CIBT Education Group Inc. Reports Director Election Results

Newsfile Corp.

Vancouver, British Columbia--(Newsfile Corp. - February 14, 2020) - CIBT Education Group Inc. (TSX: MBA) (OTCQX: MBAIF) ("CIBT") reports the director election voting results from its annual general meeting held today. All of the director nominees, as listed in the management information circular dated December 23, 2019, were elected. Proxy voting as to each of the director nominees was as follows:


Votes in Favour Votes Withheld
Morris Chen 93.82% 6.18%
Toby Chu 93.72% 6.28%
Tony David 93.82% 6.18%
Derek Feng 93.82% 6.18%
May Hsu 93.84% 6.16%
Troy Rice 93.82% 6.18%
Shane Weir 93.72% 6.28%

 

Please see the report of voting results filed today under CIBT's profile on SEDAR for the results of the other matters voted on by shareholders at the meeting.

About CIBT Education Group:

CIBT Education Group Inc. is one of the largest education and student housing investment companies in Canada focused on the global education market since 1994. Listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and U.S OTCQX International, CIBT owns business and language colleges, student housing properties, recruitment centres and corporate offices at 45 locations in Canada and abroad. The total annual enrollment for the group exceeds 12,000 students. Its education providers include Sprott Shaw College (established in 1903), Sprott Shaw Language College, Vancouver International College and CIBT School of Business. Through these schools, CIBT offers business and management programs in healthcare, hotel management, language training, and over 150 career, language and vocational programs. CIBT owns Global Education City Holdings Inc. ("Global Education"), an investment holding and development company focused on developing education related real estate such as student hotels, serviced apartments and education centres. The total portfolio and development budget of projects under Global Education's GEC® brand is over C$1 billion. The various GEC® properties provide accommodations to over 1,500 students and other tenants. CIBT also owns Global Education Alliance ("GEA") and Irix Design Group ("Irix Design"). GEA recruits international students on behalf of many elite kindergartens, primary and secondary schools, colleges and universities in North America. Irix Design is a leading design and advertising company based in Vancouver, Canada. Visit us online and watch our corporate video at www.cibt.net.

Toby Chu
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer
CIBT Education Group Inc.

Investor Relations Contact:
1-604-871-9909 extension 318 or | Email:
info@cibt.net

To view the source version of this press release, please visit https://www.newsfilecorp.com/release/52478

  • PM calls off diplomatic visit to Caribbean amid ongoing rail stoppages
    News
    CBC

    PM calls off diplomatic visit to Caribbean amid ongoing rail stoppages

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau cancelled a trip to Barbados scheduled for Monday as Indigenous demonstrators and their supporters continue to halt train service across parts of the country.Trudeau planned to bring his pitch for a UN Security Council seat to a two-day gathering of leaders from across what is known as the Caribbean Community, or Caricom, but will send Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne instead."Following the government's ongoing efforts to address infrastructure disruptions across the country, the prime minister will convene the Incident Response Group tomorrow to discuss steps forward," the Prime Minister's Office said in a statement. The IRG is a group of cabinet members and high-level officials the prime minister leans on in times of crisis."Our priority remains the safety and security of all Canadians and the swift resolution of this issue to restore service across the rail system in accordance with the law," the statement said.Trudeau returned to Canada late Friday after spending a week in Ethiopia, Kuwait, Senegal and Germany and spent the weekend in private meetings, according to his public schedule.The decision comes amid mounting pressure from business leaders and politicians who want the government to take more of an active role in resolving the crisis, which some say is damaging the economy and could lead to shortages of propane and other consumer goods.Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller met for over nine hours with members of the Mohawk First Nation Saturday, saying only "modest progress" had been made in talks to end the main blockade near Belleville, Ont., which caused VIA Rail and CN Rail to cancel rail services.Trudeau's spokesperson Chantal Gagnon said earlier Sunday that the prime minister was in talks with federal cabinet ministers over the weekend. Gagnon said Trudeau spoke to Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, Transport Minister Marc Garneau, Public Safety Minister Bill Blair and Carolyn Bennett, the minister for Crown-Indigenous Relations.Gagnon also said Miller briefed Trudeau about his meeting Saturday with the Tyendinaga Mohawk, although she did not reveal what Miller told the prime minister.Government chooses dialogue over police interventionMiller said during an appearance on Radio-Canada's political talk show Les coulisses du pouvoir on Sunday that the unrest and its impact on the economy amounted to a "national crisis." He said he believes a peaceful resolution could be reached, and pointed to the Oka and Ipperwash crises as reasons why dialogue is preferable to police intervention."We lived through it 30 years ago, when people went in, when police went in, there was a death," said Miller. A police officer died during a police raid in 1990 when Mohawks at the Kahnawake reserve south of Montreal blocked the Mercier Bridge, which became the Oka crisis. Five years later at Ipperwash, Ont., one man was killed during a standoff over a land claim by Chippewa protesters outside a provincial park."The question we should all be asking ourselves as Canadians is: What do we do as a nation? Do we favour the peaceful path, openness, dialogue, or do we do things the old way, which got us here in the first place and which won't end anything?"  said Miller. "I choose the peaceful approach, the open approach, co-operation."The Trudeau government has been criticized for not doing more to end the blockades, which have been erected in support of the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs who oppose the Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline that crosses their territory in northern B.C. The pipeline is part of a $40-billion LNG Canada export project in Kitimat.CN obtained a court injunction to end the demonstration near Belleville on Feb. 7, but the Ontario Provincial Police have not enforced it.The company obtained fresh injunctions to stop three new blockades established on its network on Saturday — two in Vaughan, Ont., and one in Vancouver.Sean Finn, an executive with CN, said while the company supports dialogue between cabinet members and the demonstrators, he wants to see them come to an end."We're clearly in a position where we want to make sure we can get back to our main line in a safe fashion as quickly as possible, so we can serve both our Canadian customers and the Canadian economy," said Finn.Watch: Indigenous Services minister says 'modest progress' made in talks on rail blockadeMeeting planned between hereditary chiefs, B.C., and CanadaMembers of the Gitxsan First Nation temporarily took down a rail blockade near Hazelton, B.C., Thursday pending a proposed meeting with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, provincial and federal governments.On Sunday, the Prime Minister's Office said Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett has had several conversations with Wet'sewet'en hereditary chiefs over the last few days and is committed to meeting at their convenience. B.C. Indigenous Relations Minister Scott Fraser has said he will represent the provincial government.But while the talks have been represented as a joint meeting with the Gitxsan and Wet'suwet'en chiefs to engage in dialogue on how the impasse over the pipeline development arose, a Wet'suwet'en hereditary clan chief says leaders of his First Nation will only participate as witnesses.Na'moks, who also goes by John Ridsdale, said the meeting was proposed by the neighbouring Gitxsan and the Wet'suwet'en chiefs planned to honour the invitation."We have a willingness to move forward positively, we still have that in our hearts," he said Sunday, while adding the Wet'suwet'en chiefs won't budge on the pipeline."Our answer isn't going to change. The pipeline won't happen on our territory."Fraser said the meeting is scheduled to take place Monday in Victoria.An injunction in B.C. was enforced earlier this month by the RCMP to give Coastal GasLink access to a work site for the pipeline. More than two dozen protesters were arrested for refusing to obey it.Coastal GasLink has signed agreements with all 20 elected band councils along the pipeline route. However, Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs assert title to a vast 22,000-square-kilometre area and say band councils only have authority over reserve lands.

