or anything. \- Mikayla Clowater Instead, the introduction happened in a driveway on the way home from the hospital. Nico remained in his car seat, covered with a hat and a blanket, and only his sleeping face visible to Clowater's parents —  all from a safe distance of two metres, of course. "That's not really how you picture anyone meeting your new baby," said Clowater, by phone from her home in Hanwell, just southwest of Fredericton."You could hardly even see his eyes or anything. We were lucky it was a mild day so we could sit him out there for a couple minutes, but it was still stressful and emotional just having that as their first meeting with him."They haven't been able to hold him. Mom hasn't been able to give me a hug or anything."She worries that if things last as long as health officials are warning, her family may not get to meet Nico until his first birthday. "For the next undetermined amount of time, I will only have 'porch visits,' where we maintain six feet or more distance, or video chats," said Clowater. "I am thankful that our family members are respecting our decisions."As Clowater wrote recently on Facebook, "No one expects to have a baby in the midst of a pandemic."In addition to the usual concerns of a new mom, "I now have the loss of control of the virus as well to work through."Clowater and her husband, Josh, started to get a sense that things wouldn't be business as usual when they went to the Chalmers hospital in Fredericton on March 14 to be induced.The couple were warned that only two family members would be allowed to stay with her, but by the time she went into labour on the afternoon of the 16th, that was down to one. All Horizon Health hospitals have barred visitors or limited the number allowed for certain patients to one.After Nico arrived at 11:47 that night — weighing in at eight pounds six ounces — Clowater kept asking the doctors for advice about meeting family and friends. She kept asking the question, hoping for a more positive response, but it was always the same."The bottom line was that no visitors was the safest option because they didn't want me or my husband getting sick and then having to care for a newborn, or getting the baby sick," said Clowater. "This meant that those special, sentimental moments everyone pictures with a new baby couldn't happen," she said. Looking ahead, Clowater worries about the impact of physical distancing on Nico. "If this virus goes on for as long as some predictions — some say 12 to 18 months or longer — and we have to continue social distancing, it's kind of cruel to think for a little baby and their development, that they only ever see or know or hear their parents."But she also knows that things could be worse. "I am thankful I am not in a situation where I cannot say goodbye to a dying loved one," Clowater said. "I would rather a delayed 'hello' than a missed 'goodbye.'"

  • Love in the time of coronavirus: How the pandemic is affecting relationships
    News
    CBC

