Chinese seniors saved from eviction after province steps in to buy building

·2 min read
Upgrades are planned for the Grace Seniors Home in Vancouver. Social service agency S.U.C.C.E.S.S. is expected to take over operations on June 15. (Ben Nelms/CBC - image credit)
Upgrades are planned for the Grace Seniors Home in Vancouver. Social service agency S.U.C.C.E.S.S. is expected to take over operations on June 15. (Ben Nelms/CBC - image credit)

The provincial government has stepped in to buy an assisted living home for Chinese seniors after dozens of elderly residents were told they had to move out by the end of May because of a pending sale to a different party.

Housing Minister David Eby said Grace Seniors Home at 333 East Pender St. in Vancouver's Chinatown will remain as a seniors' housing facility with Chinese cultural supports operated by social services agency S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

"This housing is now protected for those seniors, and they don't have to go anywhere," said Eby.

The private owners of the building had it on the market for some time before reaching a sales agreement with non-profit Lu'ma Native Housing Society, with funding from B.C. Housing, earlier this year.

Housing Minister David Eby said Grace Seniors Home at 333 East Pender St. in Vancouver's Chinatown will remain as a seniors housing facility with Chinese cultural supports operated by social services agency S.U.C.C.E.S.S.
Housing Minister David Eby said Grace Seniors Home at 333 East Pender St. in Vancouver's Chinatown will remain as a seniors housing facility with Chinese cultural supports operated by social services agency S.U.C.C.E.S.S.(Ben Nelms/CBC)

The Vancouver Sun first reported the sale of Grace Seniors Home after the 70 residents — some in their 90s — learned they were facing potential eviction by the original owners, even though Lu'ma later said they didn't have to move.

Eby said the Grace Home seniors had been through a lot because of the mixed messages.

"In the current environment of rising anti-Asian racism, a secure, safe and familiar residence for Chinese seniors is perhaps even more important," he said. "These seniors are reliant on the immediate community, as well as each other, for their health and well-being."

Eby said he was grateful to Lu'ma Native Housing Society for agreeing to assign the property sale to the province.

Upgrades are planned for the building and S.U.C.C.E.S.S. is expected to take over operations on June 15.