Charlie Sheen Says He 'Feels Good' After Getting Sober: 'It Had to Be Done'

Aurelie Corinthios
Charlie Sheen Says He 'Feels Good' After Getting Sober: 'It Had to Be Done'

Charlie Sheen says he’s in a good place.

The former Two and a Half Men star — who has remained relatively under the radar since revealing his HIV-positive diagnosis in 2015 — revealed last month that he was celebrating one year of sobriety.

Speaking to Extra at the California Strong Celebrity Softball Game in Malibu on Sunday, Sheen, 53, addressed his decision to go public with his journey, saying: “That was good, yes, indeed — had to be done.”

“I feel good,” he added.

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Speaking to PEOPLE and other reporters at the event, Sheen revealed he had one other important goal in 2019: to quit smoking.

“I did the resolutions before the new year showed up, but I have to work on the smoking thing — that’s not good,” he said.

Sheen, a father of five, added that he’s proud of the progress he’s made so far.

“I try not to think too far down the line, but I’m excited to just have made some changes to give myself a shot and do some cool things professionally,” he said. “I’m proud of finally being consistent and reliable and noble. If things are insane over there or wherever it happens, the kids know that a return to dad is very organized and nurturing.”

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Sheen has long battled substance abuse. In January 2016, he opened up to Dr. Mehmet Oz about his past attempts to quit drinking, joking that he must have tried to say no to the bottle “about 2,000” times over the years.

“There was a stretch where I didn’t drink for 11 years. No cocaine, no booze for 11 years,” he said. “So I know that I have that in me.”

He said he fell off the wagon after receiving his HIV diagnosis.

“It was to suffocate the anxiety and what my life was going to become with this condition and getting so numb I didn’t think about it,” he said. “It was the only tool I had at the time, so I believed that would quell a lot of that angst. A lot of that fear. And it only made it worse.”