    Love in the time of coronavirus: How the pandemic is affecting relationships

    Carolyn Alexander welcomed her Irish boyfriend Mark Casley to Winnipeg a couple of weeks ago — just before Manitoba identified its first cases of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19."We just went on the one first date when he got here and we've been living together ever since because of the quarantine," Alexander said.Around the world, relationships of every kind are being affected by COVID-19, for better or for worse. Some, like Alexander and Casley's, are rising to the occasion, while others are feeling extra tension.Casley moved to Winnipeg earlier than he planned, knowing flights would be cancelled and it would be difficult to travel.The couple's relationship got serious quickly, in part because they're both in their 50s and want a commitment, but also because they had to be in such close quarters.Alexander, who is the founder of Singles in the Peg, a platform for single Winnipeggers looking for love, said she and her boyfriend have been spending a lot of time playing board games and "enjoying the simpler things in life."The social isolation helped bring their relationship to the next level and they're talking about getting married in a few months, she said.That's the opposite of what's happening in some districts of Xi'an, the capital of northwest China's Shaanxi province.Marriage registration offices in the city saw unprecedented numbers of applications for divorce after the region was quarantined earlier this month, a Chinese state-run newspaper The Global Times reported."We, as a whole world, a global community, are experiencing stress related to the COVID-19 virus, and so that's going to impact every relationship," said Carolyn Klassen, a marriage and family therapist at Conexus Counselling in Winnipeg.There are many stressors associated with the pandemic, Klassen said."We cannot see the virus. We cannot yell at it, and so the danger is that we're going to take it out on each other because it's not just about the fear of getting the virus," she said. "It's also the fear of lost income, what the future's going to be, how long this is going to last. There's so many layers of legitimate stress."For some, being apart from loved ones is a source of stress.Kristin Millar is living apart from her partner for two weeks because she is immunocompromised following a heart transplant, and his two children were exposed to people who travelled internationally."Being separated from your home or a really important support person is really difficult. It's really challenging. You want to be around the person who provides the greatest support or comfort," she said.Millar is staying with her parents in Winnipeg for two weeks to ensure she's safe. In the meantime, she and her partner are communicating over the phone.In spite of everything, Millar feels "really, really lucky" to be able to work from home and to have the support of her family and partner.Relationship adviceKlassen said she's not seeing more clients during the pandemic because many people are too concerned about their financial situation to pay for counselling, but she's heard from many people in the community that they're struggling with their relationships given their new reality."We are wired for connection. We need each other and yet we have to figure out how to navigate these waters and when there's stress, one of the ways we cope with that stress is we take it out on the people close to us," she saidThere are better ways to cope, she said, starting with recognizing we're in a brand new situation and aren't going to be very good at it at first."When you learn to ride a bike, when you start a new job, there's always a period of orientation, a period of recognizing that you're not going to be very efficient and very effective," Klassen said."I think we have to give ourselves permission to say this is going to take some time to figure out, because none of us have ever done this before."Klassen said people in relationships — platonic or otherwise — need to look inward to see what they need to be healthy and happy, and then communicate that effectively to others.She also recommends limiting screen time."I think one of the challenges is to figure out how to get off screens and be with each other in ways that might feel kind of weird," she said. "Some of us are pulling up board games for the first time in years and it's weird, and yet it actually is also really good."Online-only datingWhile some are struggling with their relationships or working on trying to strengthen them, others are looking for new people online.Alexander, who normally hosts in-person speed dating events in her capacity as owner of Singles in the Peg, has moved them online in light of the pandemic."Don't let COVID-19 stop you from finding the love of your life, because there's still avenues that you still can," she said.If speed dating isn't your style, there are apps geared toward finding new friends or dates.Last year, the dating app Bumble came out with the option to video chat with matches, which is coming in handy now for people wanting to take the next step with someone they're interested in while maintaining physical distance.Another dating app, Hinge, is coming up with a number of different options for people who can't see each other but want to spend time together. Hinge suggests cooking the same meal, ordering your favourite food to the other person's house, playing games and giving each other tours of one another's homes — all over video chat.Klassen sees the pandemic as an opportunity for people to focus on the relationships that matter."While this might be a stressful time, it also, I think, has the potential to transform relationships for good. We can make lemonade out of lemons."

  • 'I can't stay home, I'm a trucker': Life on the road during COVID-19
    News
    CBC

    'I can't stay home, I'm a trucker': Life on the road during COVID-19

    Truck drivers are still hauling loads across Canada and the U.S., but with strict measures in place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, life is far from normal.Steven Kastrantas has been driving a truck for the past 14 years, and he's never experienced anything like what he's going through now."It's not easy. It's not easy," he said.""All we have to do in the truck is talk on the phone or think, and I've started to think in extremes."Saint-Eustache is home for Kastrantas, but he's more often on the road. This week, he travelled to Tennessee and back, loaded with paper.For the drivers still hauling loads through the hard-hit U.S., there is no stopping for a restaurant meal or a washroom break."No food, no bathroom, no shower," Kastrantas says."I've got a little barbecue that I can plug into my truck, so I can cook outside."Kastrantas also bought a portable toilet, essentially a children's potty, that he keeps in the cab of the truck.Another trucker, Max De Kiewit, just drove a load of auto parts to Laredo, Texas, coming back to Canada laden with pharmaceuticals. He's heading back out, this time to Huntsville, Ala., on Sunday. "The problem right now is all the restaurants are closed, so it's hard to get food," he said."You can't take a truck through the drive-thru. But more and more, restaurants will take your order and take it out to you."Jeremy Dyckson, who lives in Moose Jaw, Sask., hauls food and cleaning products across Canada, including to Montreal.He says in Canada, the truck stops are mainly open, but some fast-food places have closed their counter service, and the trucks are too big for the drive-thru lane.Often, if you walk up to the drive-thru, as he witnessed at a service area near Montreal, you won't be served, he says."Trucker after trucker was walking back empty-handed, and I felt so sorry for them," Dyckson saidOne thing he notices — the roads are free and clear."There's no traffic!" he said. "I can drive in and out of Toronto in 20 minutes, which usually takes me two hours."Missing familyKastrantas says as a trucker, he's often away from his kids, but with the pandemic, it's even worse."I'm separated, so I have two kids that I haven't seen in almost three weeks," he said.Kastrantas also has a girlfriend who he doesn't live with, and he hasn't seen her, either."It's very hard on them."On Facebook, truck drivers are adding the banner 'I can't stay home, I'm a trucker' to their profile pictures.Dyckson says he does goes home to his family, but he is cautious on the road and interacts directly with no one."If I get sick, I'll have to go home and self-isolate, because I don't want to get my family sick," he said.Normal work procedures have changed, too. Instead of interacting with people when unloading, drivers stay in their trucks and exchange paperwork through the window.Border crossingsAs an essential service, truck drivers continue to cross back and forth over the Canadian and American border.Kastrantas says how well that goes depends on which border crossing he uses.Two weeks ago, in Windsor, Ont., the border agent didn't even take his passport, he said, just asking him his birth date and where he was headed."When you go to the States, they ask you where you're heading, what the load is and if you've gone overseas in the last 30 days," said Kastrantas."In Canada, they just ask, 'How're you doing?' and hand you a paper explaining quarantine rules."De Kiewit says nobody asks if he's feeling sick when he crosses the border."They ask you where you've been, what are you hauling, and have a good day."Kastrantas says his job is more important than ever, even if he sometimes gets scared."I have to be strong, I'll get through it, and I want to keep going because people have got to eat."

