Charlottetown to try chicane for traffic calming

·1 min read
The redevelopment of Harley Street will include curbs and sidewalks. (Sheehan Desjardins/CBC - image credit)
The redevelopment of Harley Street will include curbs and sidewalks. (Sheehan Desjardins/CBC - image credit)

Charlottetown will get its first chicane this summer, during a full redevelopment of Harley Street.

A chicane is an S-curve in a street that forces vehicles to slow down to navigate it. The street will also sometimes narrow at the chicane.

Charlottetown public works manager Scott Adams described Harley Street as a prime candidate for a chicane.

"It connects two busy streets, both Mount Edward Road and St. Peters Road, so it does tend to be a cut-through road," said Adams.

Sheehan Desjardins/CBC
Sheehan Desjardins/CBC

Some drivers are speeding along the street, he said, and there is just more traffic than there should be on the residential street.

"We want to keep drivers who are trying to get from Point A to Point B on those roads that are designed to handle that traffic," he said.

The chicane serves two purposes: to slow traffic down and deter drivers from using the street at all, making it less appealing as a shortcut.

Chicanes have a few advantages over speed bumps. Speed bumps can be noisy for people living close to them, and they are seasonal. Charlottetown uses portable speed bumps that are taken up in the winter for snow-clearing purposes.

The timing is right for Harley Street because the city is reconstructing the whole streetscape, replacing water and sewer lines, repaving and installing curbs and sidewalks.

Work will begin on the street this month, and will take 12 to 16 weeks to complete.

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