  • Home quarantine for travellers buys time as new virus spreads
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Home quarantine for travellers buys time as new virus spreads

    On his return from China last week, Dr. Ian Lipkin quarantined himself in his basement. His wife now puts his food on the stairs. He’s run out of things to watch on Netflix. At odd hours, he walks in New York's Central Park, keeping 10 feet away from others.Lipkin is among hundreds of people in the U.S. and thousands around the world who, although not sick, live in semi-voluntary quarantine at home. With attention focused on quarantined cruise ships and evacuees housed on U.S. military bases, those in their own homes have largely escaped notice.They, too, experts say, play a crucial role in slowing the spread of the new viral disease now called COVID-19.Most cases and nearly all deaths have been in mainland China. Around the world, authorities are urging two weeks of home quarantine and symptom monitoring for travellers returning from there.It's the only tool they have.“We don't yet have a vaccine and we don't have approved drugs for prevention of disease or treatment of disease. So all we have is isolation,” said Lipkin, who directs Columbia University's Center for Infection and Immunity.An expert virus hunter, Lipkin was invited by Chinese health authorities to help assess the risk posed by COVID-19. He did similar work in China during the SARS outbreak in 2003.“This is my second time in the slammer," said Lipkin, who spent time in quarantine then. He will end his confinement Tuesday, celebrating with a dry martini in public.The numbers in home quarantine are constantly changing and hard to pin down. New York state, for instance, has received the names of more than 350 who recently returned from mainland China. Local health departments are monitoring them, recommending quarantine for those without known exposure to the virus.State and U.S. guidelines sort people into high-, medium- and low-risk groups and have advice for each group, but local health departments have discretion in how to carry out the quarantines.Authorities in Taiwan have fined those who violate quarantines, but so far U.S. officials are relying on people's sense of responsibility, though they have the power to order a quarantine and get help from police to enforce it. Breaking a quarantine order is a misdemeanour in most states. Violating a federal quarantine order can mean fines and imprisonment.Some have put themselves in quarantine without an order from health authorities. In Highland, Indiana, Ken and Annie Zurek finished 15 days of self-imposed home quarantine Thursday.“We grew together as a couple,” Ken Zurek said. “I can’t think of any other person I’d want to spend in quarantine together.” Their confinement began after returning early from a trip to Chongqing, China, to meet their new granddaughter. Ken Zurek, a 63-year-old concrete business owner, had read up on the virus and added a 15th day to their quarantine “because I was a Boy Scout, always trying to be prepared and do the right thing.”Pat Premick, a 57-year-old executive coach who had been living in China, has been in self-quarantine in the Pittsburgh area since returning to the U.S. early this month. On Friday, she said she has two days left.To keep busy, she’s been doing puzzles, reading books and talking to friends in China who are going through the same thing. Since there aren’t many people in the area where she’s staying, she takes occasional walks. Friends have been leaving food for her outside, which she fetches after they walk away.“I’m waving from the window,” she said.In Seattle, public health workers buy groceries to make sure the people stay comfortable while in home quarantine, bringing one person blueberries, bananas and hair conditioner. Another person confined to a motel room asked for and received an instant teapot to heat soup. The health department workers make sure people have Wi-Fi so they can work and stay connected to family. They arrange calls with counsellors for those with anxiety.Several hundred returning travellers are staying away from others while they monitor their symptoms in Seattle's King County, where the health department is spending about $200,000 a week on efforts to contain the virus.“It’s a little bit crazy right now,” said Dr. Meagan Kay, who heads King County's containment efforts.In India, health authorities have advised a 28-day home quarantine for returning travellers, much longer than the two-week incubation period accepted elsewhere. In Kerala, a state in the southernmost tip of India with three confirmed cases of COVID-19, more than 2,300 people are quarantined at home. They are told to sleep wearing a medical mask and call a helpline if they feel stir crazy.“It is absolutely boring to be in your room for 28 days,” said Dr. Amar Fetle, who heads the response in Kerala.In Nordmaling, Sweden, the owners of a Chinese restaurant said they are following health authorities' guidelines by voluntarily quarantining themselves after a trip to China. They are closing their restaurant until Feb. 27.“It is to protect ourselves and our customers,” Stanislav Maid told the newspaper Aftonbladet. He runs the restaurant with his wife, Zhou Weixiang. “I have gotten quite a lot of positive reactions from people in the area who think it’s good we take our responsibility.”In Shanghai, China, home quarantine for journalist Michael Smith of The Australian Financial Review newspaper, began when he returned from a trip to Hong Kong.“I imagine this is how prison must feel,” Smith said in an email to The Associated Press on Friday, two days into a 14-day confinement. Smith can work at home, but no visitors are allowed and guards are monitoring the only entrance to the housing compound where he lives. He’s finding “an odd comfort” in not worrying about appointments and wearing track pants all day. “I’m treating this as a rare opportunity to read some books, binge watch some Netflix series and get some rest.”Israel's Health Ministry on Sunday extended a two-week home quarantine for people arriving from mainland China to include those who have recently spent time in Thailand, Macau, Singapore and Hong Kong.In New York, Lipkin finds in the COVID-19 outbreak echoes of the movie “Contagion,” for which he was chief science adviser. He has heard the movie has gained new popularity, and he hopes people are learning from it, washing their hands and listening to public health authorities.He takes his temperature twice a day and reports by email to the medical officer at Columbia, which directed him into home confinement. Unlike others in his situation, he was able to send a swab sample from the back of his nose and throat to his own lab to test for the virus. The result was negative. No virus.He uses an exercise bike, but most of the time, he works.“There's more work than I can possibly do because not only am I running the laboratory at Columbia and writing and dealing with media, but I'm also running programs in China," he said. “I'm not getting a lot of sleep."Lipkin and his wife, Katherine Lewis, are keeping their sense of humour. “My wife is terrific,” he said. "She’ll make dinner for me and leave it on the stairs and say, 'I'm putting it down here so I don't have to get your cooties.'“I hadn't heard the term 'cooties' in probably 50 years.”___Associated Press writers Candice Choi in New York and Aniruddha Ghosal in Delhi contributed.___The Associated Press Health & Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.Carla K. Johnson, The Associated Press

  • News
    Reuters

    Death squad disrupters: Filipina patrols help keep drug killings at bay

    Late each night, a dozen women chat and share a meal before hitting the narrow streets of a Manila suburb where a death squad once roamed. Not long after Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte declared a war on drugs in 2016 and promised thousands would die, Pateros was being terrorized by attackers in hoods and ski masks, known locally as the "bonnet gang".

