In church and in living rooms, N.L. says goodbye to Queen Elizabeth

·3 min read
Lt.-Gov. Judy Foote has been the Queen's representative in Newfoundland and Labrador for the past four years. (Ted Dillon/CBC - image credit)
Lt.-Gov. Judy Foote has been the Queen's representative in Newfoundland and Labrador for the past four years. (Ted Dillon/CBC - image credit)
Ted Dillon/CBC
Ted Dillon/CBC

Queen Elizabeth meant a lot to Newfoundland and Labrador, said her representative in the province at a ceremony in St. John's on Monday, a provincial day of mourning to mark the late monarch's death.

At the Anglican Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in downtown St. John's, Lt.-Gov. Judy Foote, the Queen's representative in the province for the past four years, said there has been an outpouring of grief since the Queen's death Sept. 8.

"It is obvious Her Majesty was not only respected and admired by many but indeed the late Queen was loved," said Foote.

"While with time memories will fade, undoubtedly the outpouring of emotion being witnessed throughout the world, feelings of love and respect for the Queen will remain."

Books of condolence have available in government offices for people to sign since the Queen's death, and Foote said the one at Government House has seen a steady stream of visitors leaving notes for the Royal Family.

"Her Majesty loved the Commonwealth, and the Commonwealth loved Her Majesty," said Foote.

Ted Dillon/CBC
Ted Dillon/CBC

Following Foote, Premier Andrew Furey said said it was an honour to pay tribute to the late Queen and offer condolences to the Royal Family.

"I hope we should all be so lucky to lead a long and meaningful life, to give others as much and as often as we can and to never lose our curiosity in all things," he said.

"Rest in well-earned peace, your Royal Highness. Newfoundland and Labrador will always carry you in our hearts."

A 21-gun salute followed on the grounds of the Queen's Battery on Signal Hill on Monday. Government offices and schools were closed for the day of mourning.

Respect, silence

Royal watcher Carla Conway sat quietly in her living room in St. John's on Monday, watching television coverage of the Queen's funeral and sipping tea.

Conway, who has been following the Royal Family for years, is a collector of royal memorabilia — she has dozens of pieces on display inside her home.

"It was very moving and it was also reminiscent of funerals for parents and grand parents, which it was," Conway said Monday.

"The respect and the silence that was outside with the masses of people was a very big part of it."

Ted Dillon/CBC
Ted Dillon/CBC

Conway said watching the funeral on television meant being a part of the ceremony in some small way. She said it was a show of respect for Elizabeth's 70-year reign as Queen.

"It's always been part of my life," said Conway. "It was amazing to watch."

Ted Dillon/CBC
Ted Dillon/CBC

She said the Queen's death marks a new chapter for her and for her collection, much of which came from her grandmother.

"It's still hard to believe because even though, intellectually, you knew a 96-year-old is an older individual, that day is still very shocking," said Conway.

"I'm so glad I was able to have the opportunity to watch the funeral and see it from the Abbey and hear the music and the significance of the music."

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