  • Souls Harbour and Salvation Army still providing meals during pandemic
    News
    CBC

    Souls Harbour and Salvation Army still providing meals during pandemic

    Souls Harbour Rescue Mission is not celebrating its 30th year in operation but the Regina non-profit is still serving meals and providing a place to sleep for those in need, despite the strain the COVID-19 pandemic has placed on society.Executive Director Joe Miller said the organization has had to lay off a staff member and limit volunteering to a steady crew of two or three people to feed about 250 people daily."We're doing things a little differently but we're still serving the public as best as we can," Miller said on Friday."We're still getting those healthy, nutritious meals. The only difference is that things are slower than what they were before," he added.Meals are no longer served in a communal setting with hundreds of hungry guests together in a room. Now, staff members are providing takeout meals to people on an individual basis, Miller said.Someone enters a room, then they grab something to eat, a drink and maybe an informational pamphlet before leaving. Then, the next person comes in. Staff are about 2½ metres away, behind a table at all times.Physical distancing is necessary to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus and has forced changes to food programs at the Salvation Army as well."It changes the dynamic, of course, because people come to the meal program not only for the food, but also for the socialization," Maj. Mike Hoeft, area commander for the Salvation Army in the province, said Friday evening.He said there hasn't been a noticeable decline in the number of people who are dropping by for a meal, if and when it's available. Food is now being dstributed out of the Salvation Army's doorway, in some cases. Hoeft said the organization is trying to operate as efficiently as possible and all staff in the province are still working, even in the thrift stores, which are currently shut down.The Salvation Army's food banks have made modifications for clients, such as shifting to an appointment-based approach where a client calls or goes into the food bank as an individual."Food banks, meal programs, shelters and girls' homes — all of those things — the long-term care, they're all operating," Hoeft added.The Salvation Army, Souls Harbour Rescue Mission and Riverside Mission in Moose Jaw have all stopped accepting clothing donations.Food donations to Souls Harbour can be arranged by emailing Bob Fallon in Regina. Donations to Riverside Mission can be arranged by contacting Rachel Mullens.

  • Experts weigh in on best handling of groceries during COVID-19 pandemic
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Experts weigh in on best handling of groceries during COVID-19 pandemic