  • Why Coastal GasLink says it rejected a pipeline route endorsed by Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs
    News
    CBC

    Why Coastal GasLink says it rejected a pipeline route endorsed by Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs

    As rallies spring up across Canada to support Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs fighting the Coastal GasLink pipeline in northern B.C., an increasing number of people are wondering: Why doesn't the company use an alternate route to avoid opposition?Former NDP MP Nathan Cullen raised the idea several times when he was still an elected representative for the region. More recently, Green Party MP Paul Manley returned from a January visit to the region with the idea — one he said came from the hereditary chiefs themselves."The Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs provided alternative routes to Coastal GasLink that would have been acceptable to them as a pipeline corridor," he said in a statement last month."Coastal GasLink decided that it did not want to take those acceptable options and instead insisted on a route that drives the pipeline through ecologically pristine and culturally important areas."The $6-billion, 670-kilometre Coastal GasLink pipeline would move natural gas from near Dawson Creek, in northeastern B.C., to a coastal LNG Canada export terminal in Kitimat. It is a key component of a $40-billion project announced by the federal and provincial governments last fall.Manley's statement has since gone viral, but little about the alternate path proposed by the hereditary chiefs has been reported. Here is what CBC has learned about that route, and the reasons given for its rejection.Coastal GasLink's selection processIn an interview with reporters on Jan. 27, Coastal GasLink president David Pfeiffer was asked why the company wouldn't move the pipeline's path in order to avoid conflict."We spent many years assessing multiple routes through the Wet'suwet'en Territory, about six years," Pfeiffer said. "The current route was selected as the most technically viable and one that minimized impact to the environment."He said the company explored multiple alternative routes after getting feedback from local First Nations and Indigenous leaders, including the Office of the Wet'suwet'en, a non-profit governed by Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs and used to manage lands and resources throughout their territory.On its website, Coastal GasLink provides a timeline of its route selection process, including a decision to use the "South of Houston" alternate route, which redirects one portion of the pipeline approximately 3.5 kilometres south of the original path.The company says the detour was selected after receiving feedback from Indigenous groups in the area.The Wet'suwet'en alternativeDuring the planning stages of the pipeline, the Office of the Wet'suwet'en presented Coastal GasLink with an alternate route through its territory referred to as "The McDonnell Lake route."According to Mike Ridsdale, the Office of the Wet'suwet'en's environmental assessment co-ordinator, that route would have followed a path through Wet'suwet'en territory eyed for use by Pacific Northern Gas for an expansion and looping project.Manley has confirmed this is the route he was referencing in his statement. Ridsdale said the route follows "already heavily disturbed areas along the Highway 16 corridor, and away from highly known cultural areas, as well as away from the Skeena headwaters of salmon spawning areas that the Wet'suwet'en rely on."Why it was rejectedIn a letter provided to CBC by the Office of Wet'swuwet'en, Coastal GasLink says it explored the possibility of using the McDonnell Lake route through aerial and computer reviews, and by meeting with representatives of Pacific Northern Gas.The letter — dated Aug. 21, 2014 — also outlines reasons Coastal GasLink rejected the route, including: * It would increase the pipeline's length by as much as 89 kilometers, upping both the environmental impact and as much as $800 million in capital costs.   * The pipeline's diameter, at 48 inches, is too large to safely be installed along the route. (Pacific Northern's pipeline is between 10 and 12 inches, and the proposed upgrade would be 24 inches.)   * The McDonnell Lake route would be closer to the urban B.C. communities of Smithers, Houston, Terrace and Kitimat.   * Re-routing the pipeline would impact an additional four First Nations who had not already been consulted by Coastal GasLink, which would add up to one year of delays to the construction process."From our perspective, the route was not feasible on the basis of those significant environmental and technical issues and therefore route examination ceased," said Coastal GasLink spokesperson Terry Cunha in a followup email to CBC.Those same reasons were laid out in the B.C. Supreme Court injunction issued Dec. 31, 2019, which allowed Coastal GasLink to proceed with construction of the pipeline.In a 2014 submission to Coastal GasLink and B.C.'s Environmental Assessment Office, the Office of the Wet'suwet'en cites Coastal GasLink's rejection of the McDonnell Lake route as a sign the company is unwilling to work with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs.Other proposed routesRidsdale said the Office of the Wet'suwet'en also proposed a second route, known as the Kemano, because then the pipeline would have travelled through an area already damaged by flooding from the Rio Tinto Alcan project. He also said the route ultimately selected by Coastal GasLink travels a portion of terrain known as the "Icy Pass route," and provided documentation from another pipeline company rejecting the Icy Pass route because of the high risk of erosion, slides and the need to construct numerous new access roads.There is no mention of the Kemano or Icy Pass routes in either the 2014 submission from the Office of the Wet'suwet'en, nor in the B.C. Supreme Court injunction.In that same 2014 letter, which Coastal GasLink has now published on its website, the company suggested using a "Morice River North" alternate route for approximately 55 km of the pipeline, which it said would take construction three to five kilometers away from the Unist'ot'en healing centre established by the hereditary chiefs in 2015.In a statement posted on its website, Coastal GasLink said it never received a response to this offer, nor to any other aspects of the letter.The Office of the Wet'suwet'en also did not respond to CBC's query asking for a response to Coastal GasLink's reasoning for rejecting the McDonnell Lake route."The route that has been selected reflects the best engineering, environmental, cultural and economically feasible criteria possible" Coastal GasLink said in an emailed statement to CBC.  "There is no route available to CGL that would avoid traditional Wet'suwet'en territory.… To change the route to avoid Wet'suwet'en territory at this date would require major environmental assessment work, which would not be feasible under the timelines to which we have committed."

  • Ontario: Most of Family Day will be pleasant, but unsettled weather will return
    News
    The Weather Network

    Ontario: Most of Family Day will be pleasant, but unsettled weather will return

    Temperatures will be slightly above seasonal Sunday, ahead of a messy system that threatens the early part of next week

  • Xi's early involvement in virus outbreak raises questions
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Xi's early involvement in virus outbreak raises questions

    BEIJING — A recent speech by Chinese President Xi Jinping that has been published by state media indicates for the first time that he was leading the response to a new virus outbreak from early on in the crisis.The publication of the Feb. 3 speech was an apparent attempt to demonstrate that the Communist Party leadership had acted decisively from the beginning, but also opens up the Chinese leader to criticism over why the public was not alerted sooner.In the speech, Xi said he gave instructions on fighting the virus on Jan. 7 and ordered the shutdown that began on Jan. 23 of cities at the epicenter of the outbreak. His remarks were published by state media late Saturday.“On Jan. 22, in light of the epidemic’s rapid spread and the challenges of prevention and control, I made a clear request that Hubei province implement comprehensive and stringent controls over the outflow of people," Xi told a meeting of the party's standing committee, its top body.The number of new cases in mainland China fell for a third straight day, China's National Health Commission reported Sunday. The 2,009 new cases in the previous 24-hour period brought the total to 68,500.Commission spokesman Mi Feng said the percentage of severe cases had dropped to 7.2% of the total from a peak of 15.9% on Jan. 27. The proportion is higher in Wuhan, the Hubei city where the outbreak started, but has fallen to 21.6%.“The national efforts against the epidemic have shown results," Mi said at the commission's daily media briefing.Taiwan on Sunday reported its first death from the virus, the fifth fatality outside of mainland China. The island also confirmed two new cases, raising its total to 20.Taiwan's Central News Agency reported that the person who died was a man in his 60s living in central Taiwan. He had not travelled overseas recently and had no known contact with virus patients, CNA said, citing Minister of Health and Welfare Chen Shih-chung.China reported 142 more deaths, almost all in Hubei, raising mainland China's death toll to 1,665. Another 9,419 people have recovered from COVID-19, a disease caused by a new coronavirus, and have been discharged from hospitals.Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe convened an experts meeting to discuss measures to contain the virus in his country, where more than a dozen cases have emerged in the past few days without any obvious link to China.“The situation surrounding this virus is changing by the minute,” Abe said.Japanese Health Minister Katsunobu Kato said the country is “entering into a phase that is different from before,” requiring new steps to stop the spread of the virus.Hundreds of Americans on a quarantined cruise ship in Japan took charter flights home, as Japan announced another 70 infections had been confirmed on the Diamond Princess. Canada, Hong Kong and Italy said they were planning similar flights.Japan now has 413 confirmed cases, including 355 from the cruise ship, and one death from the virus.Xi's role was muted in the early days of the epidemic, which has grown into one of the biggest political challenges of his seven-year tenure.The disclosure of his speech indicates top leaders knew about the outbreak’s potential severity at least two weeks before such dangers were made known to the public. It was not until late January that officials said the virus can spread between humans and public alarm began to rise.Zhang Lifan, a commentator in Beijing, said it's not clear why the speech was published now. One message could be that local authorities should take responsibility for failing to take effective measures after Xi gave instructions in early January. Alternatively, it may mean that Xi, as the top leader, is willing to take responsibility because he was aware of the situation, Zhang said.Trust in the government's approach to outbreaks remains fractured after the SARS epidemic of 2002 and 2003, which was covered up for months.Authorities in Hubei and Wuhan faced public fury over their initial handling of the epidemic. In apparent response, the Communist Party's top officials in Hubei and Wuhan were dismissed and replaced last week.Hubei announced Sunday that all vehicle traffic will be banned across the province, expanding on an existing ban in Wuhan, in another step to try to stop the spread of the virus. Exceptions will be made for vehicles involved in epidemic prevention and transporting daily necessities.The fall in new cases follows a spike of more than 15,000 announced on Thursday, when Hubei began to include those that had been diagnosed by a doctor but not yet confirmed by laboratory tests.The roughly 380 Americans aboard the cruise ship docked at Yokohama, near Tokyo, were given the option of taking U.S.-government chartered aircraft back to the U.S., where they would face another 14-day quarantine. Around 300 of them left on buses Sunday night for flights from Tokyo's Haneda Airport to Travis Air Force Base in California and Lackland Air Force Base in Texas.The U.S. Embassy in Tokyo said Washington was evacuating the Americans because the passengers and crew members on board the Diamond Princess were at a high risk of exposure to the virus. People with symptoms were banned from the flights.About 255 Canadians and 330 Hong Kong residents are on board the ship or undergoing treatment in Japanese hospitals. There are also 35 Italians, of which 25 are crew members, including the captain.Malaysia said it would not allow any more passengers from another cruise ship to transit the country after an 83-year-old American woman from the MS Westerdam tested positive for the virus.She was among 145 passengers who flew from Cambodia to Malaysia on Friday. Her husband also had symptoms but tested negative. The Westerdam was turned away from four ports around Asia before Cambodia allowed it to dock in Sihanoukville late last week.Malaysian Deputy Prime Minister Wan Azizah Wan Ismail said that her country would bar cruise ships that came from or transit any Chinese ports from docking.Cambodia said earlier that all 1,455 passengers on the Holland America-operated ship had tested negative for the virus.___Associated Press writer Ken Moritsugu and researcher Henry Hou in Beijing and writers Yuri Kageyama and Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo, Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Sopheng Cheang in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Frances D'Emilio in Rome and Rob Gillies in Toronto contributed to this report.Yanan Wang, The Associated Press

  • Syrian forces seize most of Aleppo province, on eve of Turkey-Russia talks
    News
    Reuters

    Syrian forces seize most of Aleppo province, on eve of Turkey-Russia talks

    AMMAN/BEIRUT/ANKARA (Reuters) - Syrian government forces made significant advances on Sunday in the country's northwestern Aleppo province, seizing most of the rebel-held region, state media said, a day before a new round of talks between Turkey and Russia on the escalation in the area. The Syrian government's recent advances in the northwestern region have upset a fragile cooperation between Ankara and Moscow, which back opposing factions in the conflict but have collaborated toward a political solution to the nearly nine-year war. Turkey, which backs rebels looking to oust Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, has been outraged since Syrian attacks in the Idlib region killed 13 Turkish troops in two weeks.

  • Nurses' unions warn national standards for coronavirus protection too low
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Nurses' unions warn national standards for coronavirus protection too low

    OTTAWA — The Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions is warning that the federal public health agency's guidelines to protect front-line health-care workers from outbreaks of diseases like the novel coronavirus don't go far enough, and might be putting them and patients at risk.The standards, which the Public Health Agency of Canada updated last week, lay out the precautions health-care workers should take when assessing and treating a patient with a possible case of the coronavirus, including what protective equipment should be used.The public health agency has committed to updating the guidelines as they learn more about the disease the World Health Organization has named COVID-19, which has sickened more than 64,000 people worldwide.Linda Silas, president of the labour organization, says the safety protocols are inadequate compared to those in Ontario and some other countries.Silas said the standards assume the coronavirus can't spread through the air — rather than through droplets — but she contends the science isn't settled on that front and the government should be taking greater care until they can be 100 per cent sure."When we do not know, we have to go for the best precautions for workers," said Silas.Nurses, doctors and other medical staff who come into contact with patients must be protected, not only for their own health but to stop the potential spread of the virus, she said."We need to make it clear that if health care workers are not safe, then patients are not safe," said Silas, who has written to federal Health Minister Patty Hajdu about her concerns.The Ontario government released its own guidelines calling for constant use of disposable respirators when interacting with a potential coronavirus patient, while the federal guidelines require only a surgical mask unless certain medical procedures are being done.The federal protocols are in line with the World Health Organization, but the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and its European counterpart have also recommended higher standards and a greater degree of precaution."In Canada the protection is much lower, and we will not accept that," Silas said.She recommends all health care workers, regardless of where they are, follow the CDC or Ontario standards rather than the federal ones.Other provinces are still developing their own protocols to respond to a potential coronavirus outbreak in Canada while others, like Manitoba, have opted to rely on the federal recommendations, leaving some health-care providers more protected than others, Silas said.Theresa Tam, chief public health officer at the Public Health Agency of Canada, said on Saturday there are eight people in Canada who have tested positive for the virus, following news on Friday that a new case was discovered in British Columbia.There have been three cases in Ontario and five in B.C., pending confirmation of the latest case by a laboratory.The Public Health Agency of Canada was created in the wake of the SARS outbreak in 2003.Mario Possamai, the former senior adviser on occupational health and safety matters for the SARS Commission, a judicial inquiry into how Ontario handled the deadly outbreak, said the federal public health agency is failing to learn from the experience of the province.Nearly half of the 247 cases in Ontario affected nurses, physicians, respiratory therapists, cleaners or other front-line workers."The SARS outbreak was 17 years ago, and I can't believe they haven't learned," he said.The final report of the SARS inquiry described a tale of two cities — Vancouver and Toronto — with afflicted patients arriving at hospital within hours of one another.The Vancouver patient was put into isolation within two-and-a-half hours of being admitted and treated by health-care professionals with respiratory protection.In contrast, a similar patient in Toronto wasn't isolated for 21 hours, and doctors wouldn't start wearing respirators for weeks.The report concluded that the procedures in place helped to save British Columbia from a major outbreak, while Ontario was thrown into a full public health crisis.Millions of dollars have been dispatched by governments around the world so global researchers can answer some of the lingering questions about the coronavirus, but until the science is settled lives could be saved by preparing for the worst-case scenario, Possamai said."That's why I'm so passionate about this, and so concerned," he said.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 16, 2020.Laura Osman, The Canadian PressNote to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version had an outdated number of COVID-19 cases in Canada.

  • Bernie's brand: The power of young Americans | The Weekly with Wendy Mesely
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  • CN Rail lays off staff as pipeline protests limit deliveries to Maritimes
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    CBC

    CN Rail lays off staff as pipeline protests limit deliveries to Maritimes

    CN Rail announced on Thursday it was shutting down its entire network east of Toronto because protesters near Belleville, Ont., are maintaining their blockade across the main line. Now the company is laying off some of its Eastern Canadian staff.Railway blockades are being felt across the Maritime provinces as propane runs low and pressure builds on trucking companies to make crucial deliveries.Demonstrations and blockades have been taking place across the country in support of the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs fighting the Coastal GasLink pipeline in northern B.C.Alexandre Boulé, who speaks for CN Rail, said temporary layoffs notices were sent to employees working in Eastern Passage, N.S., Moncton, N.B., Charny, Que., and Montreal."Our shutdown is progressive and methodical to ensure that we are well set up for recovery, which will come when the illegal blockades end completely," he said in an email.A spokesperson for the union, Bruce Snow, said there were seven people temporarily laid off in Moncton and three in Halifax.But he said this is just the beginning."We do, however, anticipate a much larger impact should the blockades continue to reduce or shut down the CN eastern network."Rail cars carry 3 times what trucks doJean-Marc Picard, executive director of the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association, said they started to see an impact late last week."Obviously if things keep up, we're going to be even busier," he said, adding that one rail car is the equivalent of three trucks."We can't handle all the rail traffic that's sitting there, it would be logistically impossible. But we're certainly doing what we can to alleviate the impact on communities."Picard said they are prioritizing based on need, but still have to keep up with their regular demands. He also said they can't operate beyond the industry's regulations, which limits how many hours a driver can work within a week."People don't realize how crucial it is, transportation to communities. Whether it's medical supplies, food, fuel," he said.Picard also said, even if the situation is resolved tomorrow, getting out the backlog of supply "will drag on for weeks and weeks."The president and CEO of the Canadian Propane Association said it's just a matter of days before the Maritime provinces start to see a shortage."This is an emergency. People have to understand that, and those that are protesting have to understand that there needs to be resumption of the services," Nathalie St-Pierre said on Sunday."We haven't seen any progress in terms of finding solutions now for the issues of getting the transportation to be back to normal. So it's very troublesome."Acadian Seaplants in Nova Scotia, which manufactures products from seaweed that are shipped all over the world, was forced to switch from propane to oil on Sunday afternoon.Jean-Paul Deveau, president and CEO of Acadian Seaplants, said that means the cost of operations has increased by 62 per cent."It is unacceptable that a small group of citizens may choose to ignore the decisions of our courts and have such an economic impact throughout the country," Deveau said in an email.St-Pierre said propane companies are rationing their supply and are prioritizing those with the most urgent need.But she said local governments may need to start preparing for what happens if the rail stoppages continue."Some industries can switch back to oil or other sources, but that's also going to run out eventually."MORE TOP STORIES

  • Thinning clouds in a warmer world could further amplify climate change
    News
    The Weather Network

    Thinning clouds in a warmer world could further amplify climate change

    Clouds could become more scarce as atmospheric temperatures soar, which could dramatically impact how quickly the climate warms.

  • News
    CBC

    'It was love at first sight': How this B.C. couple has made it work for more than 60 years

    When Katie Marguerite Walters first saw Frank Walters in 1955, she is sure "it was love at first sight."But she was only 14 and Frank was 19. "And in the 1950s you didn't date when you were that young," she said. "He was like a star to me."So it wasn't until five years later that Frank popped the question in the car on a quiet side road in London, Ontario. They got married in 1960 and they've been inseparable ever since."We're very fortunate to be together at this stage in our life," said Katie.After 60 years of marriage, two kids, four grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren, the couple — who moved to Salmon Arm after Frank retired from being a mining engineer in 1995 — has figured out what makes their relationship work.Respect"We've got to respect each other," said Frank, 85. Katie, 80, echoed this, adding that respect "cushions the blow" in any argument.Terms of endearment"I tell the young girls: If you're going to tell them off or really get ticked off with them at the end of the tirade, you say, 'dear,'" said Katie."I call her dear all the time," said Frank, a former recreational pilot. "She calls me lots of things."Sticking out tough timesWhenever they have a fight, the couple doesn't give up."You hang in there. Even if you don't agree with each other, you just darn well make it work," said Katie."In our day, that's what you did. You didn't just give up, and anybody that says they don't fight with each other, they're lying."Staying closeKatie said they stay close to each other every day and share a bed."We couldn't live without each other," she said. "He's just a great big teddy bear and easy to hug."

  • Quebec couple quarantined on cruise ship say Ottawa's reaction to coronavirus 'too little too late'
    News
    CBC

    Quebec couple quarantined on cruise ship say Ottawa's reaction to coronavirus 'too little too late'

    It has been almost two weeks since Manon Trudel and Julien Bergeron first boarded the Diamond Princess, a cruise ship that was suddenly turned into a floating quarantine station.And it will be at least another two weeks before the couple is allowed to return to their Montreal home.Whenever they do get home, they're likely to stay put for a while. "Do you think, for a second, that I can think about travelling again?" Trudel said Sunday from her windowless cabin aboard the ship. The Diamond Princess has been docked in Yokohama, Japan, since Feb. 3, following an outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) onboard. On Saturday, the Canadian government announced it was sending a chartered plane to repatriate the Canadian passengers. But for Trudel and Bergeron, that announcement did not come soon enough. "I feel the government reacted too late. Too little, too late," said Bergeron. "I think they reacted because the U.S. reacted." A U.S. aircraft arrived Sunday to repatriate the American passengers onboard. Canadian passengers will have to wait until Tuesday to leave the ship, Bergeron said.Trudel was on-deck — which passengers are allowed to use for an hour, once a day — when she heard the news about the U.S. passengers. "There were at least 10 American passengers on the deck at the time, and they were cheering and jumping. We felt happy for them," Trudel said. But Trudel began to cry as intercom messages on Sunday told American passengers to disembark. "I was always proud of my Canadian passport. But today, I would've loved to have an American one," she said. Quarantined for another 14 daysCanadians who are not showing symptoms of COVID-19 infection will be flown to Canadian Forces Base Trenton, in Ontario.There they will be assessed and then transported to the NAV Canada Training Institute in Cornwall to undergo another 14-day quarantine."This period on the boat is supposed to be the quarantine, but it's not a quarantine. We're not isolated. We're not in a hospital," said Bergeron. "And then, we have to do it again."  Trudel, who teaches a course on biological contaminants at CEGEP de Sorel-Tracy, is frustrated at the way the quarantine was handled by authorities.She said passengers were not given the right kind of masks to prevent transmission. "I took plenty of photos to play a game of 'find the mistakes' with my students when I get back," said Trudel. She's also been frustrated by the response of Canadian consular officials. Despite repeated efforts to contact them, the only response she's received is an email informing her that the embassy will not be able to reach her by phone.Increased anxietiesAs the quarantine has worn on, Trudel's anxieties about contracting the coronavirus have increased. In the early stages of the quarantine, the ship's captain used the intercom to deliver daily messages about the number of passengers and crew infected with the coronavirus. Those messages stopped abruptly on Saturday, making Trudel nervous. Her fears grew stronger when they heard another Quebec couple aboard the ship — with whom they had been in touch by phone — was diagnosed with the illness on Saturday.Quebec couple Diane and Bernard Ménard, both 75, were transported to a Japanese hospital for treatment Saturday morning. "We felt bad because if something was done before, perhaps they wouldn't have it. But now it's too late," Bergeron said. Bergeron and Trudel have been especially afraid of the coronavirus since they both have respiratory issues. Bergeron suffered from pneumonia last year and Trudel has had tuberculosis in the past. They were tested for COVID-19 on Sunday morning. The results are expected within three days.

  • Growlers set home winning streak record while helping out those in need
    News
    CBC

    Growlers set home winning streak record while helping out those in need

    Newfoundland Growlers fans brought more than just their team spirit to a record-breaking hockey game Friday night.The Growlers made history, defeating the Maine Mariners 5-1 at Mile One Centre for the team's 19th straight win on home ice — setting a new ECHL record.The former record for most consecutive home wins was set back in 1995 by the South Carolina Stingrays.  The need is just incredibly strong. \- Joanne ThompsonThe Growlers decided to celebrate the winning streak by teaming up with The Gathering Place and collection donations for those in need this winter. Spectators were asked to bring along a new package of socks or underwear to throw onto the ice during the first intermission. Joanne Thompson, executive director of The Gathering Place, says the need for such donations is huge. "We certainly ended up with a significant donation of socks and underwear," she said."To get that much at once is really quite tremendous because it helps us now in the coming weeks … the need is just incredibly strong."In addition to the donations, Thompson is thankful the Growlers helped to bring awareness to the fact that there are plenty of people in St. John's in great need. "The exposure around the number of people who are cold and are not able to take care in cold weather … the fact is that they have to try and find somewhere — usually inadequate — to get in out of the cold," she said."Anything that we can do to raise awareness around that, and anything we can do to try to assist in the most basic ways, is really quite important."Thompson said it's important for organizations at every level to do their part in supporting the entire community. "We can all do something," she said. "The Friday night game was so significant and so much fun — it was just wonderful."The Newfoundland Growlers home winning streak ended on Saturday night, however, when they lost to the Maine Mariners 3-1.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Justin Timberlake on 'trauma' of being pelted with  bottles at SARS concert
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Justin Timberlake on 'trauma' of being pelted with bottles at SARS concert

    TORONTO — Justin Timberlake is still haunted by being pelted with what he says were bottles of urine at the 2003 Toronto SARS benefit show.The "Can't Stop the Feeling" singer appeared on the "The Graham Norton Show" on Friday where he reflected on the nasty reception he received at the charity event.Reports at the time say Timberlake was booed and that water bottles were thrown — but Timberlake says those plastic containers were filled with pee."You would think Canadians are historically peaceful people," he told the panel of celebrity guests on the comedy talk show."I still have a lot of trauma," he joked.Timberlake says it all started when he was invited by Mick Jagger to perform at the 11-hour Toronto fundraiser attended by a crowd of an estimated 450,000 people.The former 'NSync member was hot on the heels of his solo debut album "Justified," which was in heavy rotation on MTV and MuchMusic. He was already in town for two stadium shows, so he agreed to make an afternoon appearance at the SARS event.But he says it became quite apparent when he arrived at the show that he'd be an outlier in the lineup of mostly established rock acts."I look at the bill and it's the Rolling Stones, AC/DC, and the Guess Who. You get the picture," he said. "And like, somewhere in there — me."That's when he knew things were going south."It was a bit of a blur, but I just remember saying to the band before we went on stage, 'I don't think this is going to go well,' " he said."I had no idea how bad it was going to go."Timberlake said when opened his three-song set the bottles of urine started flying from the front rows of the audience.Anna Kendrick, who appeared on Graham Norton's show alongside Timberlake to promote their film "Trolls World Tour," was quick to question how the incident unfolded."Did they do it really quickly? Was it preplanned?" she asked.Timberlake says he was puzzled: "All of these questions I had going through my brain as I tried to at least remember lyrics that I actually wrote to the first song I'm playing."The singer said he dodged the projectiles as best he could before taking an unmovable spot behind his keyboard to sing "Senorita.""After that song either one of two things happened: Either they ran out of nerve, because they knew I was going to stay there, or they ran out of urine," he said."It wasn't always good times for me, you guys."Timberlake says he was impressed with how he handled the situation, and suggested there's a lesson in this for younger generations: "Be tenacious."This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 16, 2020.Follow @dfriend on Twitter.David Friend, The Canadian Press

  • Mars will disappear behind the Moon on Tuesday, here's how to see it
    News
    The Weather Network

    Mars will disappear behind the Moon on Tuesday, here's how to see it

    Skywatchers will be treated to a spectacle Tuesday morning, as Mars will tuck itself behind the Moon for an hour

  • News
    CBC

    Flooding forces woman, 2 children to evacuate Summerside home

    A woman and her two children had to evacuate their Summerside home due to flooding early Saturday.The Canadian Red Cross said the pipes burst at one of the units of a seven-townhouse complex on Jennifer Street at about 4 a.m.No one was injured, said Dan Bedell, with the Red Cross.The extent of the damage to the home isn't known, he said."We were told that the issue was that the pipes were frozen and that caused a burst in the pipes and that's what led to the flooding," Bedell said."It was all related to the very cold weather we had on Thursday into the early part of the weekend," he said. Volunteers with the Red Cross have helped the family access emergency lodging and food. The family was able to retrieve their own clothing.Officials aren't sure how long it will be before the family can return home, Bedell said.More from CBC P.E.I.

  • News
    CBC

    Bombardier to sell train-making division to French multinational Alstom: report

    Bombardier Inc. has reached a preliminary deal to sell its transportation division to Paris-based Alstom SA for more than $7 billion US, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.The newspaper, citing unnamed sources familiar with the details, said the deal could be announced as early as Monday.It also said Quebec's pension fund manager, the Caisse de dépôt et placement, will sell its 32.5 per cent stake in Bombardier's train unit to Alstom and buy a minority stake in the combined train company.Bombardier has around $7 billion of debt coming due by 2025 and has been selling assets in recent years to stabilize its financial position. Last week, the company announced the sale of its remaining commercial aviation project, a minority position in Airbus's A220.If the sale of its transportation division goes ahead, it would leave Bombardier with only its business-jet unit.Bombardier Transportation employs around 1,000 people in Quebec, mainly at a factory in La Pocatière, and 3,000 people in the rest of Canada. It has plants in Thunder Bay and Kingston, and offices in Vancouver and Mississauga.A spokesperson for Quebec's economy minister, Pierre Fitzgibbon, said he would respond "when it's official."

  • N.B. chaplain provides comfort to Australians affected by bushfires
    News
    CBC

    N.B. chaplain provides comfort to Australians affected by bushfires

    Chaplain Luanna Dugas of Douglas, N.B., says the thing she noticed most when she arrived in Australia was the ever-present smell of smoke. "The smell was in the air and it felt like you were sitting on top of a campfire all the time," she said.Dugas was one of three Canadian chaplains with the Billy Graham Rapid Response Team who spent three weeks providing emotional and spiritual support in communities dealing with wildfires.  She said they spent a week in Bairnsdale before she and another chaplain moved on to Batemans Bay to assist and provide relief to their Australian colleagues. She experienced the smoke and saw the colour of the sky changed because of the fires. It was new for her, but she said it had become normal for those living there."At two o'clock in the afternoon, the sun is a bright, bright red, as if the sun was setting." But Dugas said everyone was traumatized by the devastation. She said the chaplains are prepared to deal with that."A lot of people were affected by the fires but it brought back memories of even childhood traumas that they lived through," she said.Dugas said most of their work was helping them cope with their emotions.Help was offered to first responders who had been battling the fires for months."It's very hard on emotional, physical, spiritual — every element of being healthy has been compromised." Dugas's work also included sifting through the remains of homes to help families find whatever was left. She related the story of one man, Ean Newell, who lost his home, outbuildings and the equipment he used to live self-sufficiently in the Australian bush. All that he managed to save was the Jeep he called Margaret. "When he lost everything he didn't know where to turn," Dugas said.She said she assisted Samaritan's Purse in helping the man find anything in the devastation. They were able to recover a few items, including some coins that belonged to his grandmother."You could see the little pieces of his life and it was just something he gets to hold on to. He felt like he didn't lose everything." Dugas said she was happy she was able to help."I feel really blessed that I'm able to go and that I'm able to walk alongside these people in their journey to recovery."

  • RCMP arrest alleged 'money mules'; Facial recognition concerns: CBC's Marketplace consumer cheat sheet
    News
    CBC

    RCMP arrest alleged 'money mules'; Facial recognition concerns: CBC's Marketplace consumer cheat sheet

    Miss something this week? Don't panic. CBC's Marketplace rounds up the consumer and health news you need.Want this in your inbox? Get the Marketplace newsletter every Friday.Couple arrested over scam calls from India Federal authorities have arrested a Toronto-area husband and wife accused of being Canadian accomplices to an enormous global scam involving overseas call centres, including the so-called CRA tax scam. RCMP Insp. Jim Ogden says Marketplace's 2018 and 2019 investigations played a big role in the arrests.  "It certainly helped that CBC did their exposé … that highlighted this a little more for all Canadians," he said.Inquiry into flight-delay compensationOttawa requires airlines to pay up to $1,000 in compensation for flight delays or cancellations that are within their control and not safety related. But when an airline denies a passenger compensation, it must explain why, and complaints have been mounting from passengers that airlines aren't adequately explaining their reasons. The Canadian Transport Authority says it will "take appropriate action" if it finds airlines aren't playing by the rules.More police using facial recognition technologyPrivacy advocates are calling on all levels of government to create specific regulations around police use of facial recognition technology. Canada doesn't have a policy on the collection of biometrics, which are physical and behavioural characteristics that can be used to identify people digitally. Because of that, there are no minimum standards for privacy, mitigation of risk or public transparency, according to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada's website. In that vacuum, some police departments have begun to use the technology.StubHub fined $1.3M Ticket reseller StubHub will pay a $1.3 million penalty for making it seem as though some concert and game tickets were available at prices that no customer could ever obtain once fees are tacked on. The Competition Bureau says StubHub was advertising misleading ticket prices across various websites and mobile apps because fees and other charges weren't included.What else is going on? Toyota's paint-peeling problem to be covered under 'unprecedented' extended warranty for certain models  Extended warranty includes certain years of Camrys, Corollas, RAV4s, some as old as 2008.Malls experimenting with fancy food halls to lure back shoppers Shopping centres experimenting with new strategy in era when a growing number of people shop online.New Canadian standard developed to make BBQ grill brushes safer after ingested bristles cause injuries A new national safety standard for barbecue grill brushes will require a warning label and testing to reduce the risk of wire bristles becoming detached, embedded in food and accidentally ingested.Here's how produce stickers contribute to climate change The stickers are too small to be screened out in the waste sorting process, but don't break down during composting.The latest in recallsThese sexual enhancement pills have been recalled due to an undisclosed prescription drug and the potential for serious health risks.This can of aerosol has been recalled due to a flammability hazard.This peanut spread has been recalled due to a Listeria concern.This week on MarketplaceTo catch a scammer with David CommonJoin Marketplace for exclusive access to a police investigation connected to the scam calls that plague us all. For two years, we've zeroed in on scammers in Indian call centres targeting Canadians: posing as CRA agents, tech support workers or impersonating police and other government officials. Many of you have come forward sharing your stories and complaining about why authorities can't do more to stop the scammers.  And we've always wondered: are there accomplices in Canada? We have exclusive access to the surveillance and arrest of alleged "super money mules" in Canada.  Our cameras are there as it all unfolds early one morning. We have a full update on how the scammers are adapting, the likely impact of enforcement actions, and how police will tackle it going forward.  Even the Mounties tell Marketplace our previous investigations helped push top brass to launch federal enforcement efforts. And they say, it's paying off now with arrests and the expectation of more to come. It's a fast-paced, exciting episode that we're really proud to show you all. Watch our full investigation and past episodes of Marketplace anytime on CBC Gem.

  • Police seek to identify man after woman, 87, robbed in apartment building lobby
    News
    CBC

    Police seek to identify man after woman, 87, robbed in apartment building lobby

    Toronto police are appealing to the public for help in identifying a man accused of robbing an 87-year-old woman in a North York apartment building on Friday.In a news release on Sunday, police said the elderly woman entered the lobby of the building in the Keele Street and Sheppard Avenue West area at around 2 p.m. and was approached by an unknown man."She was thrown from her walker onto the ground," police said in the release.The man then robbed the woman of personal items and memorabilia from her late husband before he fled the area through the front door, police said.Police describe the suspect as being tall with a heavy build. At the time, he was wearing oval-shaped glasses, a black Northface winter jacket with the hood up, a grey Jordan baseball cap with a gold round sticker, a two-tone dark and light coloured scarf covering his face, white gloves, dark pants, and black and white running shoes.On Sunday, police released images of the man captured by CCTV.Anyone with information is urged to call police at 416-808-3100, or Crime Stoppers anonymously toll-free at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS).

  • Canada expected to support heavy fuel ban in Arctic despite costs to northerners
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Canada expected to support heavy fuel ban in Arctic despite costs to northerners

    The federal government is expected to support international measures that would reduce the environmental impact of Arctic shipping but would cost northern families hundreds of dollars a year.On Monday, the International Maritime Organization is to begin considering how to eliminate the use of heavy fuel oil in ships sailing Arctic waters.Arctic countries have already agreed to the move in principle, but the meeting is to set terms for the fuel's phaseout. Heavy fuel oil, or HFO, is considered a major spill risk and a source of black carbon, which hastens the melting of sea ice."HFO constitutes the bottom of the barrel when it comes to shipping fuel," said Dan Hubbell of the Ocean Conservancy. "It's cheap, it's dirty and it's very persistent."Hubbell said a moderate spill in Russia in 2003 had big impacts still visible more than a decade later on marine mammals. The fuel is already banned in the Antarctic.But replacement fuels are more expensive. Transport Canada has analyzed what higher costs would mean for Arctic communities, which depend on supplies ranging from dry goods to construction materials that arrive by sea.It concluded the average Nunavut household would see an increase of up to $649 a year. Sealifts used by families to bring in bulk supplies of non-perishable commodities from the south would cost an extra $1,000 for a six-metre shipping container.More than half of Eastern Arctic households are already considered severely food insecure, meaning they can't always count on having enough food for their next meal.Transport Canada says higher fuel prices will also affect mining companies and governments."A ban on HFO in the Arctic resulting in higher shipping costs passed on to the consumer would have a significant impact on households and communities," the report says. "This could include direct and indirect effects on the health and quality of life of Indigenous and Inuit peoples living in the Arctic."Six out of eight Arctic countries currently support the ban. Russia is opposed and Canada has said it won't announce its position until the meeting begins.But in a telephone call with stakeholders last week, officials said Canada will side with the majority."They did confirm that they would be supporting the ban," said Andrew Dumbrille of the World Wildlife Fund, who was on the call."Everybody else heard that too. It was pretty clear that's the Canadian position."Neither the Nunavut government nor Nunavut Tunngavik, which oversees the Nunavut land claim, was available for comment.The land-claim group has supported the ban in the past before the costs were analyzed.Both Dumbrille and Hubbell agree the federal government should ease the cost concerns for northerners."The federal government needs to step up and manage the cost so it isn't passed on to northerners," Dumbrille said. "The environmental benefits are clear."The meeting is also to consider what makes up a heavy fuel oil. Regulations reducing the allowable amount of sulphur in fuel came into effect Jan. 1, but research has found that many new blends created to meet the new rules still emit black carbon.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 16, 2020— Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960Bob Weber, The Canadian Press

  • Courtroom psychology tests may be unreliable, study finds
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Courtroom psychology tests may be unreliable, study finds

    WASHINGTON — Courts are not properly screening out unreliable psychological and IQ tests, allowing junk science to be used as evidence, researchers have concluded. Such tests can sway judges or juries and influence whether someone gets custody of a child or is eligible for bail or capital punishment.The scientists looked at hundreds of different psychological tests used in recent court cases and found that a third of those exams weren't reviewed in the field's most prominent manuals. Of those that were reviewed, just 40% were graded favourably. Nearly a quarter were deemed unreliable.“There’s huge variability in the psychological tools now being admitted in U.S. courts,” said Tess Neal, an Arizona State University psychology professor and co-author of the study published Saturday in the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest.“There’s a lot of stuff that looks like it’s junk and should be filtered out by the courts, but it’s not being filtered out," said Neal.Legal challenges to the validity of psychological tests occurred in less than 3% of cases, the researchers found.“This paper is highly significant, in part because many people’s fates are determined by these tests,” said Dan Simon, an expert on law and psychology at the University of Southern California Law School, who was not involved in the research.The new study is not the first critique of how science is used in the courts.In 2009, the National Research Council released an extensive report on courtroom science that found that "testimony based on faulty forensic science analyses may have contributed to wrongful convictions of innocent people."The critique prompted calls for reform, and only partial progress has been made, said Simon.“Courts are supposed to sift out the junk science from the good science, as laid out in the federal rules of evidence" — a set of national guidelines that require that “testimony is the product of reliable principles and methods.”“But that’s not happening,” said Simon.The new study examined 876 court cases in the U.S. between 2016 and 2018, and found the most commonly used psychological test was the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, which has generally positive reviews in the professional literature.The second most common was the Rorschach test — sometimes colloquially called the inkblot test. While the test, first developed in 1921, has its defenders, some scientists regard it as dangerously ambiguous and subjective.Robert MacCoun, a professor of law and psychology at Stanford University who was not involved in the study, said that he's received unsolicited catalogues advertising new psychological tests from vendors for many years. Those brochures used to include data about test effectiveness, but “by the end of the 1990s those numbers had disappeared.”Lawyers and judges, who are not experts in testing methods, must rely on the expertise of psychologists to perform due diligence on tests they present as evidence, said Harvey Fishbein, a criminal defence attorney in Manhattan who was not involved in the study.“If psychologists are not willing to regulate their own field, it’s a real problem.”___Follow Christina Larson on Twitter: @larsonchristina___The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.Christina Larson, The Associated Press

  • Trades school? Bartering the only way into these N.S. workshops
    News
    CBC

    Trades school? Bartering the only way into these N.S. workshops

    On a quiet Saturday afternoon over a long weekend, four women met up to learn how to make scrunchies at a workshop in north-end Halifax.But instead of paying for the class with money, they exchanged goods instead. In this case, the instructor requested earthy-coloured thread, unscented lotion or any healthy food item."It's always great to learn a new skill, but I really enjoy the social aspect of it, just getting out and meeting people with similar interests," said Jenn Prager, who brought honey and thread as her means of payment.The workshop was facilitated through an organization called Life.School.House, a co-operative non-profit.It was started by Jenn and Scott DeCoste in their Dartmouth, N.S., living room in 2018. In the first year, they held 60 classes."It's a network of barter-based folk schools that are running across Nova Scotia, offering space for people from the community to come and offer programs on any number of topics to other members of their community with no monetary exchange," Jenn DeCoste said.She said the space is made available at no charge and the people who instruct are local."They'll come in and teach anything from weaving to sewing to carpentry to car maintenance to leather work, anything that people have learned to do," she said.DeCoste said she and her husband wanted to create a community space in their home.The first year was a big hit, DeCoste said, with classes filling up minutes after being advertised. They found more people to host classes across the province who were willing to use the model.The bartering aspect of the classes made them accessible to more people, she said."The act of giving is so well-received by our facilitators, they feel so rewarded by that it's really different than exchanging a $10 bill ... It's been really quite lovely," she said.The scrunchie-making workshop on Saturday was hosted at Jodene Dunleavy's house and led by a sewing instructor.In the past, Dunleavy, has opened her home so classes can be held on topics including time management and bullet journal organizing, cooking, photography and macramé."Anybody can come to these classes." Dunleavy said. "It doesn't matter what resources you have because you can just pick up anything that the person wants for a barter item. You don't need money."Today, it didn't cost a penny for anybody to come. The barter allows more people to come. It takes away any kind of dynamic between teacher and student because everybody's exchanging something for their time and knowledge."DeCoste said swaps are hosted on a monthly basis, where people can exchange things they've made."People come and they bring whatever they have and they take whatever they need," she said."You can knit three or four scarves and go home with sourdough bread and go home with homemade soap and go home with all kinds of lovely things you'd see at a farmer's market."DeCoste said the program has reached newcomers to Canada. On Sunday, she said a woman from India has been offering cooking classes to share her family's recipes."Because it's offered on a barter basis, it allows people to really connect in with her on a different level and really get deeper knowing of Indian culture and that sense community that's built around those gatherings," she said.Life.School.House events and workshops are listed on their Eventbrite page.MORE TOP STORIES

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Young Ugandan who featured in a Disney chess film dies at 15

    KAMPALA, Uganda — A Ugandan student who played a memorable role in a 2016 Disney film about a local chess prodigy has died at the age of 15.Nikita Pearl Waligwa died on Saturday at a hospital near the Ugandan capital, Kampala. The cause was a brain tumour, according to the girls' secondary school she had attended since 2018.She was "a darling to many,” Gayaza High School said on Twitter.Local media reported that Waligwa had been in and out of hospital with a recurring brain tumour and had previously received treatment, including surgery, in India.Tributes were coming in for her on social media as Ugandans expressed sadness and recalled her role in the 2016 movie directed by Mira Nair and filmed in Kampala.“Queen of Katwe” follows the rise of Ugandan chess prodigy Phiona Mutesi as a chess player amid grinding poverty in the Kampala slum of Katwe, with her single mother barely able to support her and her two siblings. Mutesi falls under the spell of an unassuming chess teacher who encourages the teenager to learn the game despite the skepticism of her mother, who warns her not to dream big because “you will be disappointed.”The film was received favourably in Uganda, where young people with no acting experience shared the limelight with stars like Academy Award winner Lupita Nyong’o. One of those Ugandans was Waligwa, who played Gloria, a chess player younger than Phiona who memorably said in the movie that in the game of chess “the small one can become the big one.”Rodney Muhumuza, The Associated Press