    A routine trip to the grocery store can be complicated by a boatload of questions in the age of COVID-19.The pandemic has left many shoppers wondering whether they need to sanitize their cardboard cereal boxes or plastic yogurt containers before unloading their grocery bags.But several experts say washing your hands is more important than wiping down every item you put in the fridge.Research published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests the virus can live for up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to three days on plastic.Experts say the risk of consumers catching the novel coronavirus from picking up items in the grocery aisle appears to be quite low, but it's too early to draw definitive conclusions.They said it's possible that someone with COVID-19 could cough, sneeze or touch an item with contaminated hands before it's brought home by another shopper. But the chances of that scenario are pretty slim."I think the risk of actually having the coronavirus on your stuff is actually pretty low," said Jeff Kwong, the associate director of the Centre for Vaccine Preventable Diseases at the University of Toronto."I think wiping it all down is just an extra precaution and then just washing your hands afterwards is probably sufficient."University of Guelph food science professor Keith Warriner agreed that the risk of the novel coronavirus lingering on your packaged groceries is low.Since research on the virus is still emerging, Warriner said it may be wise to take some simple precautions. "Washing your hands before you touch anything," he said. "Wash anything before you eat it."But how far should one go in sanitizing their foodstuffs? Should granola bar boxes be given a quick wipe? What about that plastic container of parmesan cheese?Jennifer Ronholm, an assistant professor in the faculty of agricultural and environmental sciences at McGill University, felt grocery worries were of "minimal concern" from a public health perspective.But if extra cleaning or disinfecting helps provide peace of mind — then go for it, she said."If you were very worried about it, it's not going to hurt you to wipe your food down when you get home," said Ronholm."But again, the chances are very minimal."Lawrence Goodridge, a food safety professor at the University of Guelph, said he doesn't think the cleaning of plastic or cardboard items from the grocery store is really necessary."Research studies tend not to mimic what happens in everyday life," he said. "I think the consumers and the general public are worried because there's this image out there that those cereal boxes are literally just covered all over the surface with the virus. Well that's not the case."When bringing groceries inside, other suggested precautions include disinfecting the countertop before and after unloading. One no-no, Goodridge said, was wearing gloves during the process."Gloves tend to give people a false sense of security," he said. "Because they think that they're wearing gloves that anything the virus can't get on to their hands. But gloves themselves can become dirty and spread things."Once a product is brought home, consumers have control from there, he said. And if ever in doubt, grab the soap and turn on the tap."You wash your hands when you come in, you wash your hands after you've handled it, you wash your hands before you eat, prepare food, or do anything to your face that you want to do and I think you should be safe then."This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 28, 2020.Follow @GregoryStrongCP on Twitter.Gregory Strong, The Canadian Press

  • Economic impact of COVID-19 pandemic on P.E.I. 'a whole new world'
    News
    CBC

    Economic impact of COVID-19 pandemic on P.E.I. 'a whole new world'

    Efforts to slow the spread of COVID-19 on P.E.I. are certain to have an enormous economic impact, but trying to get a handle on how bad it will be is perhaps an equally large challenge.There are a lot of unknowns, said Fred Bergman, senior policy analyst at the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council. How much can the virus be contained, and how long will it take to develop a vaccine so that people feel comfortable about going back to work are two key ones.A further issue is the lack of past examples.There are some lessons from the impact of SARS and H1N1, but those were much smaller events. You have to go back a century to the Spanish flu for something similar to COVID-19. But there is not much data available from those times, said Bergman, and even if there was that early-20th-century economy bears little resemblance to today's."It's very difficult to speculate on," said Bergman."It's a whole new world for us on that front and so it does present a number of challenges."APEC has set aside much of the work it normally does to try to make sense of what the crisis is doing to the economy in Atlantic Canada, he said.Some of P.E.I.'s biggest industries affectedOne primary industry where the impact was large and immediate is tourism.The shoulder season is still some weeks away, so significant revenue from the industry has not started to flow yet — but under current public health restrictions, there is no way for the season to start.Even if restaurant dining rooms were open, all unnecessary travel to P.E.I. is prohibited.And while this is not the best time of year for Island restaurants, it is not insignificant. Last year restaurant revenue in the second quarter, April through June, was a little over $70 million. "There's a good chance that a lot of that will be lost sales due to those closures," said Bergman. "You're probably talking about upwards of $55 million in lost sales."Bergman said he has talked with Restaurants Canada, and there is concern that the bounce back when restaurants do reopen could be slow."We're now all cooking at home more, and we're all staying at home more, and we're getting kind of used to that," he said.Add to that how many Canadians are seeing incomes fall in the pandemic, or their savings fall in value as the stock market drops. Recovery from that will not be quick, and luxury items like restaurant meals may have to wait that much longer.Triple threat to government financesThe industry that employs the most people on P.E.I. is also largely shut down: retail.The latest jobs report from Statistics Canada, for February,  showed 11,500 Islanders working in wholesale and retail. With only essential services, largely grocery and pharmacies, remaining open, many of those would now be laid off.Those layoffs affect the provincial government in three ways. * Reduced collection of HST from retail sales. * Reduced income tax from laid off workers. * The necessity to create incentive programs to support laid off workers and closed businesses.Premier Dennis King has already said a projected surplus budget plan that was in the works early this month is now off the table. With attacks on both the revenue and expenditure side, the deficit is likely to be large.But Bergman said this is no time to be worrying about the deficit."It's important to support households, Canadian households and Canadian businesses, in the manner that the federal government and provinces are doing," he said."How important is deficit and debt … at this time versus keeping our households whole and keeping our businesses whole?"If families and business fall into bankruptcy, recovery on the other side of the crisis will be very slow, he said. If when the crisis ends people have money to spend and there are businesses ready to sell them things, the chance of a quick bounce back and return to growth will be far better.More from CBC P.E.I.

  • COVID-19 financial questions: stock market
    Global News

    COVID-19 financial questions: stock market

    Global News Winnipeg continues to take a closer look at some questions you may have when it comes to your financial stability right now. Our Malika Karim takes a look at the stock market.

  • Dozens of retired N.S. doctors looking to practise again for COVID-19
    News
    CBC

    Dozens of retired N.S. doctors looking to practise again for COVID-19

    Dr. Chris Randall is ready to come out of retirement for the second time in less than three years. This time, it's to help his mostly younger colleagues in Nova Scotia face the COVID-19 pandemic.The 62-year-old's paperwork is done and he's just waiting for the call. Although he's unclear what work he will be doing, Randall is approaching it with the confidence that comes with a long and varied medical career."When HIV started back in the '80s, we knew nothing about it," he said. "I had no training about that.""And yet I had cases back in Newfoundland and didn't know what the risks were to myself. A lot wasn't known. It's no different. I just use that as one example, but there are a multitude of examples like that throughout my career."Randall, who mostly practised in Yarmouth, N.S., originally retired in 2015, but reinstated his license to practise in 2018 when the province was looking for family doctors to cover off practices for physicians on leave.Health officials preparing for the arrival of COVID-19 to Nova Scotia called Randall this month to ask if he'd be willing to lend a hand if needed."Whatever role they want for me, I'm here to do it," he said.Although he hasn't been "deployed," Randall has offered to work in what will be called secondary assessment units, areas set aside for people suspected of having the virus and confirmed cases.People over the age of 60 are at a higher risk of getting seriously ill from the virus, but Randall, who considers himself a fit 62-year-old, doesn't believe he's putting himself at risk.And he's not the only doctor considering practising again. According to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia, 52 doctors from across Nova Scotia have asked about having their licences reactivated.Doctors who retire rarely come out of retirement to practise again, said Gus Grant, the college's registrar. But he said he's not shocked to see so many of his colleagues exploring that possibility."There's rarely a day in my life that I'm not proud to be part of the medical profession," said Grant."The pandemic has given rise to a call and physicians, by their very nature, even when they're retired, are hardwired to want to help."In anticipation, the college has fast-tracked the licensing process for doctors who want to practise again."These retired physicians are known to us, their history is known to us, their training is known to us, their competence and character is known to us, so it's an extremely quick process," said Grant.Only 7 licences reissued so far in N.S.Despite that, to date, the college has reissued only seven licenses. Grant is confident more will be ready soon.The national organization that provides doctors with malpractice protection has also made it a priority to handle cases involving doctors who want to return to service.Todd Watkins, managing director of physician services for the Canadian Medical Protective Association, said 326 doctors have applied so far this month to have their protection reinstated. Of those doctors, 51 are from Nova Scotia."That's tremendously out of the normal," said Watkins.He said the association has offered protection to the 51 Nova Scotian doctors who have requested it.The association saw a number of physicians return to service during the SARS outbreak in 2003, but Watkins characterized that as "a bit of a blip" in comparison to the number of doctors coming forward in recent weeks.MORE TOP